News at Princeton

Thursday, July 28, 2016

News Releases

 

Princeton-UCLA study finds gray wolves should remain protected

Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-Los Angeles have investigated the genetic ancestry of North America's wild canines and concluded that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's scientific arguments for removing gray wolves from endangered species protection are incorrect. The study, which contradicts conventional thinking, finds that all of the continent's canids diverged from a common ancestor relatively recently and that eastern and red wolves are not evolutionarily distinct species but a hybrid of gray wolf and coyote ancestry.

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Summer programs extend outreach, learning on Princeton campus

Students of all ages from across the country and world will be engaged in a summer of learning on the Princeton University campus, taking part in programs on subjects ranging from chemistry and combustion energy to music and entrepreneurship.

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Zika virus alerts may have prompted uptick in abortion requests in Latin America

A study co-authored by Princeton University researchers found that pregnant women in Latin American countries were more likely to seek an abortion after receiving health alerts about Zika virus. The findings highlight the need for Latin American women to have access to safe and legal reproductive options, especially as Zika continues to spread.

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After legal-ivory experiment, black markets thrive from greater demand, less risk

Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-Berkeley found that a one-time legal sale of ivory intended to stifle elephant poaching in Africa actually expanded the black market for ivory and led to the slaughter of more elephants. In general, the work suggests that the partial legalization of some illegal products may in fact encourage black-market activity by attracting new customers and by reducing risk for criminals.

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Scoliosis linked to disruptions in spinal fluid flow

A new study in zebrafish by researchers at Princeton University and the University of Toronto suggests that irregular fluid flow through the spinal column brought on by gene mutations is linked to a type of scoliosis that can affect humans during adolescence. Also found in people, these genes damage the hair-like projections called motile cilia that move fluid through the spinal canal and lead to a curvature of the spine.

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Princeton University holds 269th Commencement

Princeton University awarded degrees to 1,291 undergraduates in the Class of 2016, five from former classes and 906 graduate students at its 269th Commencement Tuesday, May 31. The University also awarded honorary degrees to six individuals for their contributions to the humanities, economics, journalism, medicine, law, history and public service.

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PPPL dedicates upgraded fusion reactor, a powerful new 'star on Earth'

Scientists, policymakers and Princeton University administrators gathered May 20 to dedicate the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX-U), an upgraded spherical tokamak fusion reactor. Now the most powerful facility of its kind in the world, the NSTX-U allows researchers around the world to explore how to create fusion reactions that could provide society with clean, reliable, safe and abundant power.

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Princeton part of $40 million Simons Observatory collaboration to investigate the early universe

Princeton University researchers will have an integral role in the Simons Observatory, a new astronomy facility established with a $38.4 million grant from the Simons Foundation. The observatory will investigate cosmic microwave background radiation to better understand the physics and structure of the universe. The observatory's project manager will be located at Princeton, and Princeton faculty will oversee the development, design, testing and manufacture of many of the observatory's camera components.

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More than 1,200 new planets confirmed using new technique for verifying Kepler data

Scientists from Princeton University and NASA have confirmed that 1,284 objects observed outside Earth's solar system by NASA's Kepler spacecraft are indeed planets. The researchers used an automated technique developed at Princeton that allows scientists to efficiently determine if a Kepler signal is caused by a planet. It is the largest single announcement of new planets to date and more than doubles the number of confirmed planets discovered by Kepler so far.

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Unique Pluto, solar wind interactions similar to those of larger planets

The first analysis of Pluto's interaction with the ubiquitous space plasma known as the solar wind found that Pluto has some unique and unexpected characteristics that are less like a comet and more like larger planets.

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New tool puts a consistent value on experts' uncertainty on climate change models

To bridge the gap between projections of future sea-level rise and the need to prepare for it, a Princeton University researcher and collaborators developed a method that consolidates climate models and the range of opinions that leading scientists have about them into a single, consistent set of probabilities.

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Gene behind 'evolution in action' in Darwin's finches identified

Scientists from Princeton University and Uppsala University have identified a specific gene that within a year helped spur a permanent physical change in a finch species in response to a drought-induced food shortage. The findings provide a genetic basis for natural selection that, when combined with observational data, could serve as a comprehensive model of evolution.

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Ocean currents push phytoplankton — and pollution — around the globe faster than thought

Princeton University researchers found that ocean currents can carry objects to almost any place on the globe in less than a decade, faster than previously thought. While good for microorganisms such as phytoplankton that are essential to the marine food web, it also means that plastic debris, radioactive particles and virtually any kind of litter can quickly become a problem in areas far from where they originated.

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Trees' internal water pipes predict which species survive drought

A team including Princeton University researchers has found that tree species that can withstand stress to the water-transport system that carries water from the roots to the crown are less susceptible to drought and massive die-off. The findings could help forestry experts, especially in the American West, create early-warning systems and take precautionary steps to reduce a forest's vulnerability to drought.

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Tidal forces explain how an icy moon of Saturn keeps its 'tiger stripes'

Researchers from Princeton University and the University of Chicago show that the mysterious persistence of the massive fissures known as "tiger stripes" on the surface of Saturn's sixth-largest moon, Enceladus, could be sustained by the sloshing of water in the vast ocean beneath the moon's thick ice shell. The findings could help provide a clear objective for future satellite missions to the Enceladus, which scientists suspect could host life.

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John C. Moore, dedicated and influential Princeton mathematician, dies

Princeton University professor emeritus John C. Moore, described as a committed and influential mathematician, died Jan. 1 in Rochester, New York. He was 92. Moore specialized in algebraic topology and had many important concepts named after him.

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LaTanya Buck named dean for diversity and inclusion

LaTanya Buck, founding director of the Center for Diversity and Inclusion at Washington University in St. Louis, will join Princeton University in August as dean for diversity and inclusion.

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Expanded University bike-share program enhances 'bike culture' for campus and town

Princeton University has built on its commitment of providing sustainable and convenient transportation options for faculty, staff, students and the community by expanding its bike-share program to include a total of 70 bikes available at eight locations around main campus and one on the Forrestal Campus.

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Emily Carter named dean of engineering school at Princeton

Emily A. Carter, a Princeton faculty member since 2004 and founding director of the University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, has been selected as the next dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Her appointment is effective July 1.

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Trustees call for expanded commitment to diversity and inclusion

The Princeton University Board of Trustees has called for an expanded and more vigorous commitment to diversity and inclusion at Princeton, with concerted efforts not only to implement a broad range of existing initiatives, but to take additional actions, including those proposed by a special trustee committee that was appointed last fall to consider the legacy of Woodrow Wilson at Princeton. 

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Novelist Picoult selected as 2016 Class Day speaker

Best-selling novelist and Princeton alumna Jodi Picoult has been selected to deliver the keynote address at the University's Class Day ceremony on Monday, May 30, 2016.

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Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted

The announcement Feb. 11 of the detection of gravitational waves, predicted by Albert Einstein some 100 years ago, created a surge of excitement among physicists worldwide, including many with ties to Princeton University. Researchers hope to use the waves to learn more about black holes and other massive objects in the universe, but also to study how the universe was formed and how gravity behaves.

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McComas named vice president for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

David McComas, an executive leader in managing various complex technical projects and programs, has been named vice president of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). PPPL is the nation's leading center for the exploration of plasma science and magnetic fusion energy. McComas also has been appointed professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton.

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How bacterial communication 'goes with the flow' in causing infection, blockage

New work from Princeton University researchers shows that the effectiveness of bacteria's ability to keep in touch is influenced by the physical characteristics and flow of fluid in the environments they're invading. The findings provide a better understanding of where and when in a system scientists can interfere with bacterial communication to help prevent infections and blockages.  

