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Spring 2014 – Pedagogy and Professional Workshops

PEDAGOGY

The Scholar as Teacher

In this series, faculty members distinguished for their teaching offer reflections on their own development and practice as teachers. All programs meet over lunch from 12:15-1:30 in 330 Frist.
Speakers/Dates TBA

   

The McGraw Master Class on Lecturing

Our popular master class focuses on lecture design and presentation. In this 5-part series, participants discuss, design and practice course lectures in sessions framed by research on student learning and guidance from McGraw Center directors. In the first meeting, participants consider research on student attention and learning in lectures and brainstorm possibilities for increasing student engagement in class lectures. Then, in the 3 subsequent weeks, participants design and present their own plans for a course lecture and deliver a 10-minute portion of them for practice and feedback from the group. In the final session, a panel of several Princeton faculty members discusses their approaches to the craft of lecturing and responds to participants’ questions. This workshop is limited to 12 participants who commit to attend all sessions and present a lecture plan and mini-lecture.
Mondays, February 10, 24; March 3, 10, 24, 3:00-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

We Teach Students, Not Subjects: Strategies for an Interactive Classroom

Research confirms an attention span of 10 to 15 minutes is typical for most students listening to a lecture before they begin to zone out. So what else can you do? This workshop is will help you design and implement in-class activities that go beyond the traditional lecture. We will consider how to use active learning tactics to change dynamic of a class and/or vary the pace of a semester, and how to use activities to assess students’ learning. Participants will be introduced to a variety of classroom activities that can be used across multiple disciplines and within a variety of course formats.
Thursday February 6, 3:30-5:00pm in 330 Frist

   

Troubleshooting Your Precept – Leading Discussions, Solving Problems

Tired of doing homework problems on the board? Can't get your students to talk on topic? Come share your experiences with fellow preceptors and a panel of experienced Graduate Teaching Fellows from the McGraw Center. We will discuss strategies that you can use in your classroom to address your specific concerns. These workshops are directed at both new graduate Assistants in Instruction and experienced AI's who want to invigorate their classrooms with new teaching strategies. Lunch is provided.

Problem-Solving and Example-Based Precepts
Wednesday, February 19, 12:00-1:20 p.m. in 330 Frist

Discussion-Based Precepts –
Thursday, February 20, 12:00-1:20 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Understanding How Students Learn

One aspect of effective teaching is understanding and addressing your students' difficulties with the new content and skills of your course. In this workshop, we will discuss some of the neuroscience and psychology behind students’ struggles integrating learned topics with prior knowledge and applying them to new situations. Based on this exploration, we will brainstorm concrete strategies for classroom management and activities, from knowing when to pause to what examples will be best to discuss. Participants will be able to apply the ideas introduced in this workshop immediately in their precepts as well as in their future course plans and development.
Thursday, February 27, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

How’s It Going?: Soliciting and Interpreting Feedback on Your Teaching

At the midpoint in the semester, how is your class going? This workshop will lay out an array of strategies for finding answers to this crucial question. We will provide some guidelines and techniques for soliciting direct, honest, and useful student feedback in time to make positive changes in your class, and consider how you might build opportunities for reflecting on how things are going into your course design going forward.
Thursday, March 6, 3:30-5:00p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Designing a Course

Are you preparing a new syllabus for a new teaching position or job search? This workshop examines course design and syllabus preparation from the perspective of student learning, using a variety of models from across the disciplines. Workshop activities guide you in defining your goals for your students and then using them to shape all aspects of a well-integrated course, from your class format to student assignments, exams, and the syllabus.
Tuesday, March 11, 3:30-5:00p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Gender, Race, and Authority in the Classroom

In this workshop, we’ll talk about how gender and race (of teachers and students) can impact teaching in ways both positive and negative. We’ll consider how the dynamics of gender and race can impact the classroom as well as how these dynamics affect expectations outside the classroom, such as in office hours, as a mentor, around setting expectations about availability, and so on. We’ll also work on practical tips and strategies for addressing issues that arise around race and gender dynamics to work toward an effective inclusive classroom for all. 
Wednesday, March 12, 3:30-5:00p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Making the Most of One-on-One Teaching

Office hours, the five minutes before or after class, an email exchange….these one-on-one moments can be very significant opportunities to clarify, reinforce, and deepen student learning, as well as to learn more about how your students are doing (both in the class and beyond). However, these one-on-one conversations can also be challenging, as when you are caught off guard, or frustrating, when the questions feel entitled or students don’t show up even though they should. We’ll use this workshop to strategize about how to make the most of these one-on-one teaching opportunities and find solutions to the challenges posed by one-on-one instruction.
Thursday, March 27, 3:30-5:00p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Having a Life While Teaching: Efficient Teaching Strategies for Finding Balance Across Your Career

