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A five-year study led by Princeton University researchers suggests that certain wild African animals, particularly elephants, could be a boon to human-raised livestock because of their voracious appetite for the toxic and invasive plant Solanum campylacanthum, or the Sodom apple.
Princeton Alumni Weekly interviews Mauzerall about health impacts of air pollution and climate change and what to do about them.
For a long time Lauren Wyman has been fascinated by the function of ecological systems. So when it came to her senior thesis, the Princeton University ecology and evolutionary biology major posed a question: What happens to these systems when they are disrupted by invasive species?
Princeton University will receive a 2013 Air Quality Excellence Award for its sustainability efforts. Each year, the Air Quality Partnership, a program of the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, honors one public and one private institution for their efforts to improve air quality. As warmer weather approaches, so does the onset of ground-level ozone. High levels of ozone pose health risks for everyone, and large segments of the population are considered especially sensitive to ozone
In May 2012, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology major Abby Hewitt ‘13 was awarded the Becky Colvin Memorial Award by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Colvin family.
In a small room tucked in a corner of Princeton University's MacMillan Building, computer screens cover the wall and line desktops, each displaying a colorful cornucopia of data used to monitor campus energy equipment and limit the University's energy consumption.
Denali Barron '09 caving near Chiang Mai, Thailand. Photo courtesy of Denali Barron A passion for the environment leads Princeton students in many different directions after graduation. In Denali Barron’s case, it led her to become an outdoor environmental education professional in Thailand and Colorado. “I love working in the outdoor and experiential education industry because it lies at the cross-section of personal development, global environmental issues, and outdoor ad
The course examines the many links between environment and development in the United States.
Princeton researchers reported in Science that tropical savanna wildfires combined with climate conditions maintain the border between savannas and forests.
U.S. biologists, including PEI associated faculty members Daniel Rubenstein and Ian Couzin, worked with computer scientists to invent a scanner that can identify an individual zebra.
PEI Visiting Professor George Hawkins '83 promotes sustainability as head of The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority.
The latest campus and local community green initiatives will be showcased at Princeton University's Sustainability Open House from 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, in the Chancellor Green Rotunda.
An interview with Emmanuel Kreike, associate professor of history, Princeton University.
Tanzania's iconic national park must not be divided by a highway, say Andrew Dobson, Markus Borner, Tony Sinclair and 24 others. A route farther south would bring greater benefits to development and the environment.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
This summer's work builds upon PEI's multiyear environmental monitoring program to help improve water quality and ecological balance.
Freshman Sarah Bluher spent part of her spring break in the Florida Everglades collecting field samples from an airboat in a water conservation area.
Filling the ENV lab to capacity, students were eager to learn about the environmental studies program.
Natural ecosystems and biodiversity must be made a bulwark against climate change, not a casualty of it, argue Will R. Turner, Michael Oppenheimer and David S. Wilcove.
In the fall of 2009, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Lewis Center for the Arts initiated a yearlong collaborative project lying at the intersection of the environment and the performing arts.
In one corridor, a faculty member was having an animated discussion on the future of the oil supply with two students. At a table, a Dining Services staff member was helping a local high school student with a project on recycling. Behind a bicycle that powered a light bulb, a student organization officer was signing up a new member.
Claire Kremen studies honeybees and the extinction of species. Saul Griffith is an inventor who is trying, among other things, to develop a process that will bring corrective eyewear to people in the Third World.
David Wilcove, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs, has been named a recipient of the 2011 Pioneers of Science Award.
David Wilcove has been named a 2011 Pioneers of Science Award recipient by the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute (HWI).
China, India and Saudi Arabia are trying to secure their food supply by leasing water-rich African land. Doing so is cheaper and easier than using water resources back home, but it could backfire.