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Once thought unstoppable, bacterial superweapon falters with too many targets

Researchers from Princeton University and the University of Basel found that a mechanism used by many disease-causing bacteria that was once thought to be a microbial superweapon can be thwarted if the cells being attacked are numerous enough. Combining computer simulations and laboratory work, the research reveals a unique approach to unraveling biological processes and could provide insight into how cells withstand powerful aggressors.

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3-D footage of nematode brains links neurons with motion and behavior

Princeton University researchers developed an instrument that allowed them to capture among the first 3-D recordings of neural activity in nearly the entire brain of a free-moving animal, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The findings could provide scientists with a better understanding of how neurons coordinate action and perception in animals. 

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Levin wins National Medal of Science for unraveling ecological complexity

Simon Levin, Princeton University's George M. Moffett Professor of Biology and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, will receive a National Medal of Science, the nation's highest scientific honor. Levin will be honored at a White House ceremony in early 2016 along with eight fellow Medal of Science recipients and eight recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.

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Princeton offers early action admission to 785 students for Class of 2020

Princeton University has offered admission to 785 students from a pool of 4,229 candidates who applied through single-choice early action for the Class of 2020. The pool was the largest in the last five years, representing a 9.8 percent increase over last year's early applicant pool. The admitted students represent 33 countries, 46 states and the District of Columbia. Forty-two percent of the admitted students are U.S. students from diverse backgrounds and 11 percent are international students.

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Chitchat and small talk could serve an evolutionary need to bond with others

Princeton University research suggests that idle conversation could be a social-bonding tool passed down from primates. The researchers found that lemurs use vocalizations far more selectively than previously thought, primarily exchanging calls with individuals with which they have close relationships. The findings could have implications for how scientists understand the evolution of primate vocalizations and human speech.

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Theory of 'smart' plants may explain the evolution of global ecosystems

In a new global theory of land-biome evolution, Princeton University researchers suggest that plants are not passive features of their environments, but may instead actively behave in ways that determine the productivity and composition of their ecosystems.

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Ants build 'living' bridges with their bodies, speak volumes about group intelligence

Researchers from Princeton University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology report for the first time that the "living" bridges army ants of the species Eciton hamatum build with their bodies are more sophisticated than scientists knew. The ants automatically assemble with a level of collective intelligence that could provide new insights into animal behavior and even help in the development of intuitive robots that can cooperate as a group.

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University, students reach agreement on campus climate concerns

University officials reached agreement Thursday with student demonstrators over a series of steps to improve the campus climate, ending a sit-in at the president’s office in Nassau Hall.

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Quiet 'epidemic' of drugs, alcohol and suicide has killed half a million middle-aged white Americans

Despite advances in health care and quality of life, white middle-aged Americans have seen overall mortality rates increase over the past 15 years, representing an overlooked "epidemic" with deaths comparable to the number of Americans who have died of AIDS, according to new Princeton University research.  

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UN climate summit can't overlook coal-power financing from emerging countries

When global leaders converge on Paris on Nov. 30 for the 2015 United Nations climate change conference, they should create guidelines and incentives for developing nations to cooperate with one another on lower-carbon energy projects, according to a report led by Princeton University researchers. Failure to do so could contribute to an unchecked expansion of coal energy in developing countries.

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Fly brains reveal the neural pathway by which outside stimuli become behavior

Princeton University researchers used fruit fly brains to capture the process by which the brain identifies behaviorally useful information in the external environment and uses it to determine our actions. The results provide a clear diagram of the stimulus-to-behavior neural process that is frequently carried out by human brains, but has been difficult for scientists to study.

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More rain leads to fewer trees in the African savanna

Princeton University researchers might have finally provided a solution to the ecological riddle of why tree abundance on Africa's grassy savannas diminishes in response to heavy rainfall despite scientists' expectations to the contrary. The researchers found that the ability of grasses to more efficiently absorb and process water gives them an advantage over trees. This raises concerns that the heavy tropical rains that could accompany climate change may lead to fewer trees on savannas.

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Angus Deaton receives Nobel Prize in economics

Princeton University professor Angus Deaton has been awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in economics for his contributions to understanding consumption at the individual level and in aggregate. 

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Princeton endowment earns 12.7 percent return

Princeton University's endowment earned a 12.7 percent investment gain for the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2015. The endowment value stood at $22.7 billion, an increase of about $1.7 billion from the previous year. The average annual return on the endowment for the past decade is 10.1 percent.

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Princeton releases survey findings on inappropriate sexual behavior

A recent survey of Princeton University students found a sizeable majority knows where to go on campus for help following an incident of nonconsensual sexual contact, and nearly half of the students surveyed think they can do something about sexual violence on campus. Those were among the many findings of the report "We Speak: Attitudes on Sexual Misconduct at Princeton University."

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Princeton faculty to begin offering courses on edX online platform

Princeton University continues to broaden its online teaching and learning efforts and has become a charter member of the edX Consortium. As a result, millions of learners will have the opportunity to take free classes offered by Princeton faculty on the edX online platform. 

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OCR review finds no evidence of discrimination in admission process

A compliance review of Princeton University's undergraduate admission process by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the U.S. Department of Education has been concluded with a determination that the University did not discriminate against Asian applicants on the basis of race or national origin. The review was based on information provided following two complaints received in 2006 and 2011.

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Gorfine selected as next director of Print and Mail Services

Ashley Gorfine, who has extensive experience in the commercial printing industry, will become the next director of Princeton University's Print and Mail Services. She will start Aug. 17.

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Pletcher named director of medical services at Princeton University

Dr. Jonathan Pletcher, whose career has focused on adolescent and young adult medicine, will become the next director of medical services for Princeton University Health Services (UHS). His appointment is effective Sept. 14.

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After 85-year search, massless particle with promise for next-generation electronics discovered

An international team led by Princeton University scientists has discovered Weyl fermions, elusive massless particles theorized 85 years ago that could give rise to faster and more efficient electronics because of their unusual ability to behave as matter and antimatter inside a crystal.

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Summer outreach programs foster learning on Princeton campus

Students of all ages and teachers from New Jersey and beyond will be engaged in a summer of learning on the Princeton campus, taking part in outreach programs on subjects ranging from leadership and entrepreneurship to computer science, music and journalism.

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Graduate students start moving into Lakeside housing complex

Construction of Princeton University's Lakeside graduate housing complex is complete and students started moving in June 1. The 329-unit complex will be home to more than 700 residents.

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University Place detour to begin June 13

Starting on Saturday, June 13, University Place will be closed to through traffic from College Road to Alexander Street due to work to repair the crosswalk adjacent to the Berlind Theatre. This closure is expected to remain in place for three to four weeks. 

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Princeton awards six honorary degrees

Princeton University awarded honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Tuesday, June 2, to six individuals for their contributions to civil rights, engineering, the law, literature and service to the nation. Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber awarded degrees to Harry Belafonte, social activist and artist; David Billington, the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at Princeton; Ann Dunwoody, retired four-star general of the U.S. Army; Deborah Poritz, lawyer and former chief justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey; John Paul Stevens, retired associate justice of the Supreme Court; and Mario Vargas Llosa, Peruvian novelist and Nobel laureate in literature.

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Students recognized for accomplishments and service at Class Day

Members of Princeton University's Class of 2015 gathered on Cannon Green Monday, June 1, to celebrate the conclusion of their undergraduate careers in a Class Day ceremony honoring their achievements and leadership.

