News at Princeton

Monday, Sept. 29, 2014
 

Archive – May, 2006

University extends Humanitarian Relief Efforts Policy

Princeton University has extended its Humanitarian Relief Efforts Policy, which provides two weeks of paid leave for employees to volunteer with agencies working in the Gulf Coast, until June 30, 2007.

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History of Reunions wear on display through Jan. 30

"Going Back in Orange and Black," an exhibition at the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, highlights the unique wardrobes of Princeton's Reunions from the 19th century to the present. The exhibition will run through Tuesday, Jan. 30, in the library's Wiess Lounge. 

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Study: Stock performance tied to ease of pronouncing company's name

The ease of pronouncing the name of a company and its stock ticker symbol influences how well that stock performs in the days immediately after its initial public offering, two Princeton psychologists have found.

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Colloquium to explore service, June 1

Members of the University community are invited to explore the challenges, opportunities and meaning in service during a colloquium from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, June 1, on the third floor of the Frist Campus Center. 

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Study of past sets salutatorian on course for future

From a young age, Dan-el Padilla Peralta viewed the study of ancient civilizations as the foundation of his path to a better future. When Padilla was 8, living with his family in a shelter in New York's Chinatown, he came across a copy of a guidebook to ancient Athens and Rome. The book spurred an interest in the study of classics -- and of the pursuit of education in general -- that eventually led Padilla to Princeton, where his many academic achievements have culminated in his selection as salutatorian of the class of 2006.

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Top of the charts: Valedictorian composes impressive record of achievement

For his senior thesis in music composition, Chris Douthitt composed three songs for guitar, bass and fiddle that are "really beautiful, really wonderful," according to thesis adviser Dan Trueman. They also are a testament to the passion and drive that have helped Douthitt achieve the distinction of valedictorian of the class of 2006.

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Commencement events scheduled, June 4-6

Several activities for undergraduate and graduate degree candidates and their families are planned for Sunday through Tuesday, June 4-6. 

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Memorial service planned for Manzili Davis, May 24

A memorial service for Manzili Davis, a Princeton senior who died in April, is planned for 5 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 24, in the chancel at the University Chapel.  

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Three elected to American Philosophical Society

Three Princeton scholars are among 49 people recently elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society.

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Book chronicles Princeton’s rise from small college to intellectual powerhouse

When Woodrow Wilson took over the presidency of Princeton University in 1902, the college was a small institution with about 1,300 students and modest ambitions. Wilson’s plan for transforming the University — by radically upgrading the faculty, the curriculum and the graduate school — laid the groundwork for Princeton to become one of the nation’s pre-eminent universities.

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Media advisory: Princeton Commencement to be held June 6

Members of the news media who wish to attend any of Princeton University's 2006 graduation ceremonies Sunday through Tuesday, June 4-6, must contact the University's Office of Communications no later than noon Tuesday, May 30, to request credentials.    

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Tropical forests leak nitrogen back into atmosphere, say scientists

In findings that could influence our understanding of climate change, a Princeton University research team has learned that tropical forests return to the atmosphere up to half the nitrogen they receive each year, thanks to a particular type of bacteria that live in those forests.

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Course teaches ways to turn conflict into positive change

Conflict is a normal part of life that can be difficult and distressing, but ultimately can lead to positive changes if handled properly. That is the message Camilo Azcarate has been imparting to members of the campus community since becoming the University’s ombuds officer in August 2003. Azcarate has worked with several campus offices on conflict management training programs, which have been so well received that his office is now offering courses on the subject to all faculty, staff and students.

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Tropical forests leak nitrogen back into atmosphere, say scientists

In findings that could influence our understanding of climate change, a Princeton University research team has learned that tropical forests return to the atmosphere up to half the nitrogen they receive each year, thanks to a particular type of bact...

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English professor gives voice to unknown women writers from the 1600s

Nigel Smith is intent on correcting an injustice. It may be more than four centuries old, but for him, it is high time to make amends. A professor of English, Smith is on a mission to bring to light the work of notable British women authors from the 17th century whose writing has been lost over time. In many cases, the work — poems, plays and fiction — was never published and exists only in manuscript form.

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Hinderer honored by Austrian president

Walter Hinderer, a professor of German at Princeton, has been awarded the Austrian Cross of Honor for Science and the Arts by Austrian President Heinz Fischer.

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Nine win Spirit of Princeton awards

Nine students have been named winners of the 2006 Spirit of Princeton awards, which honor undergraduates for their positive contributions to campus life. 

