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Imagine extraterrestrials come to Earth, seeking to understand human life. They dangle recording devices beneath the clouds or occasionally tag people with retrievable recorders.
Two graduate students were selected to receive the Mary and Randall Hack ‘69 Graduate Award in support of their innovative research on water and water-related topics with implications for the environment. The 2013 recipients are Carole Dalin from Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Xingli Giam from the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Carole Dalin In her doctoral research, Dalin has focused on “virtual water trade”, the virtual transfers of
Four graduate students were selected to receive the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) Walbridge Fund Graduate Award in support of their dissertation research at Princeton.
Eleven graduate students have been selected to join the Princeton Energy and Climate Scholars Program for the 2013-2014 academic year. The 11 newly selected students, hailing from nine (9) departments across campus, will contribute a wide range of climate- and energy-related expertise to the existing group of PECS scholars.  Collectively, their interests include: international climate agreements, climate and energy policy and equity in decision-making, battery technology, fuel propert
A team of five Princeton engineering graduate students is leading a yearlong field research project using new laser sensors to measure pollutants with unprecedented sensitivity.
From June 18-22, follow a group of eight Princeton graduate students as they report on the international environmental negotiations taking place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Four graduate students have been awarded 2012 PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellowships by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
The latest campus and local community green initiatives will be showcased at Princeton University's Sustainability Open House from 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, in the Chancellor Green Rotunda.
Various efforts are underway to find a cheap, efficient and scalable way to recycle the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into the hydrocarbons that fuel civilization
Two PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellows, Ning Lin and Luke MacDonald, graduated in June 2010 with Ph.D.s from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in addition were awarded the Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
A Pakistani garbage dump seems like an unlikely place to find a solution to extreme poverty. But then again, the group of students from Princeton and Rutgers universities who plan to convert garbage into hope is an unlikely team.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
The recipients include: Kevin Loutherback, Electrical Engineering; Dalin Shi, Geosciences; and Ann Carla Staver, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.
Serving audiences across the ocean.
Straining between remnants of the old paradigm and integration into the new.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
Learn more about Smith's semester as a BP-Vann Fellow and the course he is teaching.
After the disaster the need skyrocketed, inspiring a team of Princeton researchers to launch a one-year effort to develop, deploy and test two novel disaster-relief technologies -- a rainwater harvester and filtration system, and a wind turbine for renewable energy production.
Rising acid levels in the world's oceans appear to be robbing the tiny animals that form the bedrock of the marine food web of a vital nutrient.
Baker is in residence at PEI for the fall 2009 semester. A native of Texas, she is Director, Well Planning and Geotechnical Operations at BP.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Franz, a third year Ph.D. student was awarded a $10,000 grant to continue his research.
In its first report since adopting a Sustainability Plan in February 2008, Princeton University states that on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased for the first time since the University's energy-efficient cogeneration plant was installed in 1996.
After more than a decade of inquiry, a Princeton-led team of scientists has turned the tables on a long-standing controversy to re-establish an old truth about nitrogen mixing in the oceans.
In his new book, "The Princeton Guide to Ecology," Princeton professor Simon Levin has tapped more than 130 experts to compile a concise, authoritative one-volume reference to the major subjects and concepts in ecology.
The second round of initiatives seeking to improve sustainability on Princeton's campus have been funded under the auspices of the University's Sustainability Plan.
A team of researchers led by Princeton University scientists has found for the first time that tropical rainforests, a vital part of the Earth's ecosystem, rely on the rare trace element molybdenum to capture the nitrogen fertilizer needed to support their wildly productive growth.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
The first round of initiatives has been funded under the auspices of the research, education and civic engagement section of the University's new Sustainability Plan.
After a competitive review process, Princeton University's Cooperative Institute for Climate Science has been selected as a collaborative research partner by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
If you were a zebra, how would you spend your days? Daniel Rubenstein, director of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, has been pursuing this question for years.
Several days into their spring break, 14 Princeton students found themselves in the middle of the Arizona desert, with nighttime temperatures in the 30s and no running water or electricity.
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
The earth is growing warmer, thanks to elevated concentrations of greenhouse gases, and the vast majority of scientists now believe that human activity, especially the burning of fossil fuels, is primarily responsible.
For the second consecutive year since adopting a Sustainability Plan, Princeton University's on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased.