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Campus Resources for Research


As one of the world’s top ten research universities and with a student to faculty ratio of 6:1, Princeton offers undergraduate students unique mentorship opportunities from leading scholars across academic divisions, as well as access to world-class research facilities and resources.
Whether you are interested in basic or applied scientific research, or curious about scholarship in the humanities, social sciences or the creative arts, you will find that Princeton offers and supports many opportunities to explore your scholarly interests beyond the classroom walls and as early as the summer of freshman year. 
At Princeton, all undergraduates are required to complete independent work in their chosen field. Students are encouraged to discuss their research interests with faculty advisers, departmental representatives, deans and directors of studies in the residential colleges, and the director of undergraduate research in the Office of the Dean of the College. 

Students seeking financial support for senior thesis research, research related to junior independent work, presentations at discipline-specific conferences, unpaid internships and special projects can identify funding opportunities and submit applications through the Student Activities Funding Engine (SAFE). 

   

Ask A Librarian

Reference librarians are available to work with undergraduates on research projects in any subject. They can help students make a research plan, find sources (electronic and print), and provide guidance through the research process. There are many ways to ask a librarian:


Visit the Reference Desk in Firestone Library or any branch library;
Chat Live with a Librarian through instant messaging;
E-mail a Question to the Library’s online reference service;
Schedule a Research Appointment with a librarian;
Contact a Subject Specialist by e-mail or telephone.

   

Senior Thesis Resources

Senior Thesis Writing Groups offer workshops and intensive writing sessions for seniors in participating departments. They help seniors learn the methods and expectations of research and writing in their concentration, provide practical guidance for tackling big research projects, and establish communities of writers for support and feedback. Many Thesis Groups also sponsor occasional Boot Camps, which give seniors a quiet space to write, focused time for reading and thinking, the camaraderie of fellow writers, and the opportunity to reflect on the writing process. For more information, contact the graduate student group leader in your department.

For consultations on your thesis, you may sign up for 80-minute appointments with a graduate Writing Center Fellow in your field or neighboring discipline. Fellows serve as sounding boards, careful readers, and helpful critics, and they welcome writers at any stage in the process, from getting started on a topic to refining an argument. In other words, no writing is required for a productive conference since Fellows are trained to conduct brainstorming sessions as well as to offer feedback on drafts. Writing Center conferences complement, but do not replace, your work with your adviser. Visit www.princeton.edu/writing/appt to choose either a specific Fellow to meet with, or to find the first available conference.
 

   

JP Resources

For consultations on your JP, you may sign up for 80-minute appointments with a graduate Writing Center Fellow in your field or neighboring discipline. Fellows serve as sounding boards, careful readers, and helpful critics, and they welcome writers at any stage in the process, from getting started on a topic to refining an argument. In other words, no writing is required for a productive conference since Fellows are trained to conduct brainstorming sessions as well as to offer feedback on drafts. Writing Center conferences complement, but do not replace, your work with your adviser. Visit www.princeton.edu/writing/appt to choose either a specific Fellow to meet with, or to find the first available conference.

   

Endnote, Refworks, and Zotero

Endnote, Refworks, and Zotero are electronic "bibliographic managers"--software that enables researchers to create their own databases from references found in online library catalogs and indexes, and to automatically format references in any of the standard citation styles. The library offers regular workshops for these products, and also provides extensive online help.