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Monica Ponce de Leon named dean of Princeton's School of Architecture

Monica Ponce de Leon, a pioneering educator and award-winning architect, has been selected as the next dean of Princeton University's School of Architecture. Her appointment is effective Jan. 1, 2016.

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Identifying species imperiled by the wildlife trade may require a trip to the market

Princeton University-led research provides a new weapon in the struggle against the devastating wildlife trade: the very markets where animals are bought and sold. The researchers found that species that are disappearing as a result of the pet trade can be identified by changes in their market prices and trade volumes — increasing prices and decreasing availability could mean that wild populations are plummeting. Regular pet-market monitoring could help indicate when a particular species is in trouble so that measures could be taken to monitor and protect its wild population.

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Gravity data show that Antarctic ice sheet is melting increasingly faster

Princeton University researchers "weighed" Antarctica's ice sheet using gravitational satellite data and found that during the past decade, Antarctica's massive ice sheet lost twice the amount of ice in its western portion compared with what it accumulated in the east. Their conclusion — the southern continent's ice cap is melting ever faster.

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Stegosaurus plates provide first solid evidence that male, female dinosaurs looked different

The discovery of a single anatomical difference between males and females of a species of Stegosaurus provides some of the most conclusive evidence that some dinosaurs looked different based on sex, according to new Princeton University research. Existing work had been inconclusive to the point that some paleontologists began to think that male and female dinosaurs did not differ physically from one another.

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Antibiotic effectiveness imperiled as use in livestock expected to increase 67 percent by 2030

Princeton University-led research found that antibiotic consumption in livestock worldwide could rise by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030, and possibly endanger the effectiveness of antimicrobials in humans.

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A 'long awaited recognition': Nash receives Abel Prize for revered work in mathematics

Princeton University mathematician John Nash received the 2015 Abel Prize from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his seminal work on partial differential equations, which are used to describe the basic laws of scientific phenomena. The award is one of the most prestigious in the field of mathematics and includes an $800,000 prize. Nash shares the prize with longtime colleague Louis Nirenberg, a professor emeritus at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

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No increased meningitis B risk at Princeton

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced this week that the risk of meningitis B at Princeton University is the same as at any other university. Ninety-eight percent of Princeton undergraduates have received at least one dose of the meningitis B vaccine and there have been no cases of serogroup B meningococcal disease occurring on campus or affecting Princeton students since November 2013.

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Ebola outbreak of 2014 may have laid tracks for deadly measles epidemic in Africa

Princeton University and Johns Hopkins University researchers report that the African countries most affected by the 2014 Ebola outbreak could now be highly susceptible to measles epidemics due to severe disruptions in routine health care such as vaccinations.

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Tank receives Brain Prize for advance in microscopy

David Tank, the Henry L. Hillman Professor in Molecular Biology at Princeton, has been named one of four winners of the Brain Prize, an honor that recognizes scientists who have made outstanding contributions to brain research.

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Valerie Smith appointed president of Swarthmore College

Valerie Smith, Princeton University's dean of the college, has been named the next president of Swarthmore College. Swarthmore's Board of Managers approved her appointment Feb. 21. Smith, who is also the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature and a professor of English and African American studies, will remain at Princeton through June 30, the end of the academic year. On July 1, she will assume office at Swarthmore, a top-ranked liberal arts college near Philadelphia.

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Update about suspected measles case and campus services

As directed by the town of Princeton Health Department, Princeton University began notifying certain members of the faculty and staff as of Thursday, Feb. 19, that they must remain off campus until they provide proof of protection against measles. The requirement that some members of the faculty and staff remain off campus has resulted in temporarily reduced staffing levels in some departments and offices on campus. Arrangements have been made to continue providing services.

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Princeton faculty, staff updated on suspected measles case

All members of the Princeton University faculty and staff received the following information Thursday, Feb. 19, regarding the case of a student who contracted a suspected case of measles. The message was sent by Lianne Sullivan-Crowley, vice preside...

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Student has suspected case of measles; additional tests underway

Princeton University notified all undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty members and staff Wednesday, Feb. 18, that a student had contracted a suspected case of measles. Further tests are underway. The student has recovered and is no longer contagious.

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Scheide donates rare books library to Princeton; collection is largest gift in University's history

Musician, musicologist, bibliophile and philanthropist William H. Scheide, a 1936 Princeton University alumnus who died in November at age 100, has left his extraordinary collection of some 2,500 rare printed books and manuscripts to Princeton University. With an expected appraised value of nearly $300 million, it is the largest gift in the University's history.

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A gene that shaped the evolution of Darwin's finches

Researchers from Princeton University and Uppsala University in Sweden have identified a gene in the Galápagos finches studied by English naturalist Charles Darwin that influences beak shape and that played a role in the birds' evolution from a common ancestor more than 1 million years ago. The study illustrates the genetic foundation of evolution, including how genes can flow from one species to another, and how different versions of a gene within a species can contribute to the formation of entirely new species.

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Real-time brain feedback reduces attention lapses

Researchers at Princeton University have found that training people using real-time feedback from their own brain activity can reduce the frequency of attention lapses and improve their ability to sustain attention.

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Nobel laureate and Princeton physicist Val Fitch dies at age 91

A towering figure in physics who helped shape our understanding of the universe, Princeton University emeritus professor and Nobel laureate Val Logsdon Fitch died peacefully Feb. 5 in Princeton, New Jersey. He was 91.

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Tiny termites can hold back deserts by creating oases of plant life

Princeton University research suggests that termite mounds can help prevent the spread of deserts into semi-arid ecosystems and agricultural lands. The results not only suggest that termite mounds could make these areas more resilient to climate change than previously thought, but could also inspire a change in how scientists determine the possible effects of climate change on ecosystems.

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Princeton's annual financial aid budget grows 7.4 percent to $140 million

Princeton University trustees Jan. 31 approved the University's operating budget for 2015-16, which includes a 7.4 percent increase to $140.2 million in the undergraduate financial aid budget for next year. The University's pioneering financial aid program provides the assistance necessary to make sure that any student who is admitted and needs financial aid can attend. The aid comes in the form of grants, which do not need to be repaid.

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Applications for Princeton's Class of 2019 reach record high

Princeton University has received a record 27,259 applications for admission to the Class of 2019. The number, which includes 3,850 candidates who applied last fall through single-choice early action, is now the largest applicant pool in the University's history. The number increased in recent days as previously incomplete applications were processed and added to the total.

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Rice-sized laser, powered one electron at a time, bodes well for quantum computing

Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized microwave laser, or "maser," powered by single electrons that demonstrates the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons. It is a major step toward building quantum-computing systems out of semiconductor materials.

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Women seen as lacking natural 'brilliance' may explain underrepresentation in academia

The stereotype that women lack natural "brilliance" could explain their underrepresentation in academia, according to new research based at Princeton University. The lead author is Sarah-Jane Leslie, the Class of 1943 Professor of Philosophy The researchers surveyed 1,820 faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students, men and women, from 30 disciplines at high-profile public and private research universities nationwide. The study, "Expectations of brilliance underlie gender distributions across academic disciplines," will be published Jan. 16 in the journal Science.  

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University to celebrate King's legacy; Rouse to give keynote

Monday, Jan. 19, 2015, 1 p.m. · Alexander Hall, Richardson Auditorium

Princeton University will commemorate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with its annual King Day celebration on Monday, Jan. 19, in Richardson Auditorium of Alexander Hall. Doors open at 1 p.m. Cecilia Rouse, dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, will give the keynote address.

