News at Princeton

Wednesday, Oct. 01, 2014
 

Archive – January, 2007

Princeton student Alexander Adam dies

Princeton undergraduate Alexander Adam died of cancer Jan. 25 at his family's home in New York City. He was 23.

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Research Notes - Winter 2007

Welcome to Research Notes, an online publication highlighting recent Princeton University research in the physical and social sciences, engineering, and the humanities. Research summarized here for which full online articles are available is listed

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Connelly to speak on women in ancient Greece, Feb. 8

Art historian and archaeologist Joan Breton Connelly will discuss women's roles in ancient Greece in a lecture scheduled for 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 8, in McCosh 50.  

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Expo set on spring break, summer camps, Feb. 8

University families can learn more about upcoming opportunities for their children at the Spring Break and Summer Camp Expo from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 8, in the Frist Campus Center Multipurpose Rooms B and C. 

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Tiger Tomes takes up Shapiro book

"Tiger Tomes: Princeton's Online Book Club" continues this spring with a book on higher education's place in society.  

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Online aid available for foreign policy archives

The Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library has completed its arrangement of the records of the Council on Foreign Relations, the influential American foreign policy organization, and has made an electronic finding aid available on its website for researchers.

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Wilson School expands Scholars in the Nation's Service Initiative

Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs is expanding the Scholars in the Nation's Service Initiative, a highly selective scholarship program designed to encourage more of the nation's top students to pursue careers in the U.S. federal government, especially in the field of international relations. 

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Map of Princeton's Whitman College

A map of Whitman College. 

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A window onto Princeton's Whitman College

A tour of Whitman College that begins with a bird's-eye view from the top floor of Lauritzen Hall reveals the massive scope of this project.

Construction of the University's sixth residential college, at 255,000 square feet, is the largest single building project undertaken by the University in many years, according to John Ziegler, assistant to the vice president for facilities and project director. Work began in 2004 and will be finished in time for occupancy this fall.

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Service set for Richard Golden, Jan. 25

A funeral service for Richard Golden, former associate dean for administration of Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science, will be held at noon Thursday, Jan. 25, at the Jewish Center at 435 Nassau St. in Princeton. He died at his home in Princeton early Wednesday morning at age 76. 

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Female athletes host sports fair, Feb. 3

The University's eighth annual celebration of National Girls and Women in Sports Day is set for Saturday, Feb. 3, at Jadwin Gymnasium.

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'Science on Saturday' lectures run through March 17

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's annual "Science on Saturday" program -- a series of seven talks ranging from the science and application of global positioning system technology to the study of burning plasmas -- is scheduled for Jan. 27 through March 17.

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Rare exhibition of Hudson River artist on view

"Treasures From Olana: Landscapes by Frederic Edwin Church," featuring 18 paintings never before exhibited together outside the artist's Hudson Valley estate, will open at the Princeton University Art Museum on Saturday, Jan. 27.

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Princeton experts applaud increased focus on alternative energy

The support for alternative energy production in President Bush's State of the Union Address Tuesday and House Speaker Pelosi's remarks Friday at the National Press Club has elicited a call to action from Princeton's scientific community, which has many experts dedicated to developing fusion power and a large number of other clean, renewable fuel sources. 

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Former Congressman Leach joins Wilson School faculty

Jim Leach, a former Republican Congressman from Iowa, will join the faculty of Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Leach will have a three-semester appointment through June 2008 as the John L. Weinberg/Goldman Sachs and Co. Visiting Professor of Public and International Affairs, beginning in February. 

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Power restored to all buildings

Crews worked through the night to restore power to all University buildings affected by Tuesday's outage. An e-mail was sent at 5 a.m. Wednesday by the facilities department noting that services, including electricity, heat and hot water, have been restored to all dormitories and administrative buildings affected by the outage, which occurred early Tuesday afternoon. 

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Power outage affecting campus buildings -- UPDATED 8 PM

University officials are making accommodations for students affected by a power outage that occurred on campus early Tuesday afternoon.

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Power outage affecting several campus buildings

The University is experiencing a power outage that affects several buildings on campus.

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Mix of interests opens doors for student on campus and abroad

Hans Rinderknecht refuses to be pigeonholed. A physics major with an interest in cosmology, the Princeton junior also is fascinated with the study of dance, theater, music and languages. And he's found a way to combine these divergent pursuits into an extraordinary educational experience.

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Vayansky selected as director of Richardson

Delia Vayansky, a member of Princeton University's Richardson Auditorium staff since 2004, has been named director of the facility. 

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Trustees hold the line on tuition, approve funding for key initiatives

At their Jan. 21 meeting, Princeton University's trustees adopted a 2007-08 operating budget that holds tuition at its current level but raises undergraduate room and board rates for an overall fee increase of 4.2 percent. This is the first year since 1967-68 that the annual tuition rate has not increased. The overall fee increase is well below last year's overall increase of 4.9 percent and the previous year's increase of 5 percent.

The operating budget includes funding for a new child-care benefit for faculty and staff, which is part of a larger effort to make Princeton a more "family-friendly" environment. It also includes, among other initiatives, increased funds for special salary adjustments for faculty and staff, financial support for Ph.D. students who bear children, provision of a winter break allowance for international undergraduates, and 24-hour, seven-day-per-week onsite monitoring of the University's computing systems.  

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Campus plan website updated

The website created for the University's campus planning effort has been updated with all of the comprehensive information presented at last fall's open forum for the campus and local communities. 

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Tilghman awarded genetics society medal

Princeton President Shirley M. Tilghman, a world-renowned scholar and leader in the field of molecular biology, has been awarded the Genetics Society of America Medal. The award is presented annually by the society in recognition of a scientist's outstanding contributions in the field of genetics for the past 15 years.  

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Exhibition presents diverse views on 'What's Sacred'

A collection of photographs representing diverse interpretations of sacred imagery is on view in a new exhibition in the Murray-Dodge Hall lobby. The exhibition, titled "What's Sacred? Princeton Views," includes 35 photographs by campus community members taken on campus and around the world. They were selected from some 160 photographs submitted in response to a call by the exhibition's organizers for images that address the question of "what is sacred?"

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Princeton Prize applications due Jan. 31

Applications are due Wednesday, Jan. 31, for the Princeton Prize in Race Relations, an awards program for high school students who are doing exceptional work in their schools or communities to advance the cause of race relations.

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King Day celebrates music's inspirational power

Princeton University honored the memory of Martin Luther King Jr. on Jan. 15 in Richardson Auditorium with a celebration of the inspirational power of music. The annual King Day ceremony featured a performance by acclaimed jazz guitarist Stanley Jordan, a 1981 Princeton graduate, and a keynote address by Princeton scholar Daphne Brooks, who traced music's central role in African Americans' struggle for equality from the days of slavery to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

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Jan. 15 King Day celebration focuses on music

The University will commemorate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with its annual King Day celebration at 1 p.m. Monday, Jan. 15, in Richardson Auditorium of Alexander Hall.

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Socolow selected for engineering future group

The National Academy of Engineering has named Robert Socolow, Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, to a prestigious international committee to identify the greatest challenges and opportunities for engineering in the 21st century.  

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'Four Rooms Waking' weaves tales of war and liberation, Jan. 11-14

Tales of war and liberation from four countries are the focus of "Four Rooms Waking," a senior thesis production presented by the Program in Theater and Dance at 8 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, Jan. 11-14, at the Matthews Acting Studio, 185 Nassau St.

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Scientists find potential 'off-switch' for HIV

While there is no cure for lingering viral infections such as HIV and herpes, a recent study at Princeton University suggests it may be possible to deactivate such viruses indefinitely with the flick of a genetic switch. 

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Clothing drive set for Jan. 17-24

Members of the University community are reminded that the annual clothing drive to benefit the Hire Attire Boutique is scheduled for Jan. 17-24. 

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Letter to the editor of the New York Sun

This letter to the editor was published in the Jan. 9, 2007, New York Sun:

Andrew Ferguson’s Dec. 26 column about the lawsuit brought against Princeton University more than four years ago by some members of the Robertson family acknowledges the weaknesses of the Robertsons’ “tricky” legal case, but argues that the case is nonetheless important because of the questions it raises about “donor intent.”  

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Project brings new talent into focus for Princeton staff member

What started out as a fundraiser for a nearby historical society has turned into a collaborative learning experience between a faculty member and a staff member at Princeton.

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Szabó earns prize from mathematical society

Zoltán Szabó, a professor of mathematics at Princeton, has been awarded the 2007 Oswald Veblen Prize in Geometry. The prize, one of the highest distinctions for work in geometry or topology, is presented every three years by the American Mathematical Society.  

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University to host Science Olympiad, Jan. 9

On Tuesday, Jan. 9, the University will host the regional tournament of the New Jersey Science Olympiad, a test of science knowledge and aptitude for more than 500 middle school and high school students.  

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Life of Emma Lazarus provides inspiration for Princeton’s Schor

Many Americans don’t recognize Emma Lazarus’ name, but nearly all of them are familiar with her most famous piece of writing, penned in 1883:

“Give me your tired, your poor, “Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free. …”

These words, from a sonnet engraved on a plaque inside the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty, have been immortalized in America’s consciousness. But who is the woman who wrote them? Esther Schor, a professor of English at Princeton and a poet, set out to answer that question in a new biography titled “Emma Lazarus,” published by Nextbook/Schocken.

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Legendary coach Carril again a presence at Princeton

Time, and lots of it, have marched by since Pete Carril last spent a winter without a basketball team to coach. Fifty-three years worth. There were 12 years as a Pennsylvania high school coach, the 29 years at Princeton, then a 10-year hitch as an assistant coach with the Sacramento Kings. These days, he spends much of his time back in Jadwin Gym.

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Rabinowitz approaches science from dual perspective

Josh Rabinowitz has a scientific background that allows him to work in both the industrial and academic worlds, and sometimes the biggest challenge for a person like him can be finding the best fit.

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Borsch named interim dean of religious life

Frederick Borsch, dean of religious life and the chapel at Princeton University from 1981 to 1988, will return to that role on an interim basis, effective Feb. 1.  

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Martin Kruskal, pre-eminent mathematician, dies at age 81

Martin Kruskal, one of the world's pre-eminent applied mathematicians and mathematical physicists, died Dec. 26 in Princeton at age 81.  

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BodyHype presents show, Jan. 11-13

The BodyHype Dance Company will present its fall semester show Thursday through Saturday, Jan. 11-13, in the Hamilton-Murray Theater. The dance troupe will perform at 10 p.m. on Jan. 11-12, and at 7 and 10 p.m. on Jan. 13. 

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Sloan team on a quest for the universe's 'rare birds'

High on a forested New Mexico peak sits a metallic box whose appearance calls to mind a large air-conditioning unit, or a cargo container lifted from a ship's hold. It is perhaps appropriate that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey telescope looks unorthodox when compared to the other telescopes at the Apache Point Observatory, for the Sloan has done a great deal to change our understanding of what the universe looks like.

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