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2014 Freshman Expo

Sep 8, 2014  ·  9:30 a.m.12:00 p.m.  ·  Frick Chemistry Lab


Welcome Class of 2018! Please join us on Monday, September 8th in the Frick Chemistry Lab for the Academic Expo. Come meet with current ENV students and administration to discuss the Environmental Studies Program. We look forward to meeting you at the Expo.

Senior Thesis Research Funding Application Process Commences

Sep 15, 2014  ·  12:00 p.m.11:55 p.m.  ·  Location: N/A


Princeton Environmental Institute sponsors several competitive senior thesis research funds to which undergraduates may apply for support for travel, research and supplies for field work and research on an environmental topic in the U.S. and abroad. Applications are open through the Student Activities Funding Engine (S.A.F.E.) staring on Monday, September 15th , 2014.
 
The final deadline to apply is Monday, October 27th , 2014 by 11:59 pm EST.

Stop Saving the Planet!--And Other Tips for 21st-Century Environmentalists, Jenny Price

Sep 23, 2014  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  · 


Is the "save the planet" rhetoric really saving the planet? And what does that even mean? Jenny Price's cultural critique of contemporary American environmentalism tracks the rhetoric through on-the-ground actions and policies, and assesses its usefulness or uselessness for actually grappling--as effectively and as equitably as possible--with our most urgent environmental troubles.

2014 Summer of Learning Symposium

Oct 3, 2014  ·  9:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m.  ·  Campus Club


As a culminating experience to the internship program, students are required to participate in the Summer of Learning (SOL) Fall Symposium. This event allows students to share details of their internships with fellow interns, faculty and research staff and discuss plans for future research and independent work.

Keynote Address for What Arts & Humanities Are Good For Series - by William Cronon

Oct 8, 2014  ·  6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.  · 


As we celebrate in 2014 the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Wilderness Act—which has protected more than 100 million acres of U.S. public land—it’s well worth pondering this remarkable achievement. What do we mean by “wilderness” in the Anthropocene? Any answer to this question requires the humanities as much as the sciences, and can only be understood historically. Cronon will trace the changing meanings of wilderness in American history, and argue for its ongoing importance today and in the future.

William Cronon studies American environmental history and the history of the American West. His research seeks to understand how we depend on the ecosystems around us to sustain our material lives, how we modify the landscapes in which we live and work, and how our ideas of nature shape our relationships with the world around us. He is the author of the influential books Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England and Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; as well as the groundbreaking essay, "The Trouble With Wilderness, or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature," in his edited anthology Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature, which examines the implication of cultural ideas of nature for modern environmental problems. He is completing a new book - Saving Nature in Time: The Environmental Past and the Human Future - on the evolving relationship between environmental history and environmentalism, and on what the two might learn from each other.

What History Is Good For (Panel)

Oct 9, 2014  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  Location: TBD


This event is part of Princeton Environmental Institute series: What Arts & Humanities Are Good For

William Cronon, History, University of  Wisconsin-Madison
Francis Ludlow,  Yale Climate & Energy Institute
John Haldon,  History, Princeton University

Response — Rob Socolow, PEI, Princeton University
Moderator — Jenny Price, PEI, Princeton University

What Literature Is Good For

Oct 16, 2014  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  Location: TBD


This event is part of Princeton Environmental Institute series: What Arts & Humanities Are Good For

Rob Nixon, English, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Stephanie Lemenager,  English, University of Oregon
William Gleason,  English, Princeton University

Response — Lars Hedin, EEB, Princeton University
Moderator — Jenny Price, PEI, Princeton University

Deadline to Apply for Senior Thesis Research Funds

Oct 27, 2014  ·  11:55 p.m.11:55 p.m.  · 


Princeton Environmental Institute sponsors several competitive senior thesis research funds to which undergraduates may apply for support for travel, research and supplies for field work and research on an environmental topic in the U.S. and abroad.
Applications are open through the Student Activities Funding Engine (S.A.F.E.) staring on Monday, September 15th  2014.
The final deadline to apply is Monday, October 27th, 2014 by 11:59 pm EST.

Deadline to Apply for Senior Thesis Research Funds

Oct 27, 2014  ·  11:55 p.m.11:55 p.m.  ·  Location: N/A


Princeton Environmental Institute sponsors several competitive senior thesis research funds to which undergraduates may apply for support for travel, research and supplies for field work and research on an environmental topic in the U.S. and abroad. Applications are open through the Student Activities Funding Engine (S.A.F.E.) staring on Monday, September 15th , 2014.
 
The final deadline to apply is Monday, October 27th , 2014 by 11:59 pm EST.

What Arts Are Good For

Nov 13, 2014  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  Location: TBD


This event is part of Princeton Environmental Institute series: What Arts & Humanities Are Good For

Sarah Kanouse,  Art, University of Iowa
Cynthia Smith, Curator for Socially Responsible Design, Cooper-Hewitt
Rachael DeLue, Art & Archaeology, Princeton University

Response — Dan Rubenstein, EEB, Princeton University
Moderator — Jenny Price, PEI, Princeton University