News at Princeton

Monday, Sept. 15, 2014

Multimedia: Featured

'Frogs + Forms'


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Jaewon Choi created a large-scale painting for her visual arts senior thesis show. Meanwhile, her physics thesis explores light emitted at the beginning of the universe. Read more.


Video Closed Captions

[Music]

JAEWON: I'm Jaewon.

I'm a physics major, and I'm
doing a certificate in visual

arts, and my show, entitled
"Frogs and Forms," is

opening next week.


I'm constantly back and forth
from sort of freaking out and

feeling really excited
about it.

But at the same time, I'm trying
to remind myself how

happy I am to be
able to paint.


This painting that I'm working
on right now is the biggest

painting that I've
made so far.

EVE ASCHHEIM: It's a very
ambitious show.

The paintings are not only
large, but they're challenging

in terms of the subject
matter.

I think her work deals with
sexuality and its different

forms. For example, aggression,
intimacy,

voyeurism, exhibitionism,
the uncomfortableness.

Her paintings are
confrontational, they're

arresting, but they're also
personal and intimate.

You have the feeling the
figures are inhabited.

They're not merely objects
that are sort of for the

viewer's consumption,
but they have some

of their own volition.

I think it's a really
interesting moment where young

women can determine how
they want images of

themselves to appear.


LYMAN PAGE: So we just heard the
critique of Jaewon's work.

People say what they want to
say, and their impressions,

and their thoughts, and their
critiques are all over the

place, and emphasizing
different things.

Whereas in Physics,
it's much more--

is it correct or is
it incorrect?

JAEWON: I absolutely love
studying physics at Princeton.

It is not any less beautiful
than art.

LYMAN PAGE: Her thesis is about
the light that's left

over from the birth
of the universe.

Actually, the light she's
studying for the Physics side

of her thesis, we can't
see with our eyes.

By far the most rewarding thing
is working individually

with students.

It's just fun, because students
are so open, and do

everything, and can
do anything.

EVE ASCHHEIM: Being a young
person and discovering

something for the first time,
and being able to make

something that's never been
made before, is a very

exciting moment.

It's exciting to
be part of it.

It is one of the joys
of my life.


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