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Leaders from industry and academia met recently at Princeton University to discuss three big questions surrounding the broad theme of "water": infrastructure, the water/energy nexus, and industrial water.
On Friday, May 9th, the Princeton Environmental Institute hosted its annual Discovery Day—a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on environmental topics.
Ning Lin *10, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Princeton University, spent two years during her doctoral studies as a Fellow in the Princeton Environmental Institute and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs interdisciplinary fellowship program in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (PEI-STEP). (Photo courtesy of Ning Lin) Ning Lin *10, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Princeton University, is im
Steve Anderson '07 a graduate of the Woodrow Wilson School  currently works at the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of General Counsel in Washington D.C. (Photo courtesy of Steve Anderson '07) Before graduating from Princeton University in 2007, Steve Anderson '07 realized he wanted to pursue a career that combined his passions for environmental policy, science, and economics. For that reason, Anderson - a Woodrow Wilson School major - decided to obtain a cert
Earlier this year, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere reached 400 parts per million (ppm). The last time there was that much CO2 was three million years ago, when sea levels were 24 meters higher than they are today.
Panel of current and former Barron Fellows discussing the field of Environmental Humanities. Rarely do photographers, artistic directors, musicians, novelists, poets, scientists, engineers, and scholars in religion, philosophy, and literature come together for two full-days to explore an emerging field of mutual interest. Such a unique gathering took place during Princeton University’s conference “Environmental Humanities in a Changing World.” Stephen W. Pacala, the
The Clean Water Act has been a success, but it's out-of-date and producing diminishing returns. George Hawkins discusses how it can be modernized.
Three PEI associated faculty members, Alexander Glaser, M.V. Ramana, and Robert Socolow, are among 17 co-authors of an open letter to President Barack Obama.
Climate change is unwelcome news and the best and worst outcomes consistent with current science are very different. This essay addresses new ways the environmental community can freshen the conversation.
Princeton University has one of the most extensive and capable investments in climate science of any institution, suggests Stephen Pacala.
Students in the seminar "Global Environmental Change: Science, Technology and Policy" are examining the issue of climate and sustainability through the lens of many disciplines.
Yes, science is being distorted. But, much more dangerous, it is being rejected.
PEI is pleased to announce the appointment of Ramanan Laxminarayan to Research Scholar in the Princeton Environmental Institute.
"The middle class ... in the U.S. and other industrialized nations spend money on things we do not need. We could instead donate that money to organizations that make a huge difference in the lives of the world's poorest people."
PEI Visiting Professor George Hawkins '83 promotes sustainability as head of The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority.
In the highly politicized world of climate science, public relations can win or lose battles that shape the Earth's future.
What precisely about warming is unequivocal: that it has been ocurring? That it will occur in the future? That the entire problem we call "global warming" is unequivocal in all aspects?
The Morris K. Udall Scholarship aims to attract students into careers in environmental public policy.
Negotiations this year are smaller and more subdued than last year's climate conference in Copenhagen, with fewer heads of government attending the meetings -- and far fewer protests. But some, like climate expert Michael Oppenheimer of Princeton University, say that less attention may translate to more progress on some important issues. In Copenhagen, expectations were raised so high that they obscured reality, he said.
The Republican victory in November will create huge challenges for the Obama administration in accomplishing its environmental policy objectives.
An interview with Emmanuel Kreike, associate professor of history, Princeton University.
On Sept. 23, 2010, Michael Oppenheimer briefed the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, U.S. House of Representatives, on extreme weather in a warming world.
Tanzania's iconic national park must not be divided by a highway, say Andrew Dobson, Markus Borner, Tony Sinclair and 24 others. A route farther south would bring greater benefits to development and the environment.
Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation today announced the winners of the 16th annual Heinz Awards, honoring the contributions of 10 innovative and inspiring individuals whose work has addressed environmental challenges. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.
Emily Carter, a Princeton professor of engineering and applied mathematics, and eminent physical chemist, has been appointed the founding director of the University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
Climate change's impacts on crop yields may force as many as seven million Mexicans to emigrate to the U.S. over the next 70 years, according to research published July 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Keystone Award for Leadership in the Environment.
CMI's new tool shows where emitters are today and how the distribution will evolve over the next 20 years.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Without aggressive action to reduce soot emissions, the time table for carbon dioxide emission reductions may need to be significantly accelerated in order to achieve international climate policy goals such as those set forth in last December's Copenhagen Accord.
Two PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellows, Ning Lin and Luke MacDonald, graduated in June 2010 with Ph.D.s from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in addition were awarded the Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
Despite the challenges and shortcomings, Bhutan's way of conserving the environment and wildlife is worth appreciating, according to participants attending an international conference in Bumthang on “Wildlife research techniques in rugged mountainous Asian landscape” which ended yesterday.
Serving audiences across the ocean.
Straining between remnants of the old paradigm and integration into the new.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
Brain workers like to live near each other. It is easier to keep up with the latest ideas if you keep bumping into other people who work in the same field.
