Skip over navigation
Share this:

Archive

The fall foliage season in some areas could come much later and possibly last a little longer by the end of the century as climate change causes summer temperatures to linger later into the year.
The Southern Ocean that encircles Antarctica lends a considerable hand in keeping Earth's temperature hospitable by soaking up half of the human-made carbon in the atmosphere and a majority of the planet's excess heat.
The U.S. Department of Energy has selected a project led by Princeton University Professor Michael Celia for funding. The project is one of 13 chosen to develop technologies and methodologies for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Celia’s project, which is joint with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Heriot Watt University in Scotland, will develop new modeling capabilities for simulation of CO2 and brine migration in fractured reservoirs. Flow interacti
The world's accounting system for carbon emissions, run by the United Nations, disregards capital investments in future coal-fired and natural-gas power plants that will commit the world to several decades and billions of tons of greenhouse gas emissions.
Researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh find first evidence that natural selection favors an individual’s tolerance to infection.
Princeton researchers supported by the Grand Challenges Program have found, overall, water availability has increased in African maize-growing regions, with exceptions in parts of East Africa.
Simon Levin, the George M. Moffett Professor of Biology at Princeton University, was elected a foreign member of the Lombard Institute Academy of Science and Letters.
Bryan Grenfell, the Kathryn Briger and Sarah Fenton Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs, has joined the Board of Governors of the Wellcome Trust, effective September. The Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation focused on improving human and animal health, noted Grenfell's more than 30 years of experience in researching the population dynamics of infectious diseases.
Global use of antibiotics is surging according to Princeton University researchers who have conducted a broad assessment of antibiotic consumption around the world. The study, "Global Trends in Antibiotic Consumption, 2000-2010," found that worldwide antibiotic use has risen a staggering 36 percent over those 10 years, with five countries — Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS)— responsible for more than three-quarters of that surge, according to study auth
Although scenes of people fleeing from dramatic displays of Mother Nature’s power dominate the news, gradual increases in an area’s overall temperature actually lead more often to permanent population shifts.
Leaders from industry and academia met recently at Princeton University to discuss three big questions surrounding the broad theme of "water": infrastructure, the water/energy nexus, and industrial water.
A five-year study led by Princeton University researchers suggests that certain wild African animals, particularly elephants, could be a boon to human-raised livestock because of their voracious appetite for the toxic and invasive plant Solanum campylacanthum, or the Sodom apple.
Princeton University researchers found that as water freezes it takes on a sort of split personality wherein, at very cold temperatures and above a certain pressure, it may split into two liquid forms.
New members: Jane Baldwin, Cleo Chou, Gregory Ferguson-Cradle, Bu Guo, Janam Jhaveri, Qi Li, Wei Peng, and Josh Spechler. Photos courtesy of PEI Staff.   Eight graduate students have been selected to join the Princeton Energy and Climate Scholars Program (PECS) for the 2014-2015 academic year. Representing six (6) departments across campus, the eight (8) newly selected students will contribute a wide range of climate- and energy-related expertise to the existing group of PECS schol
Princeton University's Michael Oppenheimer was one of four scientists who testified on May 29th before the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology about the need for greater transparency.
Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment (ACEE) have announced awards totaling $780,000 to support eight (8) innovative projects in energy and the environment.
A new study conducted by Princeton University and University of Oxford researchers suggests that climate scientists should reexamine how to effectively and more regularly engage the public.
On Friday, May 9th, the Princeton Environmental Institute hosted its annual Discovery Day—a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on environmental topics.
The Carbon Mitigation Initiative (CMI) held its 13th annual meeting at Princeton University on April 15 and 16, 2014. More than 90 participants gathered to discuss CMI’s most recent initiatives.
The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies, has elected Robert Socolow as a member.
Princeton Energy and Climate Scholars Program (PECS) representatives describe their recent trip to India and reflect upon their overall experience.
With only the contents of a small plastic suitcase, seven Princeton University students were able to bring light to — and improve lives in — a remote village in Peru during their spring break March 15-22.
Simon Levin, the George M. Moffett Professor of Biology at Princeton University, has been awarded the 2014 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement.
On a recent afternoon, 16 Princeton students pondered a sentence in a Saveur magazine story about candy shops in Buffalo, N.Y. The next afternoon, 16 other students explored questions of ethics spawned by a Rolling Stone article.
Simon Levin, the George M. Moffett Professor of Biology at Princeton University, has been awarded the 2014 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement for bridging ecological research and environmental policy, economics and social science.
With support from the Grand Challenges Program, Princeton University researchers and colleagues have confirmed that during the last ice age iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive in a region of the Southern Ocean.
PEI is pleased to cosponsor Princeton's first International Service Trip in collaboration with the PACE, Andlinger, and Keller Centers. Five students will travel to Peru to install solar suitcases and explore issues of water and energy supply.
To All Princeton Graduate Students: The Faculty Board of Princeton Climate and Energy Scholars (PECS) is seeking applications from talented and highly motivated graduate students throughout the University who are conducting research within the broad area of climate and energy. PECS is designed to enhance the graduate research experience by encouraging students to transcend the boundaries of their fields. PECS fosters a common intellectual adventure. Since the creation of the group in 2008, PEC
Two Princeton University professors have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, which honors significant contributions to engineering research and education. Jennifer Rexford, the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor in Engineering and professor of computer science, was recognized for her contributions to the operational stability of large computer networks. Robert Schapire, the David M. Siegel '83 Professor in Computer Science, was elected for his contributions to machine l
Two ENV students, Alexandra Kasdin ‘14 and Claire Gallagher ’14, are among 28 Princeton undergraduates featured in a global summer interactive map.
A Princeton University Grand Challenges research team has created a model to evaluate how a human response to climate change may alter the agricultural utility of land.
The Princeton Environmental Institute and the Andlinger Center are pleased to announce a joint call for proposals for innovative research, teaching and mentorship in energy and the environment. Deadline for applications is March 1.
Ramanan Laxminarayan spearheads Lancet Infectious Diseases Commission report on global solution to antibiotic resistance including the impact on the environment.
Jorge Sarmiento and Daniel Sigman are among Princeton researchers pushing through the challenging conditions of the Southern Ocean because they want to learn more about the waters at the bottom of the globe.
David Medvigy is lead author of a study highlighting how destruction of the Amazon rainforest could affect climate elsewhere.
"The Matriarch" follows the life of Jada, an elephant and the matriarch of her family who has survived a brutal poaching attack.
“Curse of the Gazelle King” investigates the elusive lives of Grant's Gazelles through one man's story about a young gazelle named Lenana.
Civil and environmental engineering professor Eric Wood and his research team have developed a drought monitoring and forecast system for sub-Saharan Africa.
Film explores the ways in which the clubs are using experiential learning to educate students about local conservation issues, and how the students then share what they've learned with their families and villages as well.
“Realignments: A Zebra Story” examines the differences in appearance and behavior of the two zebra species in Kenya, providing insight into the endangerment of the Grevy's zebras and their uncertain future.
On October 4, 2013, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) held its sixth annual Summer of Learning (SOL) Symposium.
Over the course of six weeks in the Global Seminar "Documentary Filmmaking in Kenya: The Art of Science Storytelling," 15 Princeton students were trained in video production, screenwriting and editing to produce short documentaries.
In the Laikipia region of central Kenya, where the land hugs the equator in the shadow of Mt. Kenya, 15 Princeton students and five Kenyan students discovered this summer that there's no smartphone app for figuring out where the gazelles are.
Michael Oppenheimer, geoscientist and PEI associated faculty member, discusses the first of three reports to be released by the IPPC on their fifth assessment of global warming.
New research by geosciences professor Daniel Sigman and colleagues indicates that the cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of a nutrient essential to the health of the ocean.
In the Summer of 2013, 73 Princeton undergraduates affiliated with the Princeton Environmental Institute held 8-12 week environmental assignments with faculty-led research projects and as interns with NGOs, government, industry, and academic enterprises in 12 foreign countries and 5 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.
Princeton geosciences professor Michael Bender, an internationally recognized authority on paleoclimate, provides a concise, comprehensive, and sophisticated introduction to the subject.
