News at Princeton

Friday, Dec. 19, 2014
 

Archive – May, 2008

Graduate students lauded as excellent teachers

The Princeton Graduate School has given awards to six graduate students in recognition of their outstanding abilities as teachers. The annual Association of Princeton Graduate Alumni Teaching Awards are sponsored by the graduate alumni and are selected by the Graduate School administration. The five 2008 winners are Abigail Heald and Briallen Hopper, both of the English department, Patrick Murphy of the electrical engineering department, Mary Steffel of the psychology department and James L. Wilson of the politics department.

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Alumni back to connect with friends, unite for a cause

Some 20,000 alumni and their families began arriving on campus Thursday, May 29, to reconnect with old friends, sample intellectual fare and march in the P-rade as part of Princeton's Reunions activities. 

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University plans new child care center

Princeton University plans to build a new child care facility that would almost double the number of spaces available for infants and toddlers, where need is the greatest.

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Diversity Council formed to carry forward work from report and survey

The University has formed a new Diversity Council to advise the offices of the provost and executive vice president on diversity-related matters. The council, composed of 28 staff members, will build upon the foundations laid by the Diversity Working Group. It is co-chaired by Lianne Sullivan-Crowley, vice president for human resources, and Terri Harris Reed, vice provost for institutional equity and diversity. 

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Princeton honors outstanding secondary school teachers

Princeton University will honor four exceptional New Jersey secondary school teachers at its 2008 Commencement on Tuesday, June 3. This year's honorees are Michelle Di Giovanni, Clinton Township Middle School, Clinton; Elsa Matos, Science Park High School, Newark; Justin Smith, Cherokee High School South, Marlton; and Sara Solberg, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City.  

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Dale winner will undertake highly personal study of mental illness

Through a deeply personal exploration of mental illness, senior Joshua Blaine hopes to use his Martin Dale Fellowship to illuminate a subject that many people consider taboo. During the next year Blaine will undertake an anthropological study of his experience with bipolar disorder, as the winner of the Dale Fellowship. The $27,500 prize is awarded annually to allow a graduating senior "to devote the year following graduation to an independent project of extraordinary merit that will widen the recipient's experience of the world and significantly enhance his or her personal growth and intellectual development."  

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Frist hosts summer concert series

Wednesdays, June 11 through July 16, 2008, 4:30 p.m. · Frist Campus Center south lawn

The Frist Campus Center will present six concerts this summer at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesdays from June 11 through July 16 on its south lawn.

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Hollander to be honored in Italy

Princeton professor emeritus Robert Hollander will be honored with a Gold Florin award by the city of Florence, Italy, on May 30 for his translation of Dante Alighieri's "The Divine Comedy." Hollander will share the honor with his wife, Joan, with whom he collaborated.

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'Iron Tiger' final showdown

This clip introduces the Iron Tiger showdown, in which Dining Services chefs showed off their culinary prowess. The top teams competed during Fristfest.

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Grounded in classics, valedictorian Squire excels in many fields

Princeton senior Zachary Squire was first drawn to the field of classics by a fascination, shared by many youngsters, with Greek and Roman mythology. That early interest eventually grew into a broader appreciation of the study of ancient civilizations. While Squire found outlets for his varied interests within Princeton's classics department, he also excelled in courses across the University -- charting a well-rounded path to becoming valedictorian of the class of 2008. Squire will deliver the valedictory address at Princeton's Commencement ceremony on June 3.  

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Chemical engineer's love of Latin leads to salutatorian selection

As a chemical engineering major, James Morrison has earned the top ranking in the department and a reputation among his professors as one of the most impressive students they have taught at Princeton. But it is Morrison's love of Latin that will be highlighted at Princeton's Commencement ceremony on June 3, when he will deliver the traditional Latin address as the salutatorian of the class of 2008. 

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PPPL to phase out compact stellarator experiment, upgrade spherical torus program

The Princeton Plasma Physics Lab (PPPL) will phase out construction of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and instead ensure the lab's future as a world-leading center of fusion energy and plasma sciences by enhancing its flagship program, the National Spherical Torus Experiment. The new approach is being implemented at the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, which funds the lab managed by Princeton University.

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Commencement events scheduled for June 1-3

Sunday through Tuesday, June 1-3, 2008, various times · various locations

Several University activities for undergraduate and graduate degree candidates and their families are planned for Sunday through Tuesday, June 1-3.