Princeton senior Ruth Metzel has been awarded the University's Henry Richardson Labouisse '26 Prize, which will fund her work with a nongovernmental organization to help address environmental issues in Panama.
Freshman Sarah Bluher spent part of her spring break in the Florida Everglades collecting field samples from an airboat in a water conservation area.
An international group of scientists, ethicists, and governance experts meeting here this week has agreed that research into large-scale modification of the planet is "indispensable" given the "threats" posed by climate change.
A lot of scientists and conservationists find themselves questioning whether science got its due in the latest round of international negotiations on trade in endangered wildlife.
In order to be sure that agreed emissions reductions are taking place, the U.S. must deploy new monitoring technologies, according to a new report.
In its final and most powerful report, a U.N. panel of scientists meeting here describes the mounting risks of climate change in language that is both more specific and forceful than its previous assessments, according to scientists here.
Participants shared research findings in climate science, carbon capture and storage and policy from the past year and discussed prospects of future domestic and international climate policy.
If you want to save the planet, think for a minute about the simple plastic cup. Eight or 12 ounces, perhaps emblazoned with a Princeton logo — the University goes through thousands of them each month.
Effective Feb. 1, 2010, Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will assume the role of Director, Program in Environmental Studies (ENV) at Princeton Environmental Institute.
Since childhood, junior Jason Baum has been aware of environmental issues, switching off lights when leaving a room and turning off the water while brushing his teeth.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
Regarding his plans for the Oil, Energy and Middle East Initiative, teaching and research.
Baker is in residence at PEI for the fall 2009 semester. A native of Texas, she is Director, Well Planning and Geotechnical Operations at BP.
On June 1, 2009, PEI held it's 15th annual Class Day celebration.
A summary of the University's many campus sustainability initiatives.
Franz, a third year Ph.D. student was awarded a $10,000 grant to continue his research.
"Is Copenhagen the watershed or just another missed opportunity — there’s no way to tell yet," said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton University climate scientist who attended the talks. 
The question is a potential deal-killer: If nations ever agree to slash greenhouse gas emissions, how will the world know if they live up to their pledges?
Global warming in this century might raise sea levels more than expected in future centuries, says a study that looked at what happened at a time when Neanderthals roamed Europe.
An additional 2 degrees of global warming could commit the planet to 6 to 9 meters (20 to 30 feet) of long-term sea level rise.
How much good can this amount of aid do? How much would be enough if the industrialized nations can’t come to a climate change agreement? Should the United States throw in with this approach if it’s unlikely that Congress will approve any greenhouse gas reduction plan?
The climate problem is caused by prosperity.
Americans' day-to-day lives won't change noticeably if President Barack Obama achieves his newly announced goal of slashing carbon dioxide pollution by one-sixth in the next decade, experts say.
The online publication of sensitive e-mails and documents from a British climate centre is brewing into one of the scientific controversies of the year, causing dismay among affected institutes and individuals.
Engineering professor Winston (Wolé) Soboyejo discusses his camel solar refrigerator project, which may improve vaccine delivery in remote areas of Kenya and Ethiopia.
The cap-and-trade law that is solving the acid rain problem is a very rare species: an unmitigated public policy triumph.
Just months before world leaders are scheduled to meet to devise a new international treaty on climate change, a research team led by Princeton University scientists has developed a new way of dividing responsibility for carbon emissions among countries.
Christina Paxson, a Princeton faculty member since 1986 who is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Economics, has been selected as dean of the University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Her appointment is effective July 1.
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research.
The second round of initiatives seeking to improve sustainability on Princeton's campus have been funded under the auspices of the University's Sustainability Plan.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) will host a symposium and conference Wednesday through Friday, April 29-May 1, to address challenges related to agriculture and climate change as the global population expands.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.
You have to love nature, rising junior Stephanie Hill said, when you grow up, as she did, in a remote, pristine village on the shores of a glacier-fed lake in British Columbia.
President Shirley M. Tilghman comments on Princeton's focus on energy and the environment.
The University has approved two new undergraduate certificate programs for the 2008-09 academic year, one focusing on sustainable energy and another on global health and health policy.
In many ways, H. Vincent Poor, a 1977 graduate alumnus who became dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in June 2006, epitomizes Princeton's tradition of the teacher-scholar.
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Eleven Princeton faculty members have been involved in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 12.
Princeton faculty members have been invited to submit proposals by Monday, Sept. 17, for seed grants for projects under a new teaching and research program focused on important issues that share dominant environmental, political, social and engineering dimensions
David Wilcove, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs, has been named a recipient of the 2011 Pioneers of Science Award.
David Wilcove has been named a 2011 Pioneers of Science Award recipient by the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute (HWI).
China, India and Saudi Arabia are trying to secure their food supply by leasing water-rich African land. Doing so is cheaper and easier than using water resources back home, but it could backfire.