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A decades-long debate over how nitrogen is removed from the ocean may now be settled by new research findings from researchers at Princeton University and their collaborators at the University of Washington.
With support from the Grand Challenges Program, Princeton University researchers and colleagues have confirmed that during the last ice age iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive in a region of the Southern Ocean.
Princeton University-led research supported by the Carbon Mitigation Initiative suggests that even if carbon-dioxide emissions came to a sudden halt, our planet could continue to warm for hundreds of years.
Iain Couzin and colleagues are unlocking the secrets of how fish swim in coordinated schools.
Jorge Sarmiento and Daniel Sigman are among Princeton researchers pushing through the challenging conditions of the Southern Ocean because they want to learn more about the waters at the bottom of the globe.
The mystery surrounding the Southern Ocean is just one of the research projects being conducted out of a Princeton University laboratory at the Forrestal Center.
New research by geosciences professor Daniel Sigman and colleagues indicates that the cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of a nutrient essential to the health of the ocean.
Scientists expect climate change and warmer oceans to push the fish that people rely on for food and income into new territory. Results of new research based at Princeton University is reported in the journal Science.
A study of sed­i­ment cores col­lected from the deep ocean sup­ports a new expla­na­tion for how glac­ier melt­ing at the end of the ice ages led to the release of car­bon diox­ide from the ocean.
Whether it's the economics of clean energy, the politics of Washington or claims over the severity of the problem itself, the debate over climate change is loud and crowded. One aspect that often goes overlooked is the Southern Ocean ringing Antarctica at the bottom of the globe. But that, says Jorge Sarmiento, is about to change.
On June 6th, Bess B. Ward, William J. Sinclair Professor of Geosciences, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, was presented the 2012 Procter & Gamble Award in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.
Small eukaryotic phytoplankton are far more important for taking up upwelled nutrients and for transporting atmospheric carbon dioxide into the ocean interior than their abundance implies.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
The oscillations during the past 2.5 million years between ice ages and interglacials were probably triggered by orbital changes, but the observed amplitude and timing of these climate cycles still awaits a full explanation. One notable correlation links lower partial pressure (or concentration) of CO2 with ice ages: changes in CO2 concentration may cause some of the ice-age cooling, but what causes the loss of CO2 is unknown. Daniel Sigman, Mathis Hain and Gerald Haug review the evidence in sup
The recipients include: Kevin Loutherback, Electrical Engineering; Dalin Shi, Geosciences; and Ann Carla Staver, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.
As soon as it became clear that the Deepwater Horizon oil eruption was going to be gushing for a while, anyone with a basic understanding of regional ocean currents, from sea captains to oceanographers, began to wonder: what will happen if the oil gets into the Loop Current?
PEI Research and Center News from Spring/Summer 2010.
Freshman Sarah Bluher spent part of her spring break in the Florida Everglades collecting field samples from an airboat in a water conservation area.
A lot of scientists and conservationists find themselves questioning whether science got its due in the latest round of international negotiations on trade in endangered wildlife.
Rising acid levels in the world's oceans appear to be robbing the tiny animals that form the bedrock of the marine food web of a vital nutrient.
Though experts may dispute the role of human activity in climate change, evidence is mounting that temperatures and sea levels are rising.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
An additional 2 degrees of global warming could commit the planet to 6 to 9 meters (20 to 30 feet) of long-term sea level rise.
Daniel Sigman, a Princeton University biogeochemist who has conducted pioneering work exploring the large-scale systems that have supported life on the planet throughout the millennia, has been selected as a 2009 MacArthur Fellow.
After more than a decade of inquiry, a Princeton-led team of scientists has turned the tables on a long-standing controversy to re-establish an old truth about nitrogen mixing in the oceans.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
After a competitive review process, Princeton University's Cooperative Institute for Climate Science has been selected as a collaborative research partner by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
PEI Professor François M.M. Morel has received the Einstein Chair Professorship from the Institute of Urban Environment (IUE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
Sigman's research provides new evidence of a tight connection between high dust input to the Southern Ocean and the emergence of the deep glaciations that characterize the past one million years.