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No challenge facing humanity is broader in scope and importance than achieving a sustainable future. Every dimension of our lives is affected, and every discipline and sector of society must be involved in meeting the challenge.
What would Plato suggest we do to restore the earth’s health? Could Plato’s republic offer wisdom to help us save our planet?
From June 18-22, follow a group of eight Princeton graduate students as they report on the international environmental negotiations taking place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Princeton researchers reported in Science that tropical savanna wildfires combined with climate conditions maintain the border between savannas and forests.
U.S. biologists, including PEI associated faculty members Daniel Rubenstein and Ian Couzin, worked with computer scientists to invent a scanner that can identify an individual zebra.
Kelly Caylor, PEI associated faculty member, collaborates on a new project: “Coupling Hydrological Forecasts and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa and China.”
"The middle class ... in the U.S. and other industrialized nations spend money on things we do not need. We could instead donate that money to organizations that make a huge difference in the lives of the world's poorest people."
Sandra McCardell '76, has pursued a rather eclectic career since graduation - although her efforts have always managed to be in "The Spirit of Service."
The latest campus and local community green initiatives will be showcased at Princeton University's Sustainability Open House from 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, in the Chancellor Green Rotunda.
On Sept. 23, 2010, Michael Oppenheimer briefed the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, U.S. House of Representatives, on extreme weather in a warming world.
Tanzania's iconic national park must not be divided by a highway, say Andrew Dobson, Markus Borner, Tony Sinclair and 24 others. A route farther south would bring greater benefits to development and the environment.
Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation today announced the winners of the 16th annual Heinz Awards, honoring the contributions of 10 innovative and inspiring individuals whose work has addressed environmental challenges. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.
Emily Carter, a Princeton professor of engineering and applied mathematics, and eminent physical chemist, has been appointed the founding director of the University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.
This summer's work builds upon PEI's multiyear environmental monitoring program to help improve water quality and ecological balance.
Levin was chosen for his fundamental contributions in theoretical ecology and for his ground-breaking research on integrating different scales in understanding ecological processes.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Keystone Award for Leadership in the Environment.
It is summer in Princeton, and while the humidity and bees have arrived, nearly 100 Princeton undergraduates have left to begin summer internships through the PEI/Grand Challenges Internship Program.
CMI's new tool shows where emitters are today and how the distribution will evolve over the next 20 years.
Without aggressive action to reduce soot emissions, the time table for carbon dioxide emission reductions may need to be significantly accelerated in order to achieve international climate policy goals such as those set forth in last December's Copenhagen Accord.
A Pakistani garbage dump seems like an unlikely place to find a solution to extreme poverty. But then again, the group of students from Princeton and Rutgers universities who plan to convert garbage into hope is an unlikely team.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
At PEI's class day in June, 44 students graduating with certificates in Environmental Studies gathered with faculty and family to celebrate.
Esmann will be recognized for co-founding Global Minimum, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) that has undertaken numerous projects in Sierra Leone aimed at combating the spread of malaria while promoting development in the country.
This has been one of PEI's most enterprising years. We are pleased to share our exciting news with faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends.
Sarah Chambliss ’10 and Josephine Walker ’10 named co-recipients of 2009 Becky Colvin Memorial Award.
Straining between remnants of the old paradigm and integration into the new.
Learn more about Smith's semester as a BP-Vann Fellow and the course he is teaching.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
PEI Research and Center News from Spring/Summer 2010.
After the disaster the need skyrocketed, inspiring a team of Princeton researchers to launch a one-year effort to develop, deploy and test two novel disaster-relief technologies -- a rainwater harvester and filtration system, and a wind turbine for renewable energy production.
Princeton in Africa has expanded significantly over the last decade, and many of its graduates have remained involved with issues in Africa.
Princeton senior Ruth Metzel has been awarded the University's Henry Richardson Labouisse '26 Prize, which will fund her work with a nongovernmental organization to help address environmental issues in Panama.
In its final and most powerful report, a U.N. panel of scientists meeting here describes the mounting risks of climate change in language that is both more specific and forceful than its previous assessments, according to scientists here.
If you want to save the planet, think for a minute about the simple plastic cup. Eight or 12 ounces, perhaps emblazoned with a Princeton logo — the University goes through thousands of them each month.
Since childhood, junior Jason Baum has been aware of environmental issues, switching off lights when leaving a room and turning off the water while brushing his teeth.
When the more than 100 students completed internships this summer, they had at least one more commitment.
A summary of the University's many campus sustainability initiatives.
"Is Copenhagen the watershed or just another missed opportunity — there’s no way to tell yet," said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton University climate scientist who attended the talks. 
Global warming in this century might raise sea levels more than expected in future centuries, says a study that looked at what happened at a time when Neanderthals roamed Europe.
The climate problem is caused by prosperity.
Natural ecosystems and biodiversity must be made a bulwark against climate change, not a casualty of it, argue Will R. Turner, Michael Oppenheimer and David S. Wilcove.
In the fall of 2009, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Lewis Center for the Arts initiated a yearlong collaborative project lying at the intersection of the environment and the performing arts.
On September 25, 2009, The Princeton Environmental Institute held its second annual Summer of Learning Symposium.
Engineering professor Winston (Wolé) Soboyejo discusses his camel solar refrigerator project, which may improve vaccine delivery in remote areas of Kenya and Ethiopia.
Just months before world leaders are scheduled to meet to devise a new international treaty on climate change, a research team led by Princeton University scientists has developed a new way of dividing responsibility for carbon emissions among countries.
Princeton University will be home to a new $20 million energy research center for combustion science as part of a federal initiative to spur discoveries that lay the groundwork for an economy based on clean replacements for fossil fuels.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) will host a symposium and conference Wednesday through Friday, April 29-May 1, to address challenges related to agriculture and climate change as the global population expands.
For Trenton Franz, the one drawback to being a football star at the University of Wyoming -- he helped lead his team to its first bowl victory in 38 years -- was missing out on the chance to study abroad. His graduate work at Princeton has more than filled the gap. Working with civil engineering professors Michael Celia and Kelly Caylor, Franz studies the interactions among climate, water and vegetation in dryland ecosystems in central Kenya. By the time he earns his Ph.D., he will have spent
Several days into their spring break, 14 Princeton students found themselves in the middle of the Arizona desert, with nighttime temperatures in the 30s and no running water or electricity.
A new report should spur public debate about how science and technology can best sustain the earth while furthering the goals of humanity, according to Robert Socolow, one of 18 maverick thinkers convened by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) to map the greatest technological challenges of this century.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.