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Robert Pringle, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was named one of nine Early Career Fellows nationwide by the Ecological Society of America (ESA). Fellows are elected by ESA members, and the five-year fellowships recognize early-career researchers for their contributions and potential contributions to ecology.
A new video series features Princeton University researchers funded by Grand Challenges working in the biologically rich Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park.
Termites might not top the list of humanity's favorite insects, but new research suggests that their large dirt mounds are crucial to stopping the spread of deserts into semi-arid ecosystems and agricultural lands.
A five-year study led by Princeton University researchers suggests that certain wild African animals, particularly elephants, could be a boon to human-raised livestock because of their voracious appetite for the toxic and invasive plant Solanum campylacanthum, or the Sodom apple.
For a long time Lauren Wyman has been fascinated by the function of ecological systems. So when it came to her senior thesis, the Princeton University ecology and evolutionary biology major posed a question: What happens to these systems when they are disrupted by invasive species?
Robert Pringle, PEI associated faculty member, describes and films his once-in-a-lifetime wildlife siting of a puma chasing a howler monkey.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) is pleased to announce the award of a New Investigator Grant on behalf of the Development Challenge.