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Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014
 

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'Cardboard Canoe Race'



Campus Recreation recently held a cardboard canoe building and racing competition where students were given 90 minutes and limited supplies to build a successful canoe. The pressure was on as the time ran down and supplies ran short. Here is a look at what happened.


Video Closed Captions


JESSICA WARD: This is the fifth
year of the Cardboard

Canoe Race.

We get teams of 25 partners,
where they have 90 minutes to

build a canoe that will fit both
them and their partner.

And they have to use a pile of
cardboard, two garbage bags,

one roll of duct tape,
and one box cutter.

And that's it.

Those are the only supplies
they are given.

KATE KANEKA: I guess our
strategy is, because we are

not science students but we're
small, we're just making our

boat as small as possible.

SUMMER SHAW: As small
as possible.

KATE KANEKA: And--

SUMMER SHAW: And streamlined.

KATE KANEKA: Yeah,
and very strong.

SUMMER SHAW: Strong,
but streamlined.

CHRIS LANDO: So, our basic game
plan here is we're going

to have the boat that
gets across fastest.

JUNYA TAKAHASHI: Yeah.

CHRIS LANDO: And--

JUNYA TAKAHASHI: We're
going to do it by

building the best boat.

That's key.

And then after we have the best
boat, we're going to row

the fastest.

JENNY WU: Our design plan is to
make sort of like a raft,

and use structural supports
would be more like triangles.

And these are areas where we
can't really step on, so that

means that we have a narrow
area in the middle that we

could step on.

So that means that it minimizes
the chance that

we'll capsize.

ERIC HAGSTROM: So, our strategy
is we're trying to

create like on pontoon boat--
think like Castaway or

something--

where we've--

If you take a look here, the
boxes, we've taped them up so

that the coarse edges are
covered by duct tape.

And the cardboard edges are
actually relatively like

[KNOCKING ON CARDBOARD].

They don't absorb water.

And so, we're filling up a bunch
of boxes, attaching them

to a board on top, and then
we'll be riding the other side

of the board, and these
will keep us afloat.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

ANDREW CHAN: It feels
encouraging that our design

was sufficient to last
the entire lap.


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