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Near-record applications for Princeton's Class of 2019

Princeton University has received 26,993 applications for admission to the Class of 2019. The number, which includes 3,850 candidates who applied last fall through single-choice early action, is the second-largest applicant pool in the University's history. Many of the applicants also applied for Princeton's generous financial aid program, which meets the full need of all admitted students and provides students who qualify for aid with grants that do not need to be repaid.

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Princeton satellite successfully heads to the 'edge of space' to study the early universe

SPIDER, a stratospheric spacecraft constructed primarily in Princeton's Jadwin Hall, was successfully launched Jan. 1 from Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf. Borne by a helium-filled balloon, SPIDER will orbit Earth at roughly 120,000 feet for 20 days looking for the pattern of gravitational waves produced by the fluctuation of energy and density that resulted from the Big Bang.

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New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs' extinction

A definitive geological timeline from Princeton University researchers shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago played a role in the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, and challenges the dominant theory that a meteorite impact was the sole cause of the extinction.

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Princeton offers early action admission to 767 students for Class of 2019

Princeton University has offered admission to 767 students from a pool of 3,850 candidates who applied through single-choice early action for the Class of 2019. Princeton's generous financial aid policy meets the full need of all admitted students and provides students who qualify for aid with grants that do not need to be repaid. As a result, 75 percent of Princeton students graduate debt free.

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Lisa P. Jackson, environmental leader, named Baccalaureate speaker

Princeton graduate alumna Lisa Jackson, vice president of environmental initiatives at Apple Inc. and former administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has been selected as the speaker for the University's 2015 Baccalaureate ceremony. 

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Christopher Nolan selected as 2015 Class Day speaker

Film director, screenwriter and producer Christopher Nolan has been selected to deliver the keynote address at the University's Class Day ceremony on Monday, June 1, 2015. Class Day, which takes place the day before Princeton's Commencement, is being organized by members of the graduating class.

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Unique sense of 'touch' gives a prolific bacterium its ability to infect anything

A study led by Princeton University researchers found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism — a sense of touch.

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OCR concludes investigation; new agreement brings Princeton into Title IX compliance

The U. S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has concluded its investigation of Title IX complaints against Princeton University that were filed in 2010 and 2011, and has released a resolution agreement which, according to OCR, "addresses the compliance concerns identified in OCR's investigation and, when fully implemented, will resolve the University’s non-compliance" with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 as it applies to sexual harassment and violence.  

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Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Researchers from Princeton University and other institutions may have hit upon an answer to a climate-change puzzle that has eluded scientists for years, namely why glaciers in the Karakoram range of the Himalayas have remained stable and even increased in mass while glaciers nearby and worldwide have been receding. Understanding the "Karakoram anomaly" could help gauge the future availability of water for hundreds of millions of people.

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Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections

When it comes to the brain, "more is better" seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego recently found an immune-system protein that moonlights in the nervous system to help regulate the number of synapses, and could play an unexpected role in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes and autism.

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Toni Morrison papers to reside at Princeton

The papers of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison are now part of the permanent library collections of Princeton University, where the renowned author served on the faculty for 17 years.

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Princeton endowment earns 19.6 percent return

For the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2014, Princeton University's endowment earned a 19.6 percent investment gain. The endowment value stood at $21.0 billion, an increase of about $2.8 billion from the previous year. The 10-year average return on the endowment, which grew to 10.5 percent, places the University's endowment among the top percentile of 520 institutions reporting to the Trust Universe Comparison Service.

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Pedestrian and bike path between Princeton Station and campus to be closed starting Monday, Oct. 13

Effective Monday, Oct. 13, the pedestrian and bike path between the temporary Princeton Station and the Princeton University campus will close for work related to completion of the new train station.

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Genetic 'instruction set' for antibodies knocks down hepatitis C in mice

A study led by Princeton University researchers found that a triple-punch of antibodies both prevented hepatitis C infection and wiped out the disease after it had established itself in laboratory mice. Instead of delivering the antibodies directly, the researchers administered a genetic "instruction set" that, once in a cell, developed into antibodies that target the portions of the virus that do not mutate.

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Fall foliage season may be later, but longer on warmer Earth

The fall foliage season in some areas of the United States could come much later and possibly last a little longer by the end of the century as climate change causes summer temperatures to linger later into the year, according to Princeton University researchers. The delay could result in a longer growing season that would affect carbon uptake, agriculture, water supplies and animal behavior, among many other areas.

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Southern Ocean's role in climate regulation, ocean health is goal of $21 million federal grant

A six-year, $21 million program by Princeton University and 10 partner institutions will seek to make the importance and health of the Southern Ocean encircling Antarctica better known scientifically and publicly. The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling program, or SOCCOM, will create a biogeochemical and physical portrait of the ocean using an expanded computational capacity and hundreds of robotic floats deployed around Antarctica.

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In one of nature's innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome

A study led by Princeton University researchers found that a pond-dwelling, single-celled organism has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate. This elaborate process could provide a template for understanding how chromosomes in more complex animals such as humans break apart and reassemble, as can happen during the onset of cancer.

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Early cerebellum malfunction hinders neural development, possible root of autism, theory suggests

Princeton University researchers offer a new theory that an early-life injury to the cerebellum disrupts the brain's processing of external and internal information and leads to "developmental diaschisis," wherein a loss of function in one brain region leads to problems in another. Applied to autism, cerebellar injury could hinder how other areas of the brain interpret external stimuli and organize internal processes.

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University Place to reopen on Aug. 28

University Place, which has been closed from College Road to Alexander Street, will reopen to vehicular traffic on the morning of Thursday, Aug. 28.

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Coal's continued dominance of global industrialization must be made more vivid in climate change accounting

The world's accounting system for carbon emissions, run by the United Nations, disregards capital investments in future coal-fired and natural-gas power plants that will commit the world to several decades and billions of tons of greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study from Princeton University and the University of California-Irvine.

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Bhargava receives Fields Medal for influential mathematicians under 40

Princeton University mathematician Manjul Bhargava was awarded the 2014 Fields Medal, one of the most prestigious awards in mathematics, in recognition of his work in the geometry of numbers. The International Mathematical Union (IMU) presents the medal every four years to researchers under the age of 40 based on the influence of their existing work and on their "promise of future achievement."

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Wild sheep show benefits of putting up with parasites

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. The finding could provide the groundwork for boosting the resilience of humans and livestock to infection.

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University Place detour to begin Aug. 2

Starting on Saturday, Aug. 2, University Place will be closed to through traffic from College Road to Alexander Street due to construction of the Princeton University Arts and Transit Project. This closure is expected to remain in place until the end of August. Access for vehicles traveling to the Wawa customer parking lot will be maintained via the roundabout on Alexander Street.

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Brain's dynamic duel underlies win-win choices

People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University.

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Study shows significant increase in antibiotic use across the world

Global use of antibiotics is surging according to Princeton University researchers who have conducted a broad assessment of antibiotic consumption around the world.

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University Place to reopen on July 9

University Place, which has been closed from College Road to Alexander Street, will reopen to vehicular traffic on the morning of Wednesday, July 9.

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Harold Kuhn, Princeton mathematician who advanced game theory, dies at 88

Harold Kuhn, a Princeton mathematician who advanced game theory and brought mathematical approaches to economics, died of congestive heart failure in New York City on July 2. He was 88 years old.

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Becoming an expert takes more than practice

Deliberate practice may have less influence in building expertise than previously thought, according to an analysis by researchers at Princeton University, Michigan State University and Rice University.