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From science to security, Mahmoud aims to improve global health

After a quarter-century in academic medicine and eight years at the helm of Merck Vaccines, joining the faculty at Princeton was the most compelling next step for global health expert Adel Mahmoud.

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Press kit for supernova discovery now available

The press kit containing images and press releases related to Princeton scientist Alicia Soderberg and her colleagues becoming the first astronomers to witness the explosion of a star is now available online.

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Seeing stars: Princeton University scientists witness once-in-a-lifetime event

When she peered into the screen of her computer one day in January, Alicia Soderberg was supposed to see a small, dull glowing smudge in one corner, the evidence of a month-old supernova that would help her better understand the mystery of these huge exploding stars. Instead, she and her Princeton University colleague Edo Berger became the first astronomers to catch a star in the act of exploding. The once-in-a-lifetime event, described in a paper published in the May 22 issue of Nature, has transfixed the worldwide astronomical community.  

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Levin chosen as member of Italian academic institute

Princeton ecologist Simon Levin, who has made major contributions in the areas of biological conservation and ecosystem management, has been selected as a foreign member of the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, a venerable Italian academic institute. 

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Three elected to American Philosophical Society

Three Princeton scholars are among 38 people recently elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society.

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Visual arts exhibition highlights student work

Weekdays, May 19 through June 4, 2008, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. · 185 Nassau St.

A sprawling exhibition of artwork by students in the Program in Visual Arts in the Lewis Center for the Arts will be on view from May 19 through June 4 at 185 Nassau St. "Student Art: Work From the Spring 2008 Semester" highlights selected pieces from each of the courses offered this spring, including installations, paintings, ceramics, sculptures, photographs, drawings, and intaglio and relief prints.

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New archive features recordings of world leaders in historic policy meetings

Off-the-record remarks by heads of state and prominent diplomats can be heard in sound recordings of meetings held by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) that are now available to researchers online through the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library. The digital audio from the meetings can be accessed via an electronic finding aid on the library's website.

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Piglia to receive French literary prize

Princeton faculty member Ricardo Piglia, considered one of the most outstanding Latin American contemporary writers, will receive the 2008 Premio Roger Caillois, a prestigious French literary prize.

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Book examines economics of life choices among young adults

Young Americans are taking longer to finish college, buy homes and get married, delaying the signature events that social scientists have used to identify adulthood. In "The Price of Independence: The Economics of Early Adulthood," a new volume co-edited by Princeton economist Cecilia Rouse, a team of scholars from around the country explores the trends that have developed among 18- to 35-year-olds over the past 10 to 15 years.

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Harvey brings lively beat of African dance to Princeton

An African drumbeat filled the Hagan Dance Studio. "Reach up! Reach up!" instructor Dyane Harvey announced. Twenty-two students arrayed in rows before the mirrors stretched their arms to the ceiling to warm up. Next the students dispersed to spots along either side of the room, and one student began singing an African chant. The others soon joined in, and their singing and clapping was accompanied by rhythmic stomps, head tosses, energetic leaps and shimmying shoulders. This is a studio course called "The American Dance Experience and Africanist Dance Practices" -- and it is two hours of exuberant, joyous movement.

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Media advisory: Princeton Commencement to be held June 3

Members of the news media who wish to attend any of Princeton University's 2008 graduation ceremonies Sunday through Tuesday, June 1-3, must contact the University's Office of Communications no later than 3 p.m. Friday, May 23, to request credentials.

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Alcohol Coalition Committee issues strategic plan on high-risk drinking

After four months of work, Princeton's Alcohol Coalition Committee (ACC) has issued a strategic plan to address high-risk drinking among undergraduates. The report recommends a structure to sustain the ACC’s efforts, identifies ideas in five strategic areas for further review, describes three initiatives that have already been launched and calls for the collection of data that could provide direction for the future. Made up mostly of students but also including faculty and staff, the committee presented its report to the Healthier Princeton Advisory Board on May 9.

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Inspiring efforts to improve race relations

Winners of the 2008 Princeton Prize in Race Relations present their projects at the first-ever Princeton Prize Symposium on Race.

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Groves earns Frontiers in Biological Chemistry Award

John Groves, the Hugh Stott Taylor Chair in Chemistry, will receive the Frontiers in Biological Chemistry Award for 2009 from the Max Planck Institute for Bioinorganic Chemistry in Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany.

