Skip over navigation
Share this:

Archive

For a long time Lauren Wyman has been fascinated by the function of ecological systems. So when it came to her senior thesis, the Princeton University ecology and evolutionary biology major posed a question: What happens to these systems when they are disrupted by invasive species?
For the past two years Elizabeth McKenna has been keenly aware — and concerned — that many of the world's coral reefs are in trouble.
Likely common among bacteria, an act of microscopic justice not only ensures the survival of the group's most industrious members, but also could have uses in agriculture, energy, and medicine.
Iain Couzin and colleagues are unlocking the secrets of how fish swim in coordinated schools.
Princeton University research examined the effects of bird-song recordings known as "playbacks" on birds in the wild. Used by birdwatchers to draw reclusive birds out of their hideaways, the playbacks could have potentially negative consequences, especially in terms of diverting a bird's energy from essential tasks such as tending to its nest. The research is out of the lab of David Wilcove, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs.
New research by geosciences professor Daniel Sigman and colleagues indicates that the cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of a nutrient essential to the health of the ocean.
Scientists expect climate change and warmer oceans to push the fish that people rely on for food and income into new territory. Results of new research based at Princeton University is reported in the journal Science.
DAVIS — Two species of bacteria living on the ocean floor have teamed up in a unique symbiotic relationship to form a critical link in the Earth’s nitrogen cycle, reports a research team that includes two University of California, Davis, microbiologists. The scientists, led by researchers affiliated with the University of Southern California, will publish their findings about the novel bacterial partnership Aug. 8 in the journal Nature. At the heart of the study are the long, thin,
Imagine extraterrestrials come to Earth, seeking to understand human life. They dangle recording devices beneath the clouds or occasionally tag people with retrievable recorders.
PEI faculty member and chair of the ecology and evolutionary biology department, Daniel Rubenstein, and collaborating committee members determine the tools already exist to better manage wild horses and burros on public lands.
In his song "Day of the Locusts," the cicadas that "sang off in the distance" as Bob Dylan accepted an honorary degree from Princeton University in 1970 will likely be a bit more distant this year.
In May 2012, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology major Tara Thean '13 received the Becky Colvin Memorial Award to support her research examining the signature whistles of dolphins.
Trees in the con­ti­nen­tal U.S. could send out new spring leaves up to 17 days ear­lier than they did before, accord­ing to a new study by Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity researchers.
A new study that modeled the impact of climate change on more than 600 fish species says that most of those species could shrink by between 14 and 24 percent by the year 2050.
Bonnie Bassler, the Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology, was inducted into the American Philosophical Society's biological sciences class.
Princeton researchers reported in Science that tropical savanna wildfires combined with climate conditions maintain the border between savannas and forests.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) has announced $1.1 million in new awards to support climate and energy research at Princeton University.
Ann Carla Staver is first author of a paper published today in Science.
In the latest issue of Nature, Onstott and several colleagues announced the discovery of a creature one step up on the food chain from bacteria.
U.S. biologists, including PEI associated faculty members Daniel Rubenstein and Ian Couzin, worked with computer scientists to invent a scanner that can identify an individual zebra.
This report is a review of the fish and fisheries section of the Feasibility Study (FS) and of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the Xayaburi hydropower project, with a particular focus on the fish passes proposed as an environmental impact mitigation measure.
PEI Visiting Professor George Hawkins '83 promotes sustainability as head of The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority.
This course is an introduction to the study of environmental systems. Students will use quantitative analysis to examine three of today's most pressing issues: energy, water, and food.
An interview with Emmanuel Kreike, associate professor of history, Princeton University.
Levin was chosen for his fundamental contributions in theoretical ecology and for his ground-breaking research on integrating different scales in understanding ecological processes.
Two members of the Princeton University faculty have been recognized for major contributions to ecological research.
The oscillations during the past 2.5 million years between ice ages and interglacials were probably triggered by orbital changes, but the observed amplitude and timing of these climate cycles still awaits a full explanation. One notable correlation links lower partial pressure (or concentration) of CO2 with ice ages: changes in CO2 concentration may cause some of the ice-age cooling, but what causes the loss of CO2 is unknown. Daniel Sigman, Mathis Hain and Gerald Haug review the evidence in sup
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Despite the challenges and shortcomings, Bhutan's way of conserving the environment and wildlife is worth appreciating, according to participants attending an international conference in Bumthang on “Wildlife research techniques in rugged mountainous Asian landscape” which ended yesterday.
In a collaboration melding art with science, climate researchers and other members of the Princeton University community joined forces with The Civilians to help create a work-in-progress about global climate change.
Sarah Chambliss ’10 and Josephine Walker ’10 named co-recipients of 2009 Becky Colvin Memorial Award.
Using ENV 307as a foundation.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
Princeton senior Ruth Metzel has been awarded the University's Henry Richardson Labouisse '26 Prize, which will fund her work with a nongovernmental organization to help address environmental issues in Panama.
Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, an environmental engineer and pioneer in the field of ecohydrology, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors in all areas of science.
Recently, an analysis of Essential Science IndicatorsSM from Thomson Reuters recognized the work of Dr. Lars Hedin as having the highest percent increase in total citations in the field of Environment & Ecology.
Freshman Sarah Bluher spent part of her spring break in the Florida Everglades collecting field samples from an airboat in a water conservation area.
A lot of scientists and conservationists find themselves questioning whether science got its due in the latest round of international negotiations on trade in endangered wildlife.
Princeton seniors James Bryant, Katie Hsih and Fatu Conteh have been awarded 2010 fellowships from ReachOut 56-81 to support yearlong public service projects after graduation.
Effective Feb. 1, 2010, Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will assume the role of Director, Program in Environmental Studies (ENV) at Princeton Environmental Institute.
The recipients, Craig Arnold, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will receive funding for projects that will be integrated teaching and research initiatives within the Siebel Energy Grand Challenge.
Rising acid levels in the world's oceans appear to be robbing the tiny animals that form the bedrock of the marine food web of a vital nutrient.
Though experts may dispute the role of human activity in climate change, evidence is mounting that temperatures and sea levels are rising.
The Officers of the James S. McDonnell Foundation today announced more than $14 million in grants in their ongoing program, the 21st Century Science Initiative
On June 1, 2009, PEI held it's 15th annual Class Day celebration.
If patterns of globalization over decades could be plotted on a world map, what might they look like and what deeper insights might they reveal, wondered Miguel Centeno.
Natural ecosystems and biodiversity must be made a bulwark against climate change, not a casualty of it, argue Will R. Turner, Michael Oppenheimer and David S. Wilcove.
In its first report since adopting a Sustainability Plan in February 2008, Princeton University states that on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased for the first time since the University's energy-efficient cogeneration plant was installed in 1996.
On September 25, 2009, The Princeton Environmental Institute held its second annual Summer of Learning Symposium.
Daniel Sigman, a Princeton University biogeochemist who has conducted pioneering work exploring the large-scale systems that have supported life on the planet throughout the millennia, has been selected as a 2009 MacArthur Fellow.
After more than a decade of inquiry, a Princeton-led team of scientists has turned the tables on a long-standing controversy to re-establish an old truth about nitrogen mixing in the oceans.
In his new book, "The Princeton Guide to Ecology," Princeton professor Simon Levin has tapped more than 130 experts to compile a concise, authoritative one-volume reference to the major subjects and concepts in ecology.
Princeton University's Peter and Rosemary Grant, whose legendary explorations on the bleak Galapagos island of Daphne Major over nearly four decades have produced an array of dazzling insights into evolutionary theory, have been named recipients of the Kyoto Prize.
Kelly Caylor, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been awarded a Faculty Early Career Development award from the National Science Foundation.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) will host a symposium and conference Wednesday through Friday, April 29-May 1, to address challenges related to agriculture and climate change as the global population expands.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.
You have to love nature, rising junior Stephanie Hill said, when you grow up, as she did, in a remote, pristine village on the shores of a glacier-fed lake in British Columbia.
President Shirley M. Tilghman comments on Princeton's focus on energy and the environment.
The first round of initiatives has been funded under the auspices of the research, education and civic engagement section of the University's new Sustainability Plan.
Princeton ecologist Simon Levin, who has made major contributions in the areas of biological conservation and ecosystem management, has been selected as a foreign member of the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, a venerable Italian academic institute.
Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams.
If you were a zebra, how would you spend your days? Daniel Rubenstein, director of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, has been pursuing this question for years.
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
David Wilcove, one of world's leading experts on endangered species, discusses his new book, No Way Home, which chronicles the decline of the world's animal migrations.
Scientists are developing a new branch of network theory to understand zebra communities.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Claire Kremen studies honeybees and the extinction of species. Saul Griffith is an inventor who is trying, among other things, to develop a process that will bring corrective eyewear to people in the Third World.
Princeton faculty members have been invited to submit proposals by Monday, Sept. 17, for seed grants for projects under a new teaching and research program focused on important issues that share dominant environmental, political, social and engineering dimensions
David Wilcove, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs, has been named a recipient of the 2011 Pioneers of Science Award.
For the second consecutive year since adopting a Sustainability Plan, Princeton University's on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased.
David Wilcove has been named a 2011 Pioneers of Science Award recipient by the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute (HWI).
Several Princeton undergraduates spent this summer immersed in local environmental issues.
Sigman's research provides new evidence of a tight connection between high dust input to the Southern Ocean and the emergence of the deep glaciations that characterize the past one million years.
Animal species all follow the same rule for how common they are in an ecosystem, scientists have discovered. And the rule is simple.