Have you put everything else in life on hold this semester while you’re teaching? Are you now completely stressed out because you haven’t been writing for the last few weeks (or months)? While it can be tempting to foreground the immediate work of teaching in place of everything else, that strategy is not sustainable in the short or long term of an academic career. So how do people effectively balance their academic goals and teaching responsibilities? What methods could you adopt to make your teaching more efficient but no less effective? In this workshop we’ll discuss approaches to teaching that maintain high standards for student learning while also allowing you to take retake control of your time.
Thursday April 3, 3:30-5:00p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Preparing To Write a Meaningful Statement of Teaching Philosophy

Teaching statements have become important in academic job searches as more and more colleges and universities are requesting them from applicants for faculty positions. This workshop will introduce participants to the concept of the teaching statement and present recent research on how search committees interpret them. We will also discuss how writing a statement can serve as a valuable means of enhancing one’s own teaching strategies. This workshop will provide a context for participants to start writing their own statements by drafting key elements of them that draw on their teaching experiences and their goals for their students.
Wednesday, April 9, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Applying the Science and Research on Learning to Lecturing: A Workshop for Postdoctoral Scholars

In this workshop we will discuss issues that lecturers face by considering research on student learning, with an emphasis on student attention and memory retention in lectures. In light of what we know about how students learn in lectures, the workshop will enable participants to reflect on their goals for giving lectures in their disciplinary courses and they will begin to design new strategies for engaging students and making lectures a more effective context for learning.
Thursday, April 17, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Teaching Statement Clinic

This clinic led by McGraw Center Fellows is for people currently in the process of drafting their statements of teaching philosophy, either for a job search or for completion of the McGraw Center’s Teaching Transcript program. During this clinic, participants will receive general guidance on improving their statements as well as feedback on their own current drafts from the clinic leaders and peers. Participants must bring a working draft. This clinic does not count toward the Teaching Transcript.
Thursday, April 24, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 303 Frist

   

Mentoring Undergraduate Researchers

In this workshop you’ll learn techniques--based on American Physics Society guidelines--for clarifying mentor and mentee roles and responsibilities and establishing clear expectations. These practical approaches can prevent frustration, over-dependence, and a lack of productivity which can make working with a mentee unsatisfying. Take away a useful framework for working with your particular mentee over the coming summer.
TBA

   


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROF 101: Entering the Professoriate

This is a seminar for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows who will begin new faculty appointments in Fall 2014 that provides an introduction to professional skills and information that new faculty members need. Guest speakers, readings and activities address topics that include: getting off to a good start in the promotion and tenure process, managing the demands of teaching and research, lecturing, understanding how students learn, and course design. Participants are expected to attend all sessions.
Mondays, May 5, 12, and 19, 3:00-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Make the Most of Your Summer Research and Writing

The dissertation is a product not only of disciplinary research and writing, it entails work practices that scholars will bring into their academic careers. In this workshop, we discuss issues in the dissertation writing process: the challenges of unstructured time, achieving focus and intellectual creativity, and organizing effective peer writing groups that produce useful feedback. Participants will reflect on their own work patterns and use empirical research on productive practices among academics in order to identify and establish effective habits that they can draw on to have a successful academic summer that will positively shape their careers as scholars and faculty.
Thursday, June 5, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   


 

   
   
   

Fall 2013 – Pedagogy Workshops for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows

   

The Scholar as Teacher

In this lunchtime series, faculty members distinguished for their teaching offer reflections on their own development and practice as instructors. All programs include lunch and meet from 12:15-1:30 in 330 Frist. Fall speakers TBA (see our website for schedule).
   

Making the Most of the Teaching Transcript Program at McGraw

The Teaching Transcript Program guides you in enhancing your teaching skills and provides documentation of your formal pedagogical training for the academic job search. In this lunchtime meeting, participants plan strategies for effectively reflecting on their teaching throughout the semester. We discuss components of our program such as the class observation as well as how to draw on that and our workshops to prepare an effective statement of teaching philosophy and syllabus, which are the written work for the Transcript. Lunch is provided.
Wednesday, September 18, 12:15-1:20 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Preparing to Write a Meaningful Statement of Teaching Philosophy

As colleges and universities are increasingly requesting teaching statements from applicants for new faculty positions, this workshop introduces participants to the idea of the teaching statement and the qualities that search committees value most when reading them. Activities in this session will enable participants to take the first key steps toward drafting their own statements by reflecting on their teaching experiences. Follow-up this workshop at one of our teaching statement clinics in which you can get feedback on a draft of your statement.
Wednesday, September 25, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist
Thursday, October 10, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Teaching Statement Clinic

