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An expansion of hydropower planned for the Mekong River could have a catastrophic impact on the river's fishery and people who depend on it. Photo: P. Deetes/Creative Commons
This report is a review of the fish and fisheries section of the Feasibility Study (FS) and of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the Xayaburi hydropower project, with a particular focus on the fish passes proposed as an environmental impact mitigation measure.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
For Trenton Franz, the one drawback to being a football star at the University of Wyoming -- he helped lead his team to its first bowl victory in 38 years -- was missing out on the chance to study abroad. His graduate work at Princeton has more than filled the gap. Working with civil engineering professors Michael Celia and Kelly Caylor, Franz studies the interactions among climate, water and vegetation in dryland ecosystems in central Kenya. By the time he earns his Ph.D., he will have spent
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.