News at Princeton

Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014
 

Multimedia: Featured

'Cynthia Lu: The Art of Computer Science'



Jingwan "Cynthia" Lu, a Princeton University fourth-year graduate student in computer science, is redefining the way an artist can "paint" with digital strokes on a computer. Read more.


Video Closed Captions


CYNTHIA LU: Tango is a very
intellectual kind of dancing.

It involves a lot of brain
power somehow.

I am Jingwan Lu.

I come from Beijing, China.

I am doing a Ph.D. at the
Computer Science Department in

Princeton University.

I'm in my first year in PhD.

I learned tango here.

Tango to me involves a lot of
intricate body movements that

in a way echo the kind of
intricate patterns I work with

in computer graphics.

I have always been interested
in art, including different

types of dancing, drawing,
and painting.

This is our research lab.

While doing computer science,
most of the time you sit there

and do your own stuff.

To go out dancing somewhere
will be enriching my life

because it gives me an
opportunity to actually

interact with real people.

The goal of this project is
trying to make use of existing

strokes that artists made on
canvas, trying to map them

directly into the digital
painting program.

First of all, the results are
more realistic and artists can

express their creativity by
making their own examples.

I started this project when I
was doing a summer internship

at Adobe Systems where we
did a project about line

stylization, which we presented
at SIGGRAPH

Conference last year.

And it's actually very exciting
that Adobe is really

interested in this research
and is considering

transferring it into their real
product, like an app on

tablet or cell phone.

This project also triggered
interest from Google, where

they funded me with this
two-year graduate student

fellowship in artistic media.

They have different types of
research areas related to

computer photography and maybe
in the future, artistic media.

By doing this kind of research,
I find that to be a

pretty good blend of my
interests in both computer

science and art.

It's just very exciting to see
people use my software that

comes out of my Ph.D. program.

It will be very fascinating to
see my research get used in 10

years or 20 years.

Tango is a very intellectual
kind of dancing.

It involves a lot of brain
power somehow.

I am Jingwan Lu.

I come from Beijing, China.

I am doing a Ph.D. at the
Computer Science Department in

Princeton University.

I'm in my first year in Ph.D.
I learned tango here.

Tango to me involves a lot of
intricate body movements that

in a way echo the kind of
intricate patterns I work with

in computer graphics.

I have always been interested
in art, including different

types of dancing, drawing,
and painting.

This is our research lab.


While doing computer science,
most of the time you sit there

and do your own stuff.

To go out dancing somewhere
will be enriching my life

because it gives me an
opportunity to actually

interact with real people.

The goal of this project is
trying to make use of existing

strokes that artists made on
canvas, trying to map them

directly into the digital
painting program.

First of all, the results are
more realistic and artists can

express their creativity by
making their examples.

I started this project when I
was doing summer internship at

Adobe Systems where we did a
project about line stylization

which we presented at SIGGRAPH
Conference last year.

And it's actually very exciting
that Adobe is really

interested in this research
and is considering

transferring it into their real
product, like an app on

tablet or cell phone.

This project also triggered
interest from Google, where

they funded me with this
two-year graduate student

fellowship in artistic media.

They have different types of
research areas related to

computer photography,
and maybe in the

future, artistic media.

By doing this kind of research,
I find that to be a

pretty good blend of my
interests in both computer

science and art.

It's just very exciting to see
people use my software that

comes out of my Ph.D. program.

It will be very fascinating to
see my research get used in 10

years or 20 years.


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