This clinic led by McGraw Center Fellows is for people currently in the process of drafting their statements of teaching philosophy, either for a job search or for completion of the McGraw Center’s Teaching Transcript program. During this clinic, participants will receive general guidance on improving their statements as well as feedback on their own current drafts from the clinic leaders and peers. Participants must bring a working draft.This clinic does not count toward the Teaching Transcript.
Monday October 14, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist 

   

Grading as a Teaching Tool

This workshop addresses important concerns and challenges of grading for AIs, such as criteria, fairness, written feedback, and grading student participation. Participants in the workshop will define the criteria for their students’ work and begin to formulate rubrics that can usefully address these concerns as well as meaningfully assess and advance their students’ learning. Further, we consider how we might shift our students’ focus on getting good grades to reflecting on their own learning.
Thursday, October 17, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Lab Teaching Roundtable for AIs

This roundtable discussion will focus on teaching in a laboratory setting. A panel of experienced AIs from biology, chemistry, and engineering will field questions from the participants and lead a discussion on how the lab AI facilitates student learning. Participants are invited to share their experiences teaching lab, identify unanticipated challenges they have encountered during the beginning of the semester, and discuss how they have adapted the skills they obtained during AI orientation to the lab. Lunch will be provided. 
Tuesday, October 22, 12:15-1:20 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Mentoring Undergraduate Researchers

In this workshop you’ll learn techniques--based on American Physics Society guidelines--for clarifying mentor and mentee roles and responsibilities and establishing clear expectations. These practical approaches can prevent frustration, over-dependence, and a lack of productivity which can make working with a mentee unsatisfying. Take away a useful framework for working with your particular mentee. Lunch will be provided.
Tuesday, November 5, 12:15-1:30 p.m. in 330 Frist 
RSVP

   

Designing a Course

Are you preparing a new syllabus for a new teaching position or job search? This workshop examines course design and syllabus preparation from the perspective of student learning, using a variety of models from across the disciplines. Workshop activities guide you in defining your goals for your students and then using them to shape all aspects of a well-integrated course, from your class format to student assignments, exams, and the syllabus.
Thursday, November 14, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist 

   

Talking About Teaching in an Academic Interview

While graduate students and post-doctoral fellows receive ample opportunity to present their doctoral research in forums such as departmental colloquia or national conferences, they rarely talk about teaching and pedagogy in such public settings. As a result, they may lack the preparation for speaking about their teaching in compelling terms when it may count the most: the job interview. This workshop gives participants the chance to begin--or refine--that preparation as they anticipate a campus visit. Co-sponsored with the Office of Career Services.
Wednesday, December 11, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Preparing Your Teaching Demonstration for a Campus Interview

A campus visit invitation from a search committee is terrific news, but it often comes with the challenging request for a “teaching demo.” In this workshop, we’ll talk about what questions you should ask and how you can use the answers from a particular hiring institution to craft an effective demonstration of your teaching prowess. During the workshop you’ll begin the process of planning an engaging lesson to highlight the strengths of your teaching for hiring committees and beyond.
Thursday, January 23, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Teaching with Films: Text and Tech. in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Whether as documentaries or mass media, films can engage students and enliven class discussions. Yet if film and televisual media are typically used to support and illustrate disciplinary ideas and facts, how can we elevate these media as primary texts and teach students to engage them in their own terms? Specifically, how can we teach our students to use disciplinary concepts to interpret the material and semantic heterogeneity of films and how can students express rich understandings? Participants take part in sample activities that they can take to their classes, such as using digital video editing to “deconstruct” films while connecting disciplinary ideas with film narratives and forms. 
Time and Place TBA

   
 
   

Teaching with Films: Text and Tech. in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Whether as documentaries or mass media, films can engage students and enliven class discussions. Yet if film and televisual media are typically used to support and illustrate disciplinary ideas and facts, how can we elevate these media as primary texts and teach students to engage them in their own terms? Specifically, how can we teach our students to use disciplinary concepts to interpret the material and semantic heterogeneity of films and how can students express rich understandings? Participants take part in sample activities that they can take to their classes, such as using digital video editing to “deconstruct” films while connecting disciplinary ideas with film narratives and forms.
Thursday, January 24, 3:00-5:00 p.m. in 330 Frist

   

Register Now--Seating is Limited


RSVPMaking the Most of One-on-One Teaching 3/27/14 

   

RSVPHaving a Life While Teaching: Efficient Teaching Strategies for Finding Balance Across Your Career, 4/3/14

   

RSVPPreparing to Write a Meaningful Statement of Teaching Philosophy 4/9/14

   

RSVPApplying the Science and Research on Learning to Lecturing: A Workshop for Postdoctoral Scholars 4/17/14

   

RSVP: Teaching Statement Clinic, 4/24/12