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Diabolical duo: Known breast cancer gene needs a partner to initiate and spread tumors

A team led by Princeton University researchers has found that a gene known as Metadherin promotes the survival of tumor-initiating cells via the interaction with a second molecule called SND1. The finding could suggest new treatment strategies.

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Neural sweet talk: Taste metaphors emotionally engage the brain

Researchers from Princeton University and the Free University of Berlin found that taste-related metaphors such as "sweet" actually engage the emotional centers of the brain more than literal words such as "kind" that have the same meaning. If metaphors in general elicit a similar emotional response, that could mean that figurative language presents a "rhetorical advantage" when communicating with others.

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Collaboration of minds and metal leads to possible shortcut to new drugs

Princeton University researchers merged two powerful areas of research to enable an unprecedented chemical reaction that neither could broadly achieve on its own. The resulting bond formation could provide an excellent shortcut for chemists as they construct and test thousands of molecules to find new drugs.

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Africa's poison 'apple' provides common ground for saving elephants, raising livestock

A five-year study led by Princeton University researchers suggests that certain wild African animals, particularly elephants, could be a boon to human-raised livestock because of their voracious appetite for the toxic and invasive plant Solanum campylacanthum, or the Sodom apple. Just as the governments of nations such as Kenya prepare to pour millions into eradicating the plant, the findings present a method for controlling the Sodom apple that is cost-effective for humans and beneficial for the survival of African elephants.

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Familiar yet strange: Water's 'split personality' revealed by computer model

Using computer models, Princeton University researchers found that as water freezes it takes on a sort of split personality wherein, at very cold temperatures and above a certain pressure, it may spontaneously split into two liquid forms. Finding this dual nature could lead to a better understanding of how water behaves in high-altitude clouds, which could improve the predictive ability of current weather and climate models.

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Riddick appointed executive director for human resources client services

Romy Riddick, director of diversity and inclusion in the Office of Human Resources since 2012, has been named executive director for client services in the Office of Human Resources at Princeton University. Riddick has served as acting executive director for client services since February.

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Prentice selected as dean of the faculty

Deborah Prentice, Princeton's Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Psychology, will become dean of the faculty on July 1.

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Princeton awards five honorary degrees

Princeton University awarded honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Tuesday, June 3, to five individuals for their contributions to human rights, public life, business, the humanities, education and engineering. Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber awarded degrees to Fazle Hasan Abed, founder and chair of the nongovernmental development organization BRAC; Madeleine K. Albright, former U.S. secretary of state; Herb Kelleher, co-founder of Southwest Airlines; James McPherson, the George Henry Davis 1886 Professor of History, Emeritus, at Princeton; and James West, an inventor and research professor of electrical and computer engineering at Johns Hopkins' Whiting School of Engineering.

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University Place detour and bus stop relocation to begin June 4

Starting on Wednesday, June 4, University Place will be closed to through traffic from College Road to Alexander Street due to construction of the Princeton University Arts and Transit Project. The TigerTransit and TigerPaWW (Princeton to Princeton Junction) bus stop will be relocated from University Place to College Road, across from the circle at the McCarter Theater Center.

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Fast and curious: Electrons hurtle into the interior of a new class of quantum materials

Scientists at Princeton University have made a step forward in developing a new class of materials that could be used in future technologies. They have discovered a new quantum effect that enables electrons — the negative-charge-carrying particles that make today's electronic devices possible — to dash through the interior of these materials with very little resistance.  

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Negative stereotypes can cancel each other out on résumés

Stereotypes of gay men as effeminate and weak and black men as threatening and aggressive can hurt members of those groups when white people evaluate them in employment, education, criminal justice and other contexts. But the negative attributes of the two stereotypes can cancel one another out for gay black men in the employment context, according to research by a Princeton University graduate student.

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Princeton University Press picks new distribution service

Princeton University Press has selected Perseus Academic, a division of Perseus Distribution Services, to provide book fulfillment and distribution services beginning in spring 2015. This new arrangement will facilitate more effective book distribution in order to keep up with changes in the business of print publishing and enable Princeton University Press to invest further in digital publishing operations.

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Victims want to change, not just punish, offenders

Revenge is a dish best served with a side of change. A series of experiments conducted by researchers affiliated with Princeton University has found that punishment is only satisfying to victims if the offenders change their attitude as a result of the punishment

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Paul Sigmund, scholar of political theory, Latin America, dies at 85

Paul Sigmund, a Princeton University scholar of political theory and Latin American politics, died at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro on Sunday, April 27. He was 85 and died from complications of pneumonia, his family said.

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Habermas to speak on 'Transnationalization of Democracy'

Jürgen Habermas, a world-renowned public intellectual, sociologist and philosopher, will speak on "Transnationalization of Democracy: A European Experiment," at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, May 1, in McCosh Hall, Room 50. The event, which is free and open to the public, is presented by the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society.

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Looking to future, educators and policymakers see universities as agents for change

Concluding a three-day conference in Paris, education leaders and policymakers from around the world on Friday shared a vision of the future in which universities anticipate, influence and drive change in global society. 

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'MOOC World': Experts clash over differing visions of education technology

University leaders and government officials from five continents on Thursday explored challenges and opportunities from economics to diversity that higher education faces. The second day of the Princeton-Fung Global Forum in Paris also featured vigorous debate on whether online learning platforms pose more risks or rewards for academia and society.

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Education, policy leaders gather in Paris for Princeton-Fung Global Forum

University leaders and policymakers from around the world gathered in Paris on Wednesday evening to begin a discussion on the future of higher education that will run over three days at the Princeton-Fung Global Forum. 

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Makela-Goodman named director of gift planning

Rochelle Makela-Goodman, a fundraising professional with 19 years of development experience, has joined the Princeton University Office of Development as director of gift planning.

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Huffington, Slaughter will discuss 'redefining success'

Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 7 p.m. · Richardson Auditorium

Arianna Huffington, chair, president and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, will discuss her latest book, "Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom and Wonder," at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22 in Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall, on the Princeton University campus. Tickets are needed for the event.

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Exhibit of Spectacular Latin American Medals at Princeton University Library

In celebration of the 200th anniversary of Latin America’s wars of independence, the Princeton University Library has mounted a dramatic display of medals and orders that illustrate the recognitions awarded to soldiers and civilians in the form of wearable insignia. The exhibit "From a Thankful Nation," which is free and open to the public, is on display in the main gallery of Firestone Library through August 3. A public exhibit lecture titled "Defining the Nation" by Miguel Centeno, professor of sociology and international affairs and chair of Princeton’s Department of Sociology, will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 13, in McCormick Hall, Room 101 on the Princeton University campus.

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Dust in the wind drove iron fertilization during ice age

Researchers from Princeton University and ETH Zurich have confirmed that during the last ice age iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive in a region of the Southern Ocean.

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Princeton's Oppenheimer, an author of upcoming UN climate-change report, available for comment

Princeton University professor Michael Oppenheimer will be available to comment on the upcoming release of the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which will examine the risks and consequences of climate change for humans and nature, and the ways to adapt to them. Oppenheimer is a coordinating lead author of the report, which is the second part of the Fifth Assessment Report from the IPCC, an organization under the auspices of the United Nations that periodically evaluates the effects of climate change.

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What singing fruit flies can tell us about quick decisions

Princeton University researchers have discovered that the pitch and tempo of the male fruit fly's mating song is based on environmental cues rather than a stereotyped pattern. These findings could be substantial for understanding rapid decision-making in more advanced beings such as humans.

