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The U.S. Department of Energy has selected a project led by Princeton University Professor Michael Celia for funding. The project is one of 13 chosen to develop technologies and methodologies for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Celia’s project, which is joint with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Heriot Watt University in Scotland, will develop new modeling capabilities for simulation of CO2 and brine migration in fractured reservoirs. Flow interacti
Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) is the only class of mitigation options able to significantly reduce carbon in the atmosphere. A special issue of the journal Climatic Change explores CDR from the perspectives of integrated assessment, technology optimization, and environmental science.
Forests absorb around one quarter of the carbon dioxide that humans produce, but one small insect pest is jeopardizing this good work, with potentially serious consequences for climate change.
Ask Andrew Bocarsly about the innovation behind Liquid Light, a New Jersey startup company that turns carbon dioxide into fuels and industrial chemicals.
In May 2011, geosciences major Sara Nason ’12, was awarded the Becky Colvin Memorial Award by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Colvin family.
One of the greatest challenges facing today’s policymakers is to find ways to meet the growing global demand for energy and to do so in more sustainable ways.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) has announced $1.1 million in new awards to support climate and energy research at Princeton University.
In the highly politicized world of climate science, public relations can win or lose battles that shape the Earth's future.
Various efforts are underway to find a cheap, efficient and scalable way to recycle the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into the hydrocarbons that fuel civilization
Tanzania's iconic national park must not be divided by a highway, say Andrew Dobson, Markus Borner, Tony Sinclair and 24 others. A route farther south would bring greater benefits to development and the environment.
Researchers at Princeton University are spearheading a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to study the risks and economics of capturing carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, and storing it underground.
Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Keystone Award for Leadership in the Environment.
Serving audiences across the ocean.
An international group of scientists, ethicists, and governance experts meeting here this week has agreed that research into large-scale modification of the planet is "indispensable" given the "threats" posed by climate change.
In order to be sure that agreed emissions reductions are taking place, the U.S. must deploy new monitoring technologies, according to a new report.
Participants shared research findings in climate science, carbon capture and storage and policy from the past year and discussed prospects of future domestic and international climate policy.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Hoping to help fix the Earth's atmosphere, Catherine Peters recently found herself 4,100 feet underground.
Natural ecosystems and biodiversity must be made a bulwark against climate change, not a casualty of it, argue Will R. Turner, Michael Oppenheimer and David S. Wilcove.
Catherine Peters, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Acting Director of the Energy Grand Challenge program, is leading a university project to evaluate carbon storage, newly funded by the Department of Energy.
The United States could meet projected growth in energy demand through 2030 with existing technologies, but the nation's long-term energy sustainability will require an enduring commitment, by both the public and private sectors, to developing, demonstrating and deploying new technologies and energy sources, according to a National Academy of Sciences committee chaired by Princeton Professor and President Emeritus Harold T. Shapiro.
With a sustained national commitment, the United States could obtain substantial energy-efficiency improvements, new sources of energy, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions through the accelerated deployment of existing and emerging energy technologies, according to America's Energy Future: Technology and Transformation, the capstone report of the America's Energy Future project of the National Research Council, the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of
Biofuels derived from renewable sources can be produced in large quantities and address many problems related to fossil fuels, including greenhouse gas emissions, but only if they are made from certain sources, according to a new article by a team of scientists and policy experts that included several Princeton researchers.
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) will host a symposium and conference Wednesday through Friday, April 29-May 1, to address challenges related to agriculture and climate change as the global population expands.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
Princeton Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Fred Dryer has a lofty goal: end the nation's reliance on oil for jet travel.
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.