The damage scientists expect climate change to do to crop yields can differ greatly depending on which type of model was used to make those projections, according to research based at Princeton University.
Michael Oppenheimer is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University. He is the Director of the Program in Science,Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) at the Woodrow Wilson School and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program, Princeton Environmental Institute, and The Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies.
In two recent papers in the journals Nature Climate Change and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the researchers present a probabilistic assessment of the Antarctic contribution to twenty-first century sea-level change. A Princeton University release reports that their methodology folds observed changes and models of different complexity into unified projections that can be updated with new information. This approach provides a consistent means to integrate the potentia
"The River of Muddy Water," looks at the many challenges to water security in Kenya by examining the confluence of Maasai farmers who rely on the Ewaso Ng'iro river for virtually all their water needs.
The Grand Challenges Program is helping to fund the testing of a novel wind/solar hybrid system for use in disaster-torn regions.
The Princeton Environmental Institute has been ranked number two in a standardized global ranking by the International Center for Climate Governance (ICCG).
Four Princeton University researchers took part in the June 11 report, "A Stronger, More Resilient New York," a comprehensive analysis of New York City's climate risks and proposed steps for preparing for future climate events.
Eleven graduate students have been selected to join the Princeton Energy and Climate Scholars Program for the 2013-2014 academic year. The 11 newly selected students, hailing from nine (9) departments across campus, will contribute a wide range of climate- and energy-related expertise to the existing group of PECS scholars.  Collectively, their interests include: international climate agreements, climate and energy policy and equity in decision-making, battery technology, fuel propert
The Grand Challenges Program has awarded three New Investigator Grants for 2013-2014. The awards support innovative mentorship of undergraduates working on multidisciplinary aspects of global climate change. Two of the supported projects will allow undergraduates to address issues at the interface of climate and oceans. Jorge Sarmiento, professor of geosciences, will mentor students working on Southern Ocean observations and modeling, arranging for them to work directly wit­­­h his g
In recent years, according to the authors, our understanding of the relationship between climate and extreme weather has sharpened, along with our appreciation of the vast damages such events cause.
Last summer, the Princeton chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB-PU) traveled to La Pitajaya, Peru, to construct the first phase of a potable water system.
On Friday, May 10th, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) hosted Discovery Day 2013 - a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on a wide variety of environmental issues.
A group of high-level energy industry executives and regulators met at Princeton University to discuss distributed electricity generation.
Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) is the only class of mitigation options able to significantly reduce carbon in the atmosphere. A special issue of the journal Climatic Change explores CDR from the perspectives of integrated assessment, technology optimization, and environmental science.
Over 90 participants attended the two-day event. Participants presented new areas of research that complement established efforts already underway in the fields of carbon science, low-carbon energy, fluids and energy, and policy and integration.
Princeton University has appointed as dean for research Pablo Debenedetti, a longtime Princeton engineering professor, vice dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and PEI associated faculty member.
Research outcomes from Princeton Environmental Institute’s Carbon Mitigation Initiative help advance a probabilistic assessment of the Antarctic contribution to 21st-century sea-level change.
Examining a case study of near-death experiences for six healthy men who volunteered to test an experimental drug in London has yielded important insights into potentially deadly over-reactions of the human immune system.
Mung Chiang has been awarded the National Science Foundation’s highest honor for young researchers, the Alan T. Waterman Award.
Along with two fellow undergraduates, senior and former Grand Challenges Health Intern, Raphael Frankfurter, receives Labouisse Award.
The 2013 Carnegie Mellon Dickson prize has been awarded to Geosciences professor François Morel. Morel will receive this award for his contributions to understanding the biological and chemical processes that influence marine ecosystems.
The Faculty Board of Princeton Climate and Energy Scholars is seeking applications from talented and highly motivated graduate students throughout the University who are conducting research within the broad area of climate and energy.
Several associated PEI faculty members attended the inaugural Princeton-Fung Global Forum to discuss population growth, climate change, and other factors determining "The Future of the City."
Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae is a serious danger to older hospitalized patients, with an estimated mortality rate as high as 40 percent. It has generally been treated with broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics. Another class of antibiotics, carbapenems, is used as an antibiotic of last resort for the most persistent infections.
In this study, we examine trends in the resistance of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates from acute care, long-term care, and outpatient settings across different US geographic regions. Using nationally representative surveillance data that encompass a longer time span and larger isolate count than has been used to date, we characterize the epidemiology of third-generation cephalosporin–resistant and carbapenem-resistant phenotypes of K. pneumoniae between 1999 and 2010. Results are stratified by
PEI is pleased to announce a call for proposals to encourage research, teaching, and mentorship focused on multidisciplinary aspects of global climate change and energy.
Instructors: Eric Larson, a research engineer with the Energy Systems Analysis Group of the Princeton Environmental Instituteand lecturer in chemical and biological engineering and inmechanical and aerospace engineering; Sankaran Sundaresan, professor of chemical and biological engineering; and Daniel Giammar, the William R. Kenan Jr. Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching in Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment (on leave from Washing
Through Princeton's Grand Challenges Initiative, Joao Biehl mentors undergraduates working on their senior theses in a variety of global and domestic settings.
Three PEI associated faculty members, Alexander Glaser, M.V. Ramana, and Robert Socolow, are among 17 co-authors of an open letter to President Barack Obama.
Climate change is unwelcome news and the best and worst outcomes consistent with current science are very different. This essay addresses new ways the environmental community can freshen the conversation.
Converting a standard shipping container into a sustainable source of energy for remote or disaster-torn regions, a team of Princeton University students took top honors in an 18-month national competition.
A controversial program that uses the private market to provide affordable malaria treatments to people in Africa has dramatically increased access to care and should be continued, says Ramanan Laxminarayan.
Superstorm Sandy is a sign of more things to come, says Michael Oppenheimer, a climate scientist at Princeton University.
Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor, Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, and graduate student, Carole Dalin, are studying the delicate balance between trade in food and trade in water.
The Andlinger Center recently awarded funding for two collaborative faculty research projects through the Andlinger Innovation Fund.
The Health Grand Challenge (HC) is seeking proposals for innovative research and teaching initiatives that explore multidisciplinary aspects of global health and/or infectious disease.
Pablo Debenedetti studies water at the smallest possible scales — zooming in on molecule-to-molecule interactions — but the implications for large industrial processes and many scientific fields could hardly be greater.
Bacteria - including the MRSA superbug -may be more resistant to our most powerful antibiotics after a winter spurt of prescriptions, says a new study.
Spring/Summer 2012 Grand Challenges update.
A new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online shows how seasonal changes in outpatient antibiotic use – retail sales of antibiotics typically get a boost during the winter – can significantly alter seasonal patterns of drug resistance.
Princeton students were in Peru to scout the area for their newest project: building a pipeline to bring drinking water to La Pitajaya's 150 residents.
Lin will join the civil and environmental engineering department on July 1, 2012.  She earned her Ph.D. from Princeton in 2010 and is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  She was a member of the Princeton and Energy Climate Scholars group from 2008 to 2010. 
From June 18-22, follow a group of eight Princeton graduate students as they report on the international environmental negotiations taking place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Persad reflects on the Rio +20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in her BLOG "Hot and Bothered", hosted by the Alliance for Climate Education.
David Medvigy has released a study showing that day-to-day weather variations are growing more erratic and more extreme for at least one-third of the global climate.
The newly selected students will contribute a wide range of climate- and energy-related expertise to the existing group of PECS scholars.
One of the greatest challenges facing today’s policymakers is to find ways to meet the growing global demand for energy and to do so in more sustainable ways.
Established in 2009, the $25 million endowment fund supports the development of new technologies that have the potential to enable significant scientific and technological advances.
Converting a standard shipping container into a sustainable source of energy for remote or disaster-torn regions, Princeton students took top honors in an EPA national competition.
Led by principal investigator Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, researchers have used microscopic folds on the surface of photovoltaic material to significantly increase the power output of flexible, low-cost solar cells.
Despite the sanctions on Iran and the threatened loss of its export production, the world has no shortage of oil.
Brittany Cesarini (right), a former Development Challenge intern, and Sandra Mukasa, will establish an organization in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to target violence and HIV/AIDS.
Mung Chiang, an electrical engineering professor at Princeton, has been awarded the 2012 Kiyo Tomiyasu Award by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, professor of chemical and bilogical engineering, has been named a young global leader by the World Economic Forum.
Congratulations to Dora Huang ’13, Tristan Perez ’14, and Hannah Safford ’13.
Christina Paxson, dean of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and PEI Associate Faculty Member, has been selected to serve as the next president of Brown University.
In the summer of 2011, five students from Princeton University's Engineers Without Borders (EWB) chapter spent two months in Ashaiman, Ghana, to finish the construction of a community library.
The Faculty Board of Princeton Energy and Climate Scholars (PECS) is seeking applications from highly motivated graduate students who are conducting research within the broad area of climate change and energy. Since the creation of the group in 2008, PECS has typically had a balanced membership across disciplines within engineering, policy, and economics. PECS has been designed to enhance the research experience of Princeton’s graduate students by encouraging the most talented of these student
Winter 2012 Grand Challenges update.
In November 2011 PEI established PIRANHA – Princeton Institute for Rainforests and the Amazon including their Nutrients, Hydrology, and the Atmosphere.
Last August, Hurricane Irene spun through the Caribbean and parts of the eastern United States, leaving widespread wreckage in its wake.
The class focuses on the dynamics of vaccination against infections and the spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.
PEI/GC Grand Challenges Intern, Garnet Abrams, became the first undergraduate student to fly on the NSF Gulfstream-V research aircraft as part of a scientific flight from Alaska to the North Pole.
Craig Arnold has found a surprising link between battery life and the day-to-day physical forces acting on an overlooked battery component.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) has announced $1.1 million in new awards to support climate and energy research at Princeton University.
On September 30 and October 7, PEI hosted its 4th annual Summer of Learning Symposia.
PEI is pleased to announce the appointment of Ramanan Laxminarayan to Research Scholar in the Princeton Environmental Institute.
The award is presented during Class Day to a senior whose activities while at Princeton best represent or exemplify the University's informal motto, "Princeton in the nation's service and in the service of all nations."
Kelly Caylor, PEI associated faculty member, collaborates on a new project: “Coupling Hydrological Forecasts and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa and China.”
Jennifer Rexford, member of PEI associated faculty and Siebel Energy Challenge faculty, receives McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning Graduate Mentoring Award.
Technologies for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere unlikely to slow climate change in near term, according to American Physical Society study led by Robert Socolow.
The Grand Challenges Program has awarded two New Investigator Grants for 2011-2012. One will support a proposal by Michael Bender to develop new methods of measuring plant respiration and photosynthesis rates.
Ramanan Laxminarayan, an associated faculty member of PEI, discusses his research on antibiotic resistance in the Economist.
The Grand Challenges Program was launched in 2007 to help address historically intractable global challenges in energy and climate, sustainable development, and global health. Today, the Program involves over 75 Princeton faculty from 29 academic disciplines and hundreds of students as part of a novel approach to solving these problems.
Princeton seniors Hanna Katz, Karen Campion, Clare Herceg and John Torrey have been awarded 2011 fellowships from ReachOut 56-81, an alumni-funded effort to support yearlong public service projects after graduation.
Taking on global issues, a program pairs faculty and students in real-world research.
Princeton University senior Emma Yates has won a prestigious Churchill Scholarship, which provides support for study at the University of Cambridge to students who show great promise in research.
Bernard Haykel's fascinating selection paints a worrying picture of a country at odds with the cultural riches of its past. With internal conflicts and poor governance, Al Qaeda is the least of its problems.
The Progress Report (PDF) provides a summary of Princeton's Grand Challenges Program including novel research and teaching initiatives that address global environmental issues.
For proponents of clean energy technology, the holy grail is to reach price parity with conventional power sources such as coal. For photovoltaics, this tipping point is generally regarded as a dollar per watt ($1/Wp), a measure that indicates the generation capacity of a cell in peak sunlight.
As more bacteria become resistant to the most powerful drugs in our arsenal, new weapons are getting harder and harder to find. Why we need to change the way we think about treating infection.
The Republican victory in November will create huge challenges for the Obama administration in accomplishing its environmental policy objectives.
Almost anywhere he looks, Princeton professor Craig Arnold sees energy. "Plants convert light to sugar -- this is chemical energy," Arnold told students in his freshman seminar on "Science and Technology for a Sustainable Future." "Cars take chemical energy and convert it to linear motion. We convert electrical energy into visible light by using a light bulb."
Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation today announced the winners of the 16th annual Heinz Awards, honoring the contributions of 10 innovative and inspiring individuals whose work has addressed environmental challenges. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.
Emily Carter, a Princeton professor of engineering and applied mathematics, and eminent physical chemist, has been appointed the founding director of the University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
The oscillations during the past 2.5 million years between ice ages and interglacials were probably triggered by orbital changes, but the observed amplitude and timing of these climate cycles still awaits a full explanation. One notable correlation links lower partial pressure (or concentration) of CO2 with ice ages: changes in CO2 concentration may cause some of the ice-age cooling, but what causes the loss of CO2 is unknown. Daniel Sigman, Mathis Hain and Gerald Haug review the evidence in sup
It is summer in Princeton, and while the humidity and bees have arrived, nearly 100 Princeton undergraduates have left to begin summer internships through the PEI/Grand Challenges Internship Program.
Since Israel’s deadly raid on the Turkish ship Mavi Marmara last month, it’s been assumed that Iran would be the major beneficiary of the wave of global anti-Israeli sentiment. But things seem to be playing out much differently: Iran paradoxically stands to lose much influence as Turkey assumes a surprising new role as the modern, democratic and internationally respected nation willing to take on Israel and oppose America.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
Four Princeton faculty members have been named the recipients of Graduate Mentoring Awards by the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning and will be honored during the Graduate School's hooding ceremony on Monday, May 31, in McCarter Theatre.
Esmann will be recognized for co-founding Global Minimum, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) that has undertaken numerous projects in Sierra Leone aimed at combating the spread of malaria while promoting development in the country.
This has been one of PEI's most enterprising years. We are pleased to share our exciting news with faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
After the disaster the need skyrocketed, inspiring a team of Princeton researchers to launch a one-year effort to develop, deploy and test two novel disaster-relief technologies -- a rainwater harvester and filtration system, and a wind turbine for renewable energy production.
Nine Princeton faculty members are among the 180 artists, scientists and scholars selected from a group of some 3,000 candidates for the 2010 Guggenheim Fellowships.
Princeton seniors James Bryant, Katie Hsih and Fatu Conteh have been awarded 2010 fellowships from ReachOut 56-81 to support yearlong public service projects after graduation.
Awards, totaling $5.7 million, cover four areas: machine learning, the use of mobile phones as data collection devices for public health and environment monitoring, energy efficiency in computing, and privacy.
The recipients, Craig Arnold, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will receive funding for projects that will be integrated teaching and research initiatives within the Siebel Energy Grand Challenge.
At PEI we are approaching 2010 with a fresh sense of optimism. The Institute is strong and vital, as this issue of PEI News clearly illustrates.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
When the more than 100 students completed internships this summer, they had at least one more commitment.
Hoping to help fix the Earth's atmosphere, Catherine Peters recently found herself 4,100 feet underground.
The climate problem is caused by prosperity.
When the more than 100 students who completed internships this summer through the Princeton Environmental Institute and the Grand Challenges Program returned to campus, they had at least one more commitment. As a culminating experience, they were required to report on what they learned during their experiences with faculty, research labs, governmental agencies, nongovernmental organizations, nonprofit organizations and industry enterprises in more than 20 countries. On two Fridays this fall,
Although al-Qaida's leadership, beliefs, and ideology are rooted in Saudi Arabia, the organisation has been all but crushed in the kingdom by a government policy that combines a big carrot and an even bigger stick. The attempted assassination in Jeddah last month of Prince Muhammad bin Nayef, the deputy interior minister for security affairs, demonstrates both elements of the Saudi strategy, and how a bold attempt by al-Qaida to revive its fortunes has failed.
On September 25, 2009, The Princeton Environmental Institute held its second annual Summer of Learning Symposium.