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Former White House official Lu named Baccalaureate speaker; aerospace industry leader Augustine to speak at Hooding ceremony

Christopher P. Lu, former White House cabinet secretary and assistant to President Barack Obama and a member of Princeton's Class of 1988, has been selected as the speaker for the University's 2014 Baccalaureate ceremony. Norman Augustine, former chairman and chief executive officer of Lockheed Martin Corp. who holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University, will speak at the Hooding ceremony for advanced-degree candidates.

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Town and University working together on new parking system

The municipality of Princeton and Princeton University are working together on a project aimed at improving the parking system in town. The project will begin March 17 with the implementation of a parking procedure for metered, nonpermit spaces at the Princeton Station commuter lot. Parking spaces will be associated with a number, and drivers will pay at consolidated pay stations.

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Tracking genes on the path to genetic treatment

Princeton University and University of Michigan researchers have developed a system that allows computers to "virtually dissect" a kidney in a way that surgery cannot. The machine uses data from an array of gene-activity measurements in patients' kidney biopsies to mathematically separate cells and identify genes that are turned on in a specific cell type.

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In the eye of a chicken, a new state of matter comes into view

Along with eggs, soup and rubber toys, the list of the chicken's most lasting legacies may eventually include advanced materials, according to researchers from Princeton University and Washington University in St. Louis. The researchers report that the unusual arrangement of cells in a chicken's eye constitutes the first known biological occurrence of a potentially new state of matter known as "disordered hyperuniformity," which has been shown to have unique physical properties.

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University provides second dose of meningitis B vaccine

Princeton University began providing a second dose of the meningitis B vaccine to recommended campus groups on Monday, Feb. 17, with 3,215 individuals vaccinated by the end of the third day. Another 305 individuals received the second dose last month. The vaccine clinics are being held from noon to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Feb. 17-20, in the Frist Campus Center multipurpose room. More information about the clinics is available on the University's meningitis website.

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RSVP by Feb. 19 for coverage of Sonia Sotomayor and Hunter R. Rawlings III at Princeton University

This advisory is to alert members of the news media that Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and Hunter R. Rawlings III, President of the Association of American Universities, will speak during Princeton University’s annual Alumni Day on Saturday, Feb. 22.

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Al Gore selected as 2014 Class Day speaker

Former Vice President Al Gore has been selected to deliver the keynote address at the University's Class Day ceremony on Monday, June 2. Class Day, which takes place the day before Princeton's Commencement, is an opportunity for seniors to publicly acknowledge achievements and contributions of members of the graduating class and University community

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Eisgruber outlines strategic planning process for University

Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber announced at the Feb. 10 meeting of the Council of the Princeton University Community (CPUC) that the University has begun a strategic planning process.

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Trustees approve 8.5 percent increase in financial aid budget

Princeton University trustees Jan. 25 approved an 8.5 percent increase in undergraduate financial aid to $131.6 million in adopting the University’s operating budget for 2014-15. The University’s pioneering financial aid program is committed to providing access and affordability to students from all economic backgrounds without a required loan.

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Kulkarni named dean of Graduate School

Sanjeev Kulkarni, professor of electrical engineering and director of the Keller Center, has been appointed as the next dean of the Princeton University Graduate School, effective March 31.

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Princeton applications remain near record-high

Princeton University has received 26,607 applications for admission to the Class of 2018. The applicants include 3,854 candidates who applied last fall through single-choice early action.   The University's undergraduate admission office offered ad

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UPDATED: Alexander Street and University Place intersection to reopen on Monday, Feb. 3

On Monday, Feb. 3, construction crews will reopen the intersection of Alexander Street and University Place to vehicular traffic.

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UPDATE JAN. 17: Eisgruber attends White House event on college opportunity

Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber was in Washington, D.C., Thursday, attending a White House event on increasing college opportunity for low-income and disadvantaged students. The summit of education leaders included remarks from President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.

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Fred Hargadon, former dean of admission, dies

Fred Hargadon, who admitted a generation of students to Princeton University as dean of admission from 1988 to 2003, died at his home in Princeton on Wednesday night. He was 80.

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University to celebrate King's legacy; Wasow to give keynote

Monday, Jan. 20, 2014, 1 p.m. · Alexander Hall, Richardson Auditorium

Princeton University will commemorate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with its annual King Day celebration on Monday, Jan. 20, in Richardson Auditorium of Alexander Hall. Doors open at 1 p.m. Omar Wasow, an assistant professor of politics, will give the keynote address.

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Tiny acts of microbe justice help reveal how nature fights freeloaders

Princeton University researchers have discovered that bacteria prevent layabouts from enjoying the fruit of others' hard work by keeping food generated by the community's productive members away from those microbes that attempt to live on others' leftovers. The process could have uses in agriculture, energy and medicine, as well as provide insight into how species protect themselves from the freeloaders of their kind.

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Opposing phenomena possible key to high-efficiency electricity delivery

Princeton University-led researchers report that the coexistence of two opposing phenomena might be the secret to understanding how materials known as high-temperature superconductors — heralded as the future of powering our homes and communities — actually work. Such insight could help spur the further development of high-efficiency electric-power delivery.

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Leading thinkers to discuss future of higher education at Princeton forum in Paris

Some of the world's top thinkers including Nobel laureates, policymakers and university leaders will gather in Paris in April to discuss the future of higher education at the second annual Princeton-Fung Global Forum.

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UPDATE Dec. 12: More than 5,200 receive meningitis B vaccines

Princeton University has provided the first dose of the meningitis B vaccine to 5,268 individuals, which represent 91 percent of the approximately 5,800 University community members who were eligible to receive the vaccine. Vaccinations were given during clinics in Frist Campus Center from Monday through Thursday, Dec. 9-12.

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University provides meningitis B vaccine during campus clinics

Princeton University began providing the first dose of the meningitis B vaccine to recommended campus groups on Monday, Dec. 9, with 1,959 individuals vaccinated by the end of the first day. At the conclusion of the clinics on Thursday night, the total number vaccinated was 5,268. The vaccine clinics are being held from noon to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Dec. 9-12, in the Frist Campus Center multipurpose room. More information about the clinics is available on the University's meningitis website.

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University will offer Meningitis B vaccines to recommended groups

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has now officially recommended that all Princeton University undergraduate students, and also graduate students living in undergraduate dormitories, the Graduate College and annexes, and other members of the University community with certain medical conditions, receive a vaccine that helps protect against meningococcal disease caused by serogroup B bacteria. The vaccine will be provided only to these groups, and it will not be administered anywhere else.

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Even if emissions stop, carbon dioxide could warm Earth for centuries

Princeton University-led research suggests that even if carbon-dioxide emissions came to a sudden halt, the carbon dioxide already in Earth's atmosphere could continue to warm our planet for hundreds of years. Thus, it might take a lot less carbon than previously thought to reach the global temperature scientists deem unsafe.

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Meningitis B vaccine being considered at Princeton

At the request of the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviewed the seven cases of meningococcal disease contracted by Princeton University students and a student visitor since March 2013, all of which were caused by meningococcal bacteria known as serogroup B, including the latest case reported on Nov. 10.

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Williams named Princeton's executive vice president

Treby Williams, who has helped lead efforts at Princeton University to enhance campus life, modernize operations, strengthen safety planning and coordination, and augment campus services, has been named Princeton's executive vice president. Her appointment is effective Nov. 18.

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Sanghvi selected as Princeton's executive director of Career Services

Pulin Sanghvi, who led the Career Management Center at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, has been named executive director of Career Services at Princeton University, effective Dec. 1. The new position is intended to help broaden career exploration and opportunities for all students, and establish new relationships with employers and organizations representing a wide range of interests and fields.

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'Tiger stripes' underneath Antarctic glaciers slow the flow

Narrow stripes of dirt and rock beneath massive Antarctic glaciers create friction zones that slow the flow of ice toward the sea, researchers at Princeton University and the British Antarctic Survey have found. Understanding how these high-friction regions form and subside could help researchers understand how the flow of these glaciers responds to a warming climate.

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If a tree falls in Brazil…? Amazon deforestation could mean droughts for western U.S.

Princeton University-led researchers report that the total deforestation of the Amazon could mean 20 percent less rain for the coastal Northwest and a 50 percent reduction in the Sierra Nevada snowpack, resulting in water and food shortages, and a greater risk of forest fires. The research is intended to highlight how the destruction of the Amazon rainforest could affect climate elsewhere.

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Yosvany Terry Quintet to perform in Princeton

The Yosvany Terry Quartet will perform at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14, in the Solley Theater, Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street in Princeton. The performance — which takes place in conjunction with the Princeton University course "Cultures of the Afro-Diaspora," taught by Alexandra Vazquez, assistant professor of English and African American studies — is free and open to the public.

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Sotomayor, Rawlings to receive top alumni awards

Princeton University will present its top honors for alumni to Sonia Sotomayor, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and Hunter R. Rawlings III, president of the Association of American Universities and a former president of two universities.

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Veterans Day observance to be held in chapel

Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, 8:30 a.m. · Princeton University Chapel

A Veterans Day observance is planned for 8:30 to 9 a.m., Monday, Nov. 11, in the Princeton University Chapel. Lt. Col. Peter Knight, who is in his third year as the director of Princeton's Army Officer Education Program, will deliver remarks. The program also will include an invocation, benediction, presentation of colors, and music, including the singing of the "Star-Spangled Banner" and "America the Beautiful," a viola solo and taps.

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Employee Resource Groups foster community at Princeton

From community service projects and discussion groups to potluck dinners and bowling nights, Princeton University's Employee Resource Groups (ERG) provide opportunities for employees with shared backgrounds and interests to build communities across campus.

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Light and integrated spaces join neuroscience and psychology buildings

Construction is nearly complete on the two linked buildings for the Princeton Neuroscience Institute (PNI) and Peretsman-Scully Hall, the new home of the psychology department, with move-in to be completed in January. Designed by architect José Rafael Moneo of Madrid in collaboration with Davis Brody Bond of New York City, the 248,000-square-foot complex includes classrooms, laboratories, office space and common areas.

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Without plants, Earth would cook under billions of tons of additional carbon

Researchers based at Princeton University found that Earth's terrestrial ecosystems have absorbed 186 billion to 192 billion tons of carbon since the mid-20th century, which has significantly contained the global temperature and levels of carbon in the atmosphere.

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Small bits of genetic material fight cancer's spread

Researchers at Princeton University have found that microRNAs — small bits of genetic material capable of repressing the expression of certain genes — may serve as both therapeutic targets and predictors of metastasis, or a cancer’s spread from its initial site to other parts of the body.

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New transit schedules, Alexander Street-University Place detour to go into effect

The week of Oct. 13, NJ TRANSIT and TigerPaww shuttle schedules will change. Additionally, a detour will begin Oct. 16 around the Alexander Street-University Place intersection as a roundabout is constructed.

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Riotta named first Pirelli Visiting Professor

Gianni Riotta, an eminent Italian journalist and writer, will serve as the first Pirelli Visiting Professor in Italian Studies in the Department of French and Italian during Spring 2014.  

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How red crabs on Christmas Island speak for the tropics

Research conducted through Princeton University found that erratic rainfall — which could become more irregular as a result of climate change — could be detrimental to animals that migrate with the dry-wet seasonal cycle. The researchers studied the annual mating migration of the land-dwelling Christmas Island red crab in order to help scientists understand the consequences of climate change for the millions of migratory animals in Earth's tropical zones.

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Weighed down by guilt: Research shows it's more than a metaphor

Ever feel the weight of guilt? Princeton researcher Martin Day and Ramona Bobocel, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Waterloo, recently published the results of a series of studies that begin to offer answers to that question.

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Loh named Princeton University fire marshal

Scott W. Loh, a 22-year veteran in fire service has been appointed fire marshal in Princeton University's Department of Public Safety effective Oct. 21. "We are very excited to have Scott join the department,” said Paul L. Ominsky, executive director of Public Safety.

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Faculty committee will review assessment and grading policies

Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber has charged a new faculty committee with reviewing the University's policies for how student work is evaluated. The Ad Hoc Committee to Review Policies Regarding Assessment and Grading will explore whether the University's assessment guidelines remain effective and appropriate.

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Dietrich bequest endows economic theory center and supports financial aid at Princeton

A substantial bequest from industrialist and philanthropist William S. Dietrich II, a member of Princeton University's Class of 1960, will endow the University's Economic Theory Center, which has been renamed in his honor. His gift will also support undergraduate and graduate student financial aid by establishing a fund for the William S. Dietrich II Scholars and Fellows.

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Media Advisory: Princeton's Oppenheimer available to comment on release of first part of IPCC Fifth Assessment Report

Princeton University professor Michael Oppenheimer is available to comment on the Sept. 27 release of the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to examine the connection between greenhouse gases and human-made climate change and its consequences, such as extreme heat, intense precipitation and sea-level rise. Titled "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis," it is the first part of the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report.

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Tropical forest carbon absorption may hinge on an odd couple

A Princeton University-based study found that a unique housing arrangement between trees in the legume family and the carbo-loading rhizobia bacteria may determine how well tropical forests can absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The findings suggest that the role of tropical forests in offsetting the atmospheric buildup of carbon from fossil fuels depends on tree diversity.

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Earth's wobble 'fixes' dinner for marine organisms

The cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of a nutrient essential to the health of the ocean, according to a new study in the journal Nature. The discovery of factors that control this nutrient, known as "fixed" nitrogen, gives researchers insight into how the ocean regulates its own life-support system, which in turn affects the Earth's climate and the size of marine fisheries. 

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Movement of marine life follows speed and direction of climate change

New research based at Princeton University shows that the trick to predicting when and where sea animals will relocate due to climate change is to follow the pace and direction of temperature changes, known as climate velocity.

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Eisgruber, Trustees approve comprehensive strategy to increase diversity

The Board of Trustees and President Christopher L. Eisgruber have unanimously endorsed a report by a special trustee committee that recommends a comprehensive strategy to increase the diversity and inclusivity of the Princeton University community, with a particular focus on graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, faculty and senior administrators. The proposed strategy builds on Princeton's significant advances over more than five decades while focusing on areas where more could be accomplished.

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PIIRS interdisciplinary research community to explore global systemic risk

An interdisciplinary group of Princeton University scholars working to understand better the nature of risk has been selected by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) as its 2014-16 research community.

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Poor concentration: Poverty reduces brainpower needed for navigating other areas of life

Research based at Princeton University found that poverty and all its related concerns require so much mental energy that the poor have less remaining brainpower to devote to other areas of life.

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Arts and Transit Project enters new phase with temporary station

Construction on Princeton University's Arts and Transit Project enters a new phase this week as NJ TRANSIT opens a temporary Princeton Station and the University opens a new meter and parking lot.

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Stunning images of Andromeda demonstrate the world's most powerful astronomical camera

Stunning images of the Andromeda Galaxy are among the first to emerge from a new wide-field camera installed on the enormous Subaru Telescope called the Hyper-Suprime Cam (HSC), which is the result of an international collaboration between Princeton University astrophysicists and Japanese and Taiwanese scientists.

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Great Recession onset spurs harsh parenting, researchers find

The onset of the Great Recession and, more generally, deteriorating economic conditions lead mothers to engage in harsh parenting, such as hitting or shouting at children, a team of researchers has found. But the effect is only found in mothers who carry a gene variation that makes them more likely to react to their environment.

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Alexander Street detour extended to Aug. 19

Alexander Street will remain closed to through traffic from College Road to University Place through Sunday, Aug. 18; it will re-open on Monday, Aug. 19.

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Cool heads likely won't prevail in a hotter, wetter world

Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-Berkeley report that even slight spikes in temperature and precipitation greatly increase the risk of personal and civil violence, and suggest that more human conflict is a likely outcome of climate change.

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Evolution picks up hitchhikers

In a twist on "survival of the fittest," Princeton University researchers have discovered that evolution is driven not by a single beneficial mutation but rather by a group of mutations, including ones called "genetic hitchhikers" that are simply along for the ride.

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Rubby Sherr, tireless Princeton professor and an architect of the Atomic Age, dies at 99

Princeton University nuclear physicist Rubby Sherr, whose work on the Manhattan Project helped usher in the Atomic Age and whose academic publications span nearly 80 years, died July 8 of natural causes at the Quadrangle independent-living community in Haverford, Pa. He was 99.

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Princeton's Annual Giving campaign raises $57 million

Princeton University's 2012-13 Annual Giving campaign raised $57,019,138 — the second-highest total in Annual Giving history — with 61.1 percent of undergraduate alumni participating. The results are notable for their strength and breadth across all of Princeton's constituencies: undergraduate alumni, graduate alumni, parents and friends.

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Exercise reorganizes the brain to be more resilient to stress

A research team based at Princeton University found that physical activity reorganizes the brain so that its response to stress is reduced and anxiety is less likely to interfere with normal brain function.

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Altitude sickness may hinder ethnic integration in the world's highest places

Princeton University research suggests that ethnic segregation — and potential ethnic tension — in nations straddling the world's steepest terrains may be reinforced by the biological tolerance different peoples have to altitude, according to one of the first studies to examine the effect of elevation on ethnic demographics

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University selects U-NOW as child care provider for future on-campus center

Princeton University has selected U-NOW Day Nursery to provide child care for a new full-day, on-campus child care center that is anticipated to open in about four years. The new center will serve around 150 to 180 children from infants to age 5 and will be available to children of University faculty, staff and graduate students.

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Is there an invisible tug-of-war behind bad hearts and power outages?

Researchers from Princeton University and Germany's Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization report the first purely physical experimental evidence that an invisible and chaotic tug-of-war known as a chimera state could occur naturally within any process that relies on spontaneous synchronization, including clock pendulums, power grids and heart valves.

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Weekend substitute bus service to run between Princeton and Princeton Junction

On the weekends of June 15-16 and June 22-23, buses will replace the rail shuttle service between Princeton and Princeton Junction Station due to construction of the new Princeton Station.

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Princeton University holds 266th Commencement

Princeton University awarded degrees to 1,261 undergraduates in the Class of 2013, five from other classes and 892 graduate students at its 266th Commencement Tuesday, June 4.

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Four faculty members recognized for outstanding teaching

Four Princeton University faculty members received President's Awards for Distinguished Teaching at Commencement ceremonies Tuesday, June 4. They are: Yelena Baraz, assistant professor of classics; Andrew Houck, associate professor of electrical engineering; Deborah Nord, professor of English; and David Spergel, the Charles A. Young Professor of Astronomy on the Class of 1897 Foundation and professor of astrophysical sciences.  

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Princeton awards six honorary degrees

Princeton University awarded honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Tuesday, June 4, to six individuals for their contributions to architecture, education, literature, the humanities, human rights, medicine and science: Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health; Lorraine Daston, executive director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin; Frank Gehry, world-renowned architect; Toni Morrison, Nobel laureate and the Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities Emeritus at Princeton; Shirley M. Tilghman, president of Princeton University; and Sakena Yacoobi, executive director of the Afghan Institute of Learning.

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Graduate School admits 1,208 from competitive applicant pool

Princeton University's Graduate School admitted 1,208 of the 11,179 students who applied for the 2013-14 academic year, with the school's international reputation and generous financial aid program attracting students from across the globe.

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Alumnus Donoho receives Shaw Prize in mathematics

Princeton University alumnus David Donoho, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Humanities and Sciences and a professor of statistics at Stanford University, today was named the 2013 Shaw Laureate in mathematics. A member of Princeton's Class of 1978, Donoho was recognized for his work to get a more detailed analysis out of large numerical data sets.

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Princeton to honor four secondary school teachers

Princeton University will honor four exceptional New Jersey secondary school teachers at its 2013 Commencement on Tuesday, June 4.

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Sagar sees Constitution at work in AP phone records seizure

The Justice Department's controversial seizure of Associated Press phone records highlights a messy but effective constitutional balancing act that ultimately benefits the country, said Rahul Sagar, an assistant professor of politics at Princeton University.

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'The Great Gatsby' manuscript and galleys now online through Princeton University Digital Library

The Princeton University Library is pleased to announce the digitization of the autograph manuscript and corrected galleys of F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1925), which were donated to the Princeton University Library in 1950 by Fitzgerald's daughter Scottie Fitzgerald Lanahan. The Library has put the digital images online in the Princeton University Digital Library (PUDL), making the historical items easily accessible to researchers, Fitzgerald fans and the general public.

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Alexander Street detour to begin June 6

Starting on Thursday, June 6, Alexander Street will be closed to thru traffic from College Road to University Place. This closure is expected to remain in place until the end of July.

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Princeton University Commencement to be held June 4

Members of the news media who wish to attend any of Princeton University's 2013 graduation ceremonies Sunday through Tuesday, June 2-4, must contact the University's Office of Communications no later than 3 p.m. Friday, May 24, to request credentials.

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Media Advisory: Lost in space — Cancellation of NASA's Kepler mission would hinder exploration of extrasolar planets, Princeton's Bakos says

The potential cancellation of the NASA Kepler satellite mission would mark the end of an unparalleled source of information about planets and planetary systems outside of Earth's solar system, known as exoplanets, according to Princeton University astrophysicist Gáspár Bakos, who studies exoplanets and has discovered more than 40.

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University Public Safety, Princeton Police update operating procedures

The Princeton University Department of Public Safety and the Princeton Police Department have updated an agreement on operating procedures that also outlines best practices and processes for enhancing collaboration between the departments to best serve the entire Princeton community.

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Temporary traffic signal installation begins May 13

A temporary traffic signal is being installed at the intersection of College Road and University Place for use over the next year when construction detours are in effect for Princeton University's Arts and Transit Project.

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Nine students receive 2013 Spirit of Princeton Award

Nine students have been named winners of the 2013 Spirit of Princeton Award, which honors undergraduates at Princeton University for their positive contributions to campus life. The award recognizes students who have demonstrated a strong commitment to the undergraduate experience through dedicated efforts with student organizations, athletics, community service, religious life, residential life and the arts.

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New analysis suggests wind, not water, formed mound on Mars

Researchers based at Princeton University, the California Institute of Technology and Ashima Research suggest that Mars' roughly 3.5-mile high Mount Sharp most likely emerged as strong winds carried dust and sand into Gale Crater where the mound sits. If correct, the research could dilute expectations that the mound is the remnant of a massive lake, which would have important implications for understanding Mars' past habitability.

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