News at Princeton

Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014

Featured Stories Archive – October, 2011

Exploring the science and nuance of facial perception

Alexander Todorov, an associate professor of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University, uses a wide array of visual aids in his course "The Face: The Forces That Shape How We Perceive Others," which is being offered for the first time this fall. His 15 students are learning about humans' specialized mechanisms for processing, recognizing and socially assessing faces — as well as the biases that lead to errors in perception.

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Video feature: Princeton Freshman Parents Weekend

After Shelley Slaughter delivered her 17-year-old daughter, Ebony Slaughter-Johnson, to Princeton in early September, it was the first time they had spent more than a week apart. Six weeks later, they were happily reunited at Freshman Parents Weekend.

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PPPL scientists bring mysterious magnetic process down to earth

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are recreating magnetic reconnection, one of the most common but least understood phenomena in the universe. The experiments seek to unravel the secrets of magnetic reconnection and ultimately provide benefits including improved prediction of solar outbursts and dangerous geomagnetic storms; increased understanding of the formation of the sun and stars; and greater control of the nuclear fusion reactions that PPPL researchers are studying as a clean fuel for generating electric power.

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Video feature: Princeton at 265

This year marks the 265th anniversary of the signing of Princeton University's charter, which was granted on Oct. 22, 1746. Known as Charter Day, the date is celebrated as the University's birthday. In an era known as "the Great Awakening," the seven founders and early leaders of what was then known as the College of New Jersey believed in challenging orthodoxy and being open to all sources of knowledge. "Princeton at 265," a video documenting celebrations of Charter Day, looks at how this spirit of dissent infuses and informs the University to this day.

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Concussion research aims to help athletes, study of the brain

It's called an invisible injury, yet it affects hundreds of thousands of athletes each year. From professional boxers, college football stars, high school soccer players and kids competing in schoolyard baseball games, concussions can be a significant injury for anyone playing sports. To address the problem, Princeton researchers Annegret Dettwiler-Danspeckgruber and Margot Putukian have spent the past four years studying sports-related concussions, aiming to improve diagnostic tools and help better determine when it's safe for athletes to return to play. Their work is ongoing, but by bridging neuroscience and sports medicine, they are seeking not only to support athletes, but also to illuminate the study of both brain structure and function following concussion.

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Research at Princeton

From the advancement of mathematical theory and sociological understanding to the development of cleaner-burning fuels and novel electronic devices, research at Princeton aims to expand the frontiers of human knowledge and improve societal well-being.

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Princeton's Sims wins Nobel in economics with visiting professor Sargent

A 40-year path of friendly arguments and groundbreaking studies of how governments weigh policies to deal with economic troubles has led a pair of prominent economists to share the 2011 Nobel Prize in their field. Princeton University professor Christopher Sims was honored along with Thomas Sargent, a New York University economist and visiting professor this semester at Princeton, for developing tools to analyze the economic causes and effects of monetary policy. Their work has revolutionized the field of macroeconomics and how it is applied by central banks and governments around the world.

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1:10 P.M. OCT. 10 UPDATE - Princeton's Sims wins Nobel in economics with visiting professor Sargent

Princeton University professor Christopher Sims has been awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in economics along with Thomas Sargent, a New York University economist who is a visiting professor at Princeton, for developing tools to analyze the effect of monetary policy on the economy.

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Student-athletes balance life on and off the field

For the nearly 1,000 students, or about 20 percent of the University's undergraduates, who suit up for Princeton's 38 varsity sports teams, life as a student-athlete poses both opportunities and challenges.

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Featured blog: The Graphic Arts Collection

The Graphic Arts Collection of the Princeton University Library includes more than 22,000 examples from the history of graphic design, printing and binding. Selections are regularly featured in the Milberg Gallery for the Graphic Arts in Firestone Library and on the Graphic Arts blog.

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