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Grading Practices

Department of Near Eastern Studies
 
Grading Standards and Practices
 
Senior Thesis, Papers, and Exams
 
An A or A- thesis, paper, or exam is one that is good enough to be read aloud in a class. It is clearly written and well organized. It demonstrates that the writer has conducted a close and critical reading of texts, grappled with the issues raised in the course, synthesized the readings, discussions, and lectures, and formulated a perceptive, compelling, and independent argument. The argument shows intellectual originality and creativity, is sensitive to historical or cultural context, is supported by a well-chosen variety of specific examples, and, in the case of a research paper, is built on a critical reading of primary material.
 
A B+ or B thesis, paper, or exam demonstrates many aspects of A grade work but falls short of it in either the organization and clarity of its writing, the formulation and presentation of its argument, or the quality of research. Some papers or exams in this category are solid works containing flashes of insight into many of the issues raised in the course. Others give evidence of independent thought, but the argument is not presented clearly or convincingly.
 
A B- thesis, paper, or exam demonstrates a command of course or research material and understanding of historical or cultural context but provides a less than thorough defense of the writer’s independent argument because of weaknesses in writing, argument, organization, or use of evidence.
 
A C+, C, or C- thesis, paper, or exam offers little more than a mere summary of ideas and information covered in the course, is insensitive to historical or cultural context, does not respond to the assignment adequately, suffers from frequent factual errors, unclear writing, poor organization, or inadequate primary research, or presents some combination of these problems.
 
Whereas the grading standards for written work between A and C- are concerned with the presentation of argument and evidence, a paper or exam that belongs to the D or F categories demonstrates inadequate command of course material.
 
A D thesis, paper, or exam demonstrates serious deficiencies or severe flaws in the student’s command of course or research material.
 
An F thesis, paper, or exam demonstrates no competence in the course or research materials. It indicates a student’s lack of effort in the course.
 
Precepts and Seminars
 
A student who receives an A for participation in discussion in precepts or seminars typically comes to every class with questions about the readings in mind. An “A” discussant engages others about ideas, respects the opinions of others, and consistently elevates the level of discussion.
 
A student who receives a B for participation in discussion in precepts or seminars typically does not always come to class with questions about the readings in mind. A “B” discussant waits passively for others to raise interesting issues. Some discussants in this category, while courteous and articulate, do not adequately listen to other participants or relate their comments to the direction of the conversation.
 
A student who receives a C for discussion in precepts or seminars attends regularly but typically is an infrequent or unwilling participant in discussion.
 
A student who fails to attend precepts or seminars regularly and adequately prepared for discussion risks the grade of D or F.
 
The A+ Grade
 
The grade of A+ is given very rarely and only with the College’s explicit approval. The “A+” is awarded only when the student displays an extraordinary engagement with the topic of the course. For example, the student goes beyond the required readings, by doing independent research on the topic, displays unusual originality in analysis and produces work, written and oral, that is considered of graduate-level quality.
 
The Grade Scale:
 
98-100
A+
94-97
A
90-93
A-
87-89
B+
84-86
B
80-83
B-
77-79
C+
74-76
C
70-73
C-
60-69
D
1-59
F