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Antibiotics are no substitute for good public health policy, vaccinations, clean water, and proper sanitation, states PEI senior research scholar Ramanan Laxminarayan.
In a research article published in Science, PEI Associated faculty member Ram Laxminarayan compares antibiotics to a natural resource that must be conserved, such as fisheries or oil.
Global use of antibiotics is surging according to Princeton University researchers who have conducted a broad assessment of antibiotic consumption around the world. The study, "Global Trends in Antibiotic Consumption, 2000-2010," found that worldwide antibiotic use has risen a staggering 36 percent over those 10 years, with five countries — Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS)— responsible for more than three-quarters of that surge, according to study auth
In the New York Times Ramanan Laxminarayan discusses the urgent need for a global agreement to manage antibiotic effectiveness as a global public good.
Ramanan Laxminarayan spearheads Lancet Infectious Diseases Commission report on global solution to antibiotic resistance including the impact on the environment.
Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae is a serious danger to older hospitalized patients, with an estimated mortality rate as high as 40 percent. It has generally been treated with broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics. Another class of antibiotics, carbapenems, is used as an antibiotic of last resort for the most persistent infections.
In this study, we examine trends in the resistance of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates from acute care, long-term care, and outpatient settings across different US geographic regions. Using nationally representative surveillance data that encompass a longer time span and larger isolate count than has been used to date, we characterize the epidemiology of third-generation cephalosporin–resistant and carbapenem-resistant phenotypes of K. pneumoniae between 1999 and 2010. Results are stratified by
A controversial program that uses the private market to provide affordable malaria treatments to people in Africa has dramatically increased access to care and should be continued, says Ramanan Laxminarayan.
Bacteria - including the MRSA superbug -may be more resistant to our most powerful antibiotics after a winter spurt of prescriptions, says a new study.
A new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online shows how seasonal changes in outpatient antibiotic use – retail sales of antibiotics typically get a boost during the winter – can significantly alter seasonal patterns of drug resistance.
The class focuses on the dynamics of vaccination against infections and the spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.
PEI is pleased to announce the appointment of Ramanan Laxminarayan to Research Scholar in the Princeton Environmental Institute.
As more bacteria become resistant to the most powerful drugs in our arsenal, new weapons are getting harder and harder to find. Why we need to change the way we think about treating infection.