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Tilghman implements changes to support diversity efforts

In response to recommendations by the University's Diversity Working Group, President Shirley M. Tilghman has implemented a number of changes intended to make Princeton a more diverse and welcoming workplace for people of all backgrounds. 

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Massey wins Blackwell-Tapia Prize

William Massey, the Edwin Wilsey Professor of Operations Research and Financial Engineering at Princeton, has been awarded the 2006 Blackwell-Tapia Prize.

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Conference examines intellectual property law, May 18-20

Scholars and practitioners in the sciences, the arts and technology will convene on campus for the Princeton University-Microsoft Intellectual Property Conference, scheduled for Thursday through Saturday, May 18-20.

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Welders help students turn up the heat in architecture course

Welders from the University's heating, ventilation and air conditioning shop spent several hours over two weeks in May working with students enrolled in a junior studio design course, "Dynamical Logics in Architecture." Some of the students who chose to build metal chairs for their final projects received hands-on lessons in metal cutting and welding from the University's skilled tradesmen.

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Wuthnow: Myths distort true picture of the American dream

Princeton sociologist Robert Wuthnow takes a probing look at whether America is living up to its most vaunted ideals in his new book, “American Mythos: Why Our Best Efforts To Be a Better Nation Fall Short.” The book investigates how traditional narratives about the American experience — and their visions of moral responsibility, individualism, religion and diversity — compare to reality.

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Morrison's 'Beloved' named best fiction in the last 25 years

The New York Times Book Review has named "Beloved," a 1987 novel by Princeton Professor Toni Morrison, the best work of American fiction published in the past quarter century. 

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Office of Admission to assume oversight of Orange Key

To help position the Orange Key Guide Service to share information with campus visitors about new initiatives taking shape at Princeton University, administrative responsibility for the guide service will move to the Office of Admission this month.

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'Art of Science' exhibition bridges disciplines

The University's second annual "Art of Science" exhibition, highlighted by three winning student entries, is now on display in the hallway of the Friend Center's main floor.

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Four honored for their work mentoring graduate students

Four Princeton faculty members have been named the recipients of Graduate Mentoring Awards by the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning: Charles Beitz, professor of politics; Stefan Bernhard, assistant professor of chemistry; William Gleason, associate professor of English; and Paul Prucnal, professor of electrical engineering.

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Two students win International Service Award

Graduate student Tanya De Mello and junior Julia Neubauer have been named winners of the 2006 International Service Award by the University's International Center.

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Sinfonia orchestra to perform, May 11

The Princeton University Sinfonia, a student-conducted chamber orchestra, will perform at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 11, in Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall.

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Pandemic influenza information available

Emergency guidelines and other information about pandemic influenza are now available on the University's Emergency Preparedness Web site. 

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Credit union moving to Carnegie and Frist centers, May 22

The Princeton University Federal Credit Union will move to a new off-campus office at 104 Carnegie Center and increase its service offerings at the Frist Campus Center beginning Monday, May 22.

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Six win '78 Community Service Fellowships

Six Princeton students have been awarded Class of 1978 Community Service Fellowships to support their work in a variety of service projects this summer.

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Tracing jazz’s evolution from the club to the classroom

In 1975, legendary trumpeter Miles Davis famously declared, “Jazz is dead.” For Princeton senior Megan Summers, a budding jazz historian, Davis’ pronouncement helped inspire her thesis research into the development of jazz education in America.

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Through images and words, Dale winner will explore Old West

Princeton senior Mimi Chubb quickly grew fascinated with horses, cowboy gear and other symbols of the “authentic” American West after moving cross-country to Irvine, Calif., at age 11. She will engage these interests through a year of traveling and writing about Western imagery as the 2006 winner of the Martin Dale Fellowship.

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Tilghman appoints group to examine staff diversity issues

President Tilghman has asked a group of University staff members to identify proactive strategies and potential barriers that affect the recruitment, hiring, retention and promotion of a diverse workforce at Princeton.

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Triangle Club presents 'Rude Olympics VIII," May 11-13

The Princeton Triangle Club will perform "Rude Olympics VIII: An Eye for an iPod" at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, May 11-13, in the Frist Campus Center theater.

