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Business leaders and Princeton University scientists gathered for a daylong meeting to explore solutions to problems of energy and the environment.
Princeton University is seeking outstanding applications to fill a new tenure-track faculty position in water science.
In a small room tucked in a corner of Princeton University's MacMillan Building, computer screens cover the wall and line desktops, each displaying a colorful cornucopia of data used to monitor campus energy equipment and limit the University's energy consumption.
PEI is pleased to announce a call for proposals to encourage research, teaching, and mentorship focused on multidisciplinary aspects of global climate change and energy.
Turning solid waste into fuel and reducing greenhouse gases emitted in making concrete are the two innovations funded by the Princeton Energy and Environment Corporate Affiliates Program.
Converting a standard shipping container into a sustainable source of energy for remote or disaster-torn regions, Princeton students took top honors in an EPA national competition.
Led by principal investigator Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, researchers have used microscopic folds on the surface of photovoltaic material to significantly increase the power output of flexible, low-cost solar cells.
Craig Arnold has found a surprising link between battery life and the day-to-day physical forces acting on an overlooked battery component.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) has announced $1.1 million in new awards to support climate and energy research at Princeton University.
Robert Socolow reflects on the need for the global community to find a new starting point for action on climate change.
PEI Visiting Professor George Hawkins '83 promotes sustainability as head of The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority.
Sandra McCardell '76, has pursued a rather eclectic career since graduation - although her efforts have always managed to be in "The Spirit of Service."
The Republican victory in November will create huge challenges for the Obama administration in accomplishing its environmental policy objectives.
This course is an introduction to the study of environmental systems. Students will use quantitative analysis to examine three of today's most pressing issues: energy, water, and food.
Almost anywhere he looks, Princeton professor Craig Arnold sees energy. "Plants convert light to sugar -- this is chemical energy," Arnold told students in his freshman seminar on "Science and Technology for a Sustainable Future." "Cars take chemical energy and convert it to linear motion. We convert electrical energy into visible light by using a light bulb."
Various efforts are underway to find a cheap, efficient and scalable way to recycle the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into the hydrocarbons that fuel civilization
Princeton University researchers will participate in a $122 million research project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop technologies and educational programs to make buildings more energy efficient.
Without aggressive action to reduce soot emissions, the time table for carbon dioxide emission reductions may need to be significantly accelerated in order to achieve international climate policy goals such as those set forth in last December's Copenhagen Accord.
A Pakistani garbage dump seems like an unlikely place to find a solution to extreme poverty. But then again, the group of students from Princeton and Rutgers universities who plan to convert garbage into hope is an unlikely team.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
Four Princeton faculty members have been named the recipients of Graduate Mentoring Awards by the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning and will be honored during the Graduate School's hooding ceremony on Monday, May 31, in McCarter Theatre.
Straining between remnants of the old paradigm and integration into the new.
Princeton in Africa has expanded significantly over the last decade, and many of its graduates have remained involved with issues in Africa.
Burning plutonium and other fissile materials in nuclear reactors may be a good way to get rid of the dangerous materials.
If you want to save the planet, think for a minute about the simple plastic cup. Eight or 12 ounces, perhaps emblazoned with a Princeton logo — the University goes through thousands of them each month.
Awards, totaling $5.7 million, cover four areas: machine learning, the use of mobile phones as data collection devices for public health and environment monitoring, energy efficiency in computing, and privacy.
The recipients, Craig Arnold, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will receive funding for projects that will be integrated teaching and research initiatives within the Siebel Energy Grand Challenge.
Though experts may dispute the role of human activity in climate change, evidence is mounting that temperatures and sea levels are rising.
The Gulf region relies upon foreign sources for 60% of its food supply. Agriculture in this region is declining.
When the more than 100 students completed internships this summer, they had at least one more commitment.
Regarding his plans for the Oil, Energy and Middle East Initiative, teaching and research.
In its first report since adopting a Sustainability Plan in February 2008, Princeton University states that on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased for the first time since the University's energy-efficient cogeneration plant was installed in 1996.
At the moment, the roof above Dormitory A of the redeveloped Butler College complex is a "green" roof only in the most technical sense of the phrase.
The new dormitories at Princeton University are already covered in green -- but not the traditional green ivy of the Ivy League.
The United States could meet projected growth in energy demand through 2030 with existing technologies, but the nation's long-term energy sustainability will require an enduring commitment, by both the public and private sectors, to developing, demonstrating and deploying new technologies and energy sources, according to a National Academy of Sciences committee chaired by Princeton Professor and President Emeritus Harold T. Shapiro.
With a sustained national commitment, the United States could obtain substantial energy-efficiency improvements, new sources of energy, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions through the accelerated deployment of existing and emerging energy technologies, according to America's Energy Future: Technology and Transformation, the capstone report of the America's Energy Future project of the National Research Council, the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research. The award recognizes Socolow’s research on energy conservation, renewable energy and technologies to reduce CO2 emissions, which has influenced international policies on energy and the environment.
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research.
The second round of initiatives seeking to improve sustainability on Princeton's campus have been funded under the auspices of the University's Sustainability Plan.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) will host a symposium and conference Wednesday through Friday, April 29-May 1, to address challenges related to agriculture and climate change as the global population expands.
The project incorporates many sustainability features, including green roofs on more than half of the buildings.
The first round of initiatives has been funded under the auspices of the research, education and civic engagement section of the University's new Sustainability Plan.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
For the second consecutive year since adopting a Sustainability Plan, Princeton University's on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased.