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Researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh find first evidence that natural selection favors an individual’s tolerance to infection.
Global use of antibiotics is surging according to Princeton University researchers who have conducted a broad assessment of antibiotic consumption around the world. The study, "Global Trends in Antibiotic Consumption, 2000-2010," found that worldwide antibiotic use has risen a staggering 36 percent over those 10 years, with five countries — Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS)— responsible for more than three-quarters of that surge, according to study auth
In the New York Times Ramanan Laxminarayan discusses the urgent need for a global agreement to manage antibiotic effectiveness as a global public good.
Ramanan Laxminarayan spearheads Lancet Infectious Diseases Commission report on global solution to antibiotic resistance including the impact on the environment.
Examining a case study of near-death experiences for six healthy men who volunteered to test an experimental drug in London has yielded important insights into potentially deadly over-reactions of the human immune system.
Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae is a serious danger to older hospitalized patients, with an estimated mortality rate as high as 40 percent. It has generally been treated with broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics. Another class of antibiotics, carbapenems, is used as an antibiotic of last resort for the most persistent infections.
In this study, we examine trends in the resistance of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates from acute care, long-term care, and outpatient settings across different US geographic regions. Using nationally representative surveillance data that encompass a longer time span and larger isolate count than has been used to date, we characterize the epidemiology of third-generation cephalosporin–resistant and carbapenem-resistant phenotypes of K. pneumoniae between 1999 and 2010. Results are stratified by
"Our study shows that biodiversity also seems important in boosting economic welfare – probably through its impact on buffering disease outbreaks,” said co-author Andrew Dobson.
Andy Dobson describes himself as genetically English, psychologically Scottish, and at home in an American habitat, where he has lived for the past 29 years.
A controversial program that uses the private market to provide affordable malaria treatments to people in Africa has dramatically increased access to care and should be continued, says Ramanan Laxminarayan.
The Health Grand Challenge (HC) is seeking proposals for innovative research and teaching initiatives that explore multidisciplinary aspects of global health and/or infectious disease.
Bacteria - including the MRSA superbug -may be more resistant to our most powerful antibiotics after a winter spurt of prescriptions, says a new study.
A new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online shows how seasonal changes in outpatient antibiotic use – retail sales of antibiotics typically get a boost during the winter – can significantly alter seasonal patterns of drug resistance.
Brittany Cesarini (right), a former Development Challenge intern, and Sandra Mukasa, will establish an organization in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to target violence and HIV/AIDS.
The award is presented during Class Day to a senior whose activities while at Princeton best represent or exemplify the University's informal motto, "Princeton in the nation's service and in the service of all nations."
As more bacteria become resistant to the most powerful drugs in our arsenal, new weapons are getting harder and harder to find. Why we need to change the way we think about treating infection.
It is summer in Princeton, and while the humidity and bees have arrived, nearly 100 Princeton undergraduates have left to begin summer internships through the PEI/Grand Challenges Internship Program.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
Esmann will be recognized for co-founding Global Minimum, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) that has undertaken numerous projects in Sierra Leone aimed at combating the spread of malaria while promoting development in the country.
Sarah Chambliss ’10 and Josephine Walker ’10 named co-recipients of 2009 Becky Colvin Memorial Award.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
Princeton seniors James Bryant, Katie Hsih and Fatu Conteh have been awarded 2010 fellowships from ReachOut 56-81 to support yearlong public service projects after graduation.
The Officers of the James S. McDonnell Foundation today announced more than $14 million in grants in their ongoing program, the 21st Century Science Initiative
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
When the more than 100 students completed internships this summer, they had at least one more commitment.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
On September 25, 2009, The Princeton Environmental Institute held its second annual Summer of Learning Symposium.
Engineering professor Winston (Wolé) Soboyejo discusses his camel solar refrigerator project, which may improve vaccine delivery in remote areas of Kenya and Ethiopia.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams.
The University has approved two new undergraduate certificate programs for the 2008-09 academic year, one focusing on sustainable energy and another on global health and health policy.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.