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Many animals may have a previously under-appreciated ability to make up for lost time with more effort, according to new research publishing this week in PLOS Computational Biology.
In the Laikipia region of central Kenya, where the land hugs the equator in the shadow of Mt. Kenya, 15 Princeton students and five Kenyan students discovered this summer that there's no smartphone app for figuring out where the gazelles are.
PEI faculty member and chair of the ecology and evolutionary biology department, Daniel Rubenstein, and collaborating committee members determine the tools already exist to better manage wild horses and burros on public lands.
In 1974, as a Duke Ph.D. student, Rubenstein began to study why animals cooperate and live socially. He chose to study wild horses because they are a species with no kinship. Today, his students continue this research.
Field ecologists usually depend on observation and genetic data found in excrement to study individual animals. A new barcode-like scanning system could make recognition easier and more accurate.
In a collaboration melding art with science, climate researchers and other members of the Princeton University community joined forces with The Civilians to help create a work-in-progress about global climate change.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
Princeton University's Peter and Rosemary Grant, whose legendary explorations on the bleak Galapagos island of Daphne Major over nearly four decades have produced an array of dazzling insights into evolutionary theory, have been named recipients of the Kyoto Prize.
If you were a zebra, how would you spend your days? Daniel Rubenstein, director of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, has been pursuing this question for years.
Scientists are developing a new branch of network theory to understand zebra communities.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.