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Searching for life elsewhere in the solar system — from campus

While Princeton students get help from their advisers on planning their senior project, James Wray has known the essence of what he wanted to study since he became old enough to look at the sky and wonder if anyone was looking back. “Life elsewhere in the cosmos is probably something everyone thinks about at one time or another when they’re a kid, but I’m one of those kids who never stopped,” said Wray, who is set to finish his degree in astrophysics later this spring. “After years of working toward it, I’ve finally got the chance to work with other astronomers on a project that could help us find it.”

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Cell action hinges on one-on-one communication

Curious about the way networks of nerve cells work together to transmit messages, a research group at Princeton has been exploring the communication style of retinal ganglion cells, the neurons that line the back walls of our eyes and transmit everything we know about the visual world from eye to brain.

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Pierce to perform Biber's 'Mystery Sonatas,' May 20

Lillian Pierce, a 2002 Princeton alumna who was co-concertmaster of the Princeton University Orchestra, will present a free concert at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 20, in the Rockefeller Hall Common Room.

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Art of Science exhibit opens, May 10

The opening of the second annual "Art of Science" exhibition is scheduled for 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 10, with a reception in the Friend Center atrium.  

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Wagner to discuss 'Large-area Electronics,' May 10

Sigurd Wagner, Princeton professor of electrical engineering, will present the sixth Plasma Science and Technology Distinguished Speaker Lecture at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 10, in 105 Computer Science Building. His talk is titled "Large-area Electronics."

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Former Nobel official to discuss prizes, May 10

Erling Norrby, former secretary-general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, will speak on "Over 100 Years of Nobel Prizes" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 10, in 101 Icahn Lab.

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Wind ensemble presents outdoor concert, May 6

The Princeton University Wind Ensemble will present a free outdoor concert at 9 p.m. Saturday, May 6, on 1879 Green. 

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Grad School sees diversity rise in applications

Princeton's Graduate School admitted 1,122 of the 8,614 applicants who applied for the 2006-07 academic year, and 23 percent of those admitted were underrepresented minorities and women applying to the fields of science and engineering.

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Women's football clinic benefits cancer research, May 7

The University's fifth annual women's football clinic, which benefits breast cancer research, is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 7, at Princeton Stadium.  

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Vibraphonist to join jazz groups in concert, May 13

Renowned jazz vibraphonist Bryan Carrott will join the Princeton University Concert Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Composers Collective in a concert at 8 p.m. Saturday, May 13, in Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall. 

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Holt to discuss Katrina response, May 5

U.S. Rep. Rush Holt will discuss the federal response to Hurricane Katrina and issues of social inequity in a talk scheduled for noon Friday, May 5, outside Firestone Library.

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Gospel ensemble to perform, May 7

The Princeton University Gospel Ensemble will present its annual spring concert at 6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 7, in the Nassau Christian Center, located at 26 Nassau St. 

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New engineering center to transform sensor technology

The National Science Foundation has funded a multimillion-dollar engineering research center based at Princeton University that is expected to revolutionize sensor technology, yielding devices that have a unique ability to detect minute amounts of chemicals found in the atmosphere, emitted from factories or exhaled in human breath. 

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Campus, community connect for Communiversity celebration

Sunshine and warm temperatures on Saturday, April 29, attracted a large crowd to the 2006 Communiversity celebration, which annually brings the town and University together for a day of performances, food, games and more. Set up on Nassau and Wither...

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Space professionals here for Human Spaceflight Forum, May 10

Several distinguished members of the U.S. space program, including the only scientist to walk on the moon, will participate in a Human Spaceflight Forum on Wednesday, May 10.  

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Library acquires archives of prominent literary magazine

The archives of The Hudson Review, one of the most distinguished and influential American literary magazines, will permanently reside in the Princeton University Library.

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Stone named Gilder Lehrman History Scholar

Princeton junior Charles Stone is one of 15 students nationwide chosen to participate in an intensive summer program sponsored by the New York-based Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Drama troupe offers preview of fall show, May 6

Black Arts Company: Drama will present excerpts from its upcoming production of "The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World" at 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6, in the Frist Campus Center theater. 

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Discussion by Oregon senator canceled, May 1

The policy discussion by U.S. Sen. Gordon Smith of Oregon scheduled for 4:30 p.m. Monday, May 1, has been canceled. The lecture was to be sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. 

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Breyer: Constitution views liberty as active citizenship

Navigating the myriad issues facing the U.S. Supreme Court, Justice Stephen Breyer told a Princeton audience on April 30 that the constitutional view of liberty is based upon participation in the democratic system, rather than protection from government interference in individuals' lives. 

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