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Former Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professors in the Environment and the Humanities

John Grim

John Grim

September 2012 – January 2013 Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities and Visiting Lecturer in Religion and the Princeton Environmental Institute at Princeton University

Biography

John Grim is a senior lecturer and senior research scholar at Yale University teaching courses that draw students from the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Divinity School, the Department of Religious Studies, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Yale Colleges. He is coordinator of the Forum on Religion and Ecology with Mary Evelyn Tucker, and series editor of “World Religions and Ecology,” from Harvard Divinity School’s Center for the Study of World Religions (Harvard, 2001). He has been a Professor of Religion at Bucknell University, and at Sarah Lawrence College where he taught courses in Native American and Indigenous religions, World Religions, and Religion and Ecology. His published works include “The Shaman: Patterns of Religious Healing Among the Ojibway Indians” (University of Oklahoma Press, 1983) and edited a volume with Mary Evelyn Tucker entitled “Worldviews and Ecology” (Orbis, 1994, 5th printing 2000), and a Daedalus volume (2001) entitled, “Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change?” Grim is also President of the American Teilhard Association and received his Ph.D. from Fordham University.


Mary Evelyn Tucker

Mary Evelyn Tucker

September 2012 – January 2013 Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities and Visiting Lecturer in Religion and the Princeton Environmental Institute at Princeton University

Biography

Mary Evelyn Tucker is a senior lecturer and senior research scholar at Yale University where she has appointments in the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies as well as the Divinity School. She is a co-founder and co-director with John Grim of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. Together they organized a series of ten conferences on World Religions and Ecology at the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. They are series editors for the ten volumes from the conferences distributed by Harvard University Press. Tucker is also research associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard. In 2011, she completed the Journey of the Universe with Brian Swimme, which includes a book from Yale University Press, a film on PBS, and an educational series of interviews. She is also the author of numerous publications including “Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase” (Open Court Press, 2003), “Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism” (SUNY, 1989), and “The Philosophy of Qi” (Columbia University Press, 2007). She is a member of the Interfaith Partnership for the Environment at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the Earth Charter International Council. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University.

While at Princeton

The joint appointments of Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim with PEI and the Department of Religion allowed for enhanced exploration at Princeton of the intersection between the fields of religion and ecology. Tucker and Grim gave several presentations and generated numerous conversations on the topic of religion and ecology. This included screening their Emmy Award-winning film, Journey of the Universe, a film that draws together scientific discoveries in astronomy, geology, biology, ecology, and biodiversity with humanistic insights. They also co-taught a course entitled Religion, Ecology and Cosmology illustrating how religion, spirituality, ethics and values can make important contributions – alongside science – to address complex ecological issues.


Steve Cosson

Steve Cosson

2009-2010 Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities and Guest Artist at the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University

Biography

Steve Cosson is the founding Artistic Director of the acclaimed investigative theater company The Civilians. With The Civilians, Steve has been the co-writer/director of This Beautiful City (Drama Desk, Drama-League, Lortel Nominations); co-writer/director of Paris Commune; writer/director of the long running hit Gone Missing (New York Times’ Top 10 of 2007 list.); writer/director (I Am) Nobody’s Lunch, (2006 Fringe First award). He has directed at theaters including Hartford Stage, Soho Rep, Williamstown, O’Neill Conference, New Harmony Project and others. He has been a Fulbright Scholar in Colombia and a MacDowell Fellow. His plays have been published by Oberon Books in the UK, Dramatists Play Service, and an anthology published by Playscripts Inc. Mr. Cosson is a graduate of Dartmouth College.


Michael Friedman

Michael Friedman

2009-2010 Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities and Guest Artist at the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University

Biography

Michael Friedman is a founding associate artist of The Civilians, and has been the composer and lyricist for the company’s This Beautiful City, [I Am] Nobody’s Lunch, Gone Missing, and Canard, Canard, Goose? He also wrote music and lyrics for Saved, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, In the Bubble, The Brand New Kid, God’s Ear, and The Blue Demon. His music has also been heard at theaters across the country and in the UK. Film/TV work includes On Common Ground, Beloved, Emile Norman: By His Own Design, Floaters and Affair Game. He is a recipient of a MacDowell fellowship and a Princeton University Hodder Fellowship. He received a 2007 Obie Award for sustained excellence. Michael Friedman earned his Bachelor’s degree at Harvard University where he majored in History and Literature.