Daniel Sigman, a Princeton University biogeochemist who has conducted pioneering work exploring the large-scale systems that have supported life on the planet throughout the millennia, has been selected as a 2009 MacArthur Fellow.
As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), Princeton University has received more than $17 million in research funding from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.
Catherine Peters, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Acting Director of the Energy Grand Challenge program, is leading a university project to evaluate carbon storage, newly funded by the Department of Energy.
Emily Carter, the Arthur W. Marks '19 Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Applied and Computational Mathematics, has been elected a member of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science.
Classes are out, but learning is a central summertime pursuit for many Princeton students as they participate in a range of activities around the world.
With a sustained national commitment, the United States could obtain substantial energy-efficiency improvements, new sources of energy, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions through the accelerated deployment of existing and emerging energy technologies, according to America's Energy Future: Technology and Transformation, the capstone report of the America's Energy Future project of the National Research Council, the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of
Biofuels derived from renewable sources can be produced in large quantities and address many problems related to fossil fuels, including greenhouse gas emissions, but only if they are made from certain sources, according to a new article by a team of scientists and policy experts that included several Princeton researchers.
Engineering professor Winston (Wolé) Soboyejo discusses his camel solar refrigerator project, which may improve vaccine delivery in remote areas of Kenya and Ethiopia.
The cap-and-trade law that is solving the acid rain problem is a very rare species: an unmitigated public policy triumph.
Just months before world leaders are scheduled to meet to devise a new international treaty on climate change, a research team led by Princeton University scientists has developed a new way of dividing responsibility for carbon emissions among countries.
Christina Paxson, a Princeton faculty member since 1986 who is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Economics, has been selected as dean of the University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Her appointment is effective July 1.
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research. The award recognizes Socolow’s research on energy conservation, renewable energy and technologies to reduce CO2 emissions, which has influenced international policies on energy and the environment.
Princeton University will be home to a new $20 million energy research center for combustion science as part of a federal initiative to spur discoveries that lay the groundwork for an economy based on clean replacements for fossil fuels.
The 2008 - 2009 Ethics and Climate Change (ECC) Lecture Series appeared on iTunes U, UChannel, and YouTube, and over 10,000 people viewed or downloaded the lectures from these sites.
For Trenton Franz, the one drawback to being a football star at the University of Wyoming -- he helped lead his team to its first bowl victory in 38 years -- was missing out on the chance to study abroad. His graduate work at Princeton has more than filled the gap. Working with civil engineering professors Michael Celia and Kelly Caylor, Franz studies the interactions among climate, water and vegetation in dryland ecosystems in central Kenya. By the time he earns his Ph.D., he will have spent
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
President Shirley M. Tilghman comments on Princeton's focus on energy and the environment.
If you were a zebra, how would you spend your days? Daniel Rubenstein, director of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, has been pursuing this question for years.
In many ways, H. Vincent Poor, a 1977 graduate alumnus who became dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in June 2006, epitomizes Princeton's tradition of the teacher-scholar.
A new report should spur public debate about how science and technology can best sustain the earth while furthering the goals of humanity, according to Robert Socolow, one of 18 maverick thinkers convened by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) to map the greatest technological challenges of this century.
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Princeton faculty members have been invited to submit proposals by Monday, Sept. 17, for seed grants for projects under a new teaching and research program focused on important issues that share dominant environmental, political, social and engineering dimensions
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
During Summer 2011, 111 Princeton undergraduates travelled to 21 countries for environmental internships. The following slideshow captures the diversity of their experiences.
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.
For the second consecutive year since adopting a Sustainability Plan, Princeton University's on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased.
While Emily Carter was in Germany this week accepting an award from the German Chemical Society, she gave this lecture.
Several Princeton undergraduates spent this summer immersed in local environmental issues.
A network of dashboard-mounted phones can collect data on traffic lights and tell drivers how to avoid inefficient stopping and starting.
Sigman's research provides new evidence of a tight connection between high dust input to the Southern Ocean and the emergence of the deep glaciations that characterize the past one million years.
Oppenheimer defines CO2, methane, and infrared radiation and how they contribute to global warming.
It was another week of watching often bloody civilian revolt in the Middle East. What's happening now is historic, and what happens next may be even more significant.