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Inspiring efforts to improve race relations

Projects recognized by the Princeton Prize in Race Relations -- which honors high school students' efforts to improve race relations in their schools or communities -- were presented at the first-ever Princeton Prize Symposium on Race recently held on the University campus.

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Three Princetonians elected to arts and letters academy

Two Princeton faculty members and one alumnus are among the eight new members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. They were selected for reaching the "highest level of artistic achievement."

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Workshop to explore 'Future of News' in the age of technology

Wednesday and Thursday, May 14-15, 2008, various times · Friend Center convocation room

Leading thinkers about the business, practice and consumption of journalism will participate in a public workshop Wednesday and Thursday, May 14-15, to discuss how the Internet and digital technology are remaking the news business.

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Vigil planned for Myanmar

Saturday, May 10, 2008, 5 p.m. · University Chapel

A vigil for the people of Myanmar, where a deadly cyclone hit on May 3, is planned for 5 p.m. Saturday, May 10, in the University Chapel.

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What's bugging locusts? It could be they're hungry -- for each other

Since ancient times, locust plagues have been viewed as one of the most spectacular events in nature. In seemingly spontaneous fashion, as many as 10 billion critters can suddenly swarm the air and carpet the ground, blazing destructive paths that bring starvation and economic ruin. What makes them do it? A team of scientists led by Iain Couzin of Princeton University and including colleagues at the University of Oxford and the University of Sydney believes it may finally have an answer to this enduring mystery. 

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Four honored for their work mentoring graduate students

Four Princeton faculty members have been named the recipients of Graduate Mentoring Awards by the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning and will be honored during the Graduate School's hooding ceremony on Monday, June 2.

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Talk focuses on 'Alternatives to Embryonic Stem Cells'

Friday, May 16, 2008, 4:30 p.m. · 219 Burr Hall

Markus Grompe, a faculty member at Oregon Health and Science University, will speak on "Alternatives to Embryonic Stem Cells" at 4:30 p.m. Friday, May 16, in 219 Burr Hall. 

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Project goes high-tech to unearth ancient history

There is a small hill in a remote part of Turkey that looms large in the mind of John Haldon, a professor of history at Princeton. It likely is the ruin of an ancient fortress, but for Haldon the site is an inspiration to find new ways to unearth the history of a particular landscape.

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Rainfall and river networks prove accurate predictors of fish biodiversity

Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams.

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Professor Rodríguez-Iturbe discusses new fish diversity model

This interview is based on a paper published in the journal Nature on May 8, 2008.

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World premiere of Westergaard's 'Alice' set

May 22, June 3-4, 2008, 8 p.m. · Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall, and New York

A cast of seven will play 38 roles. Twelve English handbells, along with a few whistles, tambourines, drums and other percussion paraphernalia, will make up the orchestra. A projection system will create the special effects needed for the vastly changing size of the set. The world premiere of "Alice in Wonderland" is set for 8 p.m. Thursday, May 22, in Richardson Auditorium of Alexander Hall at Princeton University. At 8 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, June 3-4, the opera will be performed at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater in Symphony Space, Broadway at 95th Street in New York.

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President of UMDNJ to speak on health care

Thursday, May 8, 2008, 4 p.m. · Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall

Dr. William Owen Jr., president of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), will speak on "Health Care in New Jersey: The Role of the Public Medical University" at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 8, in Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall.

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Princeton faculty admitted to National Academy of Sciences

Three Princeton faculty members have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences this year. They are among 72 new members and 18 foreign associates chosen in recognition of their distinguished and continuing accomplishments in original research.

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Women's softball team wins league title

The Princeton softball team won the Ivy League title with 4-2 and 5-1 victories over Harvard on May 3. 

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Eye of the Tiger: Christian Staehely

An excerpt from the Princeton Athletics video series featuring scholar athletes. 

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Nunokawa thrives on serendipity of college master's role

In 20 years as a professor at Princeton, Jeff Nunokawa has filled many roles, but students and colleagues agree he is ideally suited to his latest one: master of Rockefeller College. "When Jeff was asked to be master, I thought, 'Of course!'" said James Richardson, professor of creative writing in the Lewis Center for the Arts and the Department of English. "He radiates enough social energy to power a small city, but more than that, it's his responsiveness and receptiveness. He is always listening to people."

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Service for Fagles planned for May 29

Thursday, May 29, 2008, 3 p.m. · University Chapel

A memorial service for Robert Fagles, the Arthur Marks '19 Professor of Comparative Literature Emeritus, is set for 3 p.m. Thursday, May 29, in the University Chapel.  

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Melting defects could lead to smaller, more powerful microchips

As microchips shrink, even tiny defects in the lines, dots and other shapes etched on them become major barriers to performance. Princeton engineers have now found a way to literally melt away such defects, using a process that could dramatically improve chip quality without increasing fabrication cost. 

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Eleven named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Eleven Princeton faculty members have been named fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. They are among 212 leaders in scholarship, business, the arts and public affairs elected this year in recognition of contributions to their respective fields. 

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U.N. official to speak on Palestinian refugees

Tuesday, May 6, 2008, 7:30 p.m. · McCosh 10

Karen AbuZayd, commissioner-general of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency, will deliver a lecture titled "Palestine Refugees: Exile, Isolation and Prospects" at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 6, in McCosh 10. 

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Muldoon and Rodgers receive Behrman Award

Paul Muldoon, the Howard G.B. Clark '21 University Professor in the Humanities, and Daniel Rodgers, the Henry Charles Lea Professor of History, have received Princeton's Behrman Award for distinguished achievement in the humanities. They were honored at a May 3 dinner.

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Sinfonia orchestra to present free concert

Thursday, May 8, 2008, 8 p.m. · Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall

The Princeton University Sinfonia, a student-conducted chamber orchestra, will perform at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 8, in Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall.

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Princeton jazz musicians to perform

Saturday, May 10, 2008, 8 p.m. · Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall

The Princeton University Concert Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Composers Collective will perform at 8 p.m. Saturday, May 10, in Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall. 

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French theater workshop presents 'Le Misanthrope'

Thursday and Friday, May 8-9, 2008, 8 p.m. · Sterling Morton Gallery, Princeton University Art Museum

L'Atelier, Princeton's French theater workshop, will perform Moliere's "Le Misanthrope" at 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, May 8-9, in the Sterling Morton Gallery of the Princeton University Art Museum. 

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Princeton University survey finds 'pain gap'

A novel study that attempts to paint the most accurate and detailed description yet of how Americans experience pain has found that a significant portion of the population -- 28 percent -- are in pain at any given moment and those with less education and lower income spend more of their time in pain. Those in pain are less likely to work or socialize with others and are more inclined to watch television than the pain-free.

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International Service Award to be presented

Monday, May 12, 2008, 5:30 p.m. · 243 Frist Campus Center

Princeton junior Tashfin Samiul Huq and the Princeton University Language Project will receive the 2008 International Service Award, which is presented annually by the Davis International Center to a student or student group in recognition of cross-cultural humanitarian endeavors. The award will be presented at a ceremony at 5:30 p.m. Monday, May 12, in 243 Frist Campus Center. The ceremony is open to the public.

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Conference explores 'Moral Conflict and Free Society'

Monday and Tuesday, May 12-13, 2008, various times · 219 Burr Hall

Scholars will explore questions about how free societies generate and deal with profound and divisive moral questions in a conference scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, May 12-13, in 219 Burr Hall. The conference, titled "Moral Conflict and the Free Society," will run from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. May 12 and 9:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. May 13.

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Lavender, Pan-African, Latino graduation ceremonies set

Saturday, May 10, and Sunday, June 1, 2008, various times · Various locations

Graduating students will be honored at the annual Lavender and Pan-African graduation ceremonies, as well as a new event for Latino graduates, in May and June.

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Faculty, staff blood drive set for May 8-9

Thursday and Friday, May 8-9, 2008, various times · Frist Campus Center Multipurpose Rooms A and B

The American Red Cross Spring Faculty and Staff Blood Drive is set for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, May 8, and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, May 9, in Multipurpose Rooms A and B of the Frist Campus Center.

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Yielding energy solutions and career insights

On a brisk afternoon in March, senior Rochelle Murray delicately holds a test tube in each hand, looking to see how her latest experiment is turning out. This experiment is part of the chemical engineering major's senior thesis, which involves research in a hot area: the transmuting of waste material into clean-burning fuel.

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Ron McCoy named University architect

Ron McCoy, a Princeton graduate alumnus who has worked for the past 27 years as an architect and educator, has been selected as the new University architect.

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Groundwork laid for Campus Club to roll out the welcome mat this fall

A quiet transformation has been taking place on the corner of Washington Road and Prospect Avenue over the last year and a half. But the change is about to become much more visible as construction begins in earnest this spring and Campus Club re-opens its doors this fall as a community space for undergraduate and graduate students. 

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