While at Princeton

The joint appointments of Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman with PEI and with the Atelier Program at Princeton's Lewis Center for the Arts allowed for an innovative collaboration involving theatre, the creative arts and environmental sciences. With input from Princeton researchers and students and incorporating the talents of experienced theater professionals, Cosson and Friedman created an interpretive theatrical drama with music —The Great Immensity— that examined the current environmental crisis including themes of climate change and global sustainability.

A spring Atelier course, cross listed with the Program in Environmental Studies offered an interdisciplinary mix of undergraduates an opportunity to help shape elements of The Great Immensity production. While at Princeton, Cossen and Friedman offered a three-part dinner series with guest speakers with discussions centering around various themes explored in the context of their creative collaboration. At an evening event for Princeton residents that was jointly sponsored by PEI and D&R Greenway, the Barron visitors discussed the dramatic and technical challenges encountered in producing an expository drama involving environemtnal themes.


David Schlosberg

David Schlosberg

2008-2009 Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities and Visiting Professor at the University Center for Human Values

Biography

David Schlosberg is professor and chair of the Department of Politics and International Affairs at Northern Arizona University, where he teaches political theory and environmental politics. He is also affiliated with the Environmental Science and Policy, Environmental Studies, and Grand Canyon Semester programs. He has had recent work supported by the National Science Foundation, has been a Fulbright Senior Scholar in the Social and Political Theory Program at Australian National University, and has taught at the London School of Economics and Keele University in the U.K. Schlosberg's books include Environmental Justice and the New Pluralism (Oxford 1999), Green States and Social Movements (Oxford 2003, co-authored with John Dryzek, Christian Hunold, and David Downes), Debating the Earth: The Environmental Politics Reader (Oxford 1998, 2nd edition 2005, co-edited with John Dryzek), and, most recently, Defining Environmental Justice (Oxford 2007). In January 2011, Professor Schlosberg will take up a position at Professor of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney.

While at Princeton

During his Barron visiting professorship at Princeton, David Schlosberg was jointly appointed by PEI and the University Center for Human Values. While at Princeton, Schlosberg focused on the scholarship of environmental political theory, climate ethics and urban sustainability. He taught a course on climate justice entitled Environmental, Ecological and Climate Justice and gave several public lectures including presentations at the David Bradford Series and as part of the Ethics and Climate Change Lecture Series. Professor Schlosberg collaborated with PEI leadership and community leaders to explore outreach opportunities in local urban environments.


Kimberly K. Smith

Kimberly K. Smith

2007-2008 Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities and Visiting Associate Professor in the Center for African American Studies

Biography

Kimberly Smith is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Michigan and her law degree at the Boalt School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, and teaches courses in constitutional law, the judicial process, American political thought, political theory, and environmental politics and policy. She has published articles in the Journal of Political Philosophy, Wisconsin Journal of Environmental Law, Women's Studies, California Law Review, Rhetoric and Public Affairs, and Environmental Ethics. Prof. Smith's first book, The Dominion of Voice: Riot, Reason and Romance in Antebellum Politics (University Press of Kansas, 1999) was awarded the 2001 Merle Curti Intellectual History Award by the Organization of American Historians. Her second book, Wendell Berry and the Agrarian Tradition: A Common Grace, was published in 2003, and her third book, African American Environmental Thought: Foundations was published by University Press of Kansas in Spring 2007.

While at Princeton

The first Barron Visiting Professor, Kimberly Smith’s research and teaching centered on introducing environmental justice themes to the Princeton University community. Jointly appointed within PEI and the Center for African American Studies, Smith co-taught a course, American Studies: Environmental Justice, with professor Melissa Harris-Lacewell to an interdisciplinary mix of students.

While at Princeton, Smith organized a two-day conference entitled A Different Shade of Green: Race, Place and Environmental Justice as part of the Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 Ethics and the Environment Lecture Series. She made multiple pubic presentations including at the David Bradford Seminars in science, technology and environmental policy and at a joint PEI and D&R Greenway sponsored forum at the Johnson Education Center for a community audience. Smith actively engaged all members of the Princeton University on topics in environmental justice. Her work with undergraduate students was formative in the creation of the Princeton Environmental Action student group and she organized a multipart film series featuring environmental justice themes..