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  Arts Alive - kickoff story
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Updated Jan. 31, 2002

Arts Alive kicks off Jan. 30 with museum and theater visits

Arts Alive, a program created and funded by Princeton University to provide cultural experiences in New York for up to 10,000 schoolchildren affected by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, began Jan. 30 with visits to the American Museum of Natural History, the museum's Hayden Planetarium and two Broadway shows.

About 130 children and family members from Public Schools 20 and 234 toured the natural history museum and planetarium on Jan. 30. Sixty students and family members attended matinees of "42nd Street" or "Beauty and the Beast." The program continued Jan. 31 and Feb.1, when 100 children and family members visited the museum and planetarium each day.

Ten Princeton students accompanied the children on each museum visit, and three Princeton students went along to each matinee performance.

P.S. 234, located near the World Trade Center disaster site, has been temporarily relocated since Sept. 11, with the children attending classes at St. Bernard's Parochial School. Over the next few days, the school staff will be preparing to move back to the regular school building. Some students at P.S. 20 lost family members in the attacks.

Click here to read more about the program kickoff and see photos.

Arts Alive has three principal goals:

  1. To provide live arts and cultural experiences in New York for up to 10,000 New York City-area schoolchildren from school districts that were most directly affected by the September 11 attacks, either because they were relocated or dislocated as a result of the attacks or because they are in communities that have suffered an especially high concentration of those who lost their lives in the attacks and rescue efforts.
     
  2. To help provide economic sustenance to arts and cultural organizations in New York through the program’s ticket purchases at a time when many such organizations are struggling financially as a result of the September 11 attacks.
     
  3. To provide opportunities for Princeton students who will be participating in the program. to offer workshops and other educational programs to the schoolchildren who will be participating in the program.

The University is conducting the Arts Alive program in partnership with HAI (Hospital Audiences, Inc.), a New York City-based not-for-profit organization that was founded in 1969 to provide access to the arts for New Yorkers who are isolated from the cultural mainstream (including the elderly, individuals with disabilities and at-risk youth) and that recently has been working with the New York City Board of Education to identify ways to provide New York City public school students with opportunities to attend live arts and cultural programs. HAI (which also stands for “hope and inspiration through the arts”) will identify the public schools to be approached, work with the schools to identify the children (from elementary grades through high school) who will participate in the program, identify the most appropriate live arts or cultural experiences for the schoolchildren (including theater, dance, music, art galleries and museums), arrange for tickets and transportation, and work with Princeton students to plan workshops and other educational programs in the schools. HAI is constructing a Web site for the Arts Alive program.

Princeton student participation is being coordinated through the sophomore class of 2004, which has adopted Arts Alive as a special class project, and the student Performing Arts Council, which represents a broad range of student performing groups at Princeton. Princeton students will participate in each of the arts and cultural experiences offered under this program and will develop educational programs to prepare the schoolchildren who are participating to derive full benefit from their experiences.

This program will continue through late April or early May.

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© 2001 The Trustees of Princeton University  Last modified 1/31/02