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In a research article published in Science, PEI Associated faculty member Ram Laxminarayan compares antibiotics to a natural resource that must be conserved, such as fisheries or oil.
Global use of antibiotics is surging according to Princeton University researchers who have conducted a broad assessment of antibiotic consumption around the world. The study, "Global Trends in Antibiotic Consumption, 2000-2010," found that worldwide antibiotic use has risen a staggering 36 percent over those 10 years, with five countries — Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS)— responsible for more than three-quarters of that surge, according to study auth
In the New York Times Ramanan Laxminarayan discusses the urgent need for a global agreement to manage antibiotic effectiveness as a global public good.
Ramanan Laxminarayan spearheads Lancet Infectious Diseases Commission report on global solution to antibiotic resistance including the impact on the environment.
Examining a case study of near-death experiences for six healthy men who volunteered to test an experimental drug in London has yielded important insights into potentially deadly over-reactions of the human immune system.
Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae is a serious danger to older hospitalized patients, with an estimated mortality rate as high as 40 percent. It has generally been treated with broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics. Another class of antibiotics, carbapenems, is used as an antibiotic of last resort for the most persistent infections.
In this study, we examine trends in the resistance of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates from acute care, long-term care, and outpatient settings across different US geographic regions. Using nationally representative surveillance data that encompass a longer time span and larger isolate count than has been used to date, we characterize the epidemiology of third-generation cephalosporin–resistant and carbapenem-resistant phenotypes of K. pneumoniae between 1999 and 2010. Results are stratified by
Through Princeton's Grand Challenges Initiative, Joao Biehl mentors undergraduates working on their senior theses in a variety of global and domestic settings.
Andy Dobson describes himself as genetically English, psychologically Scottish, and at home in an American habitat, where he has lived for the past 29 years.
A controversial program that uses the private market to provide affordable malaria treatments to people in Africa has dramatically increased access to care and should be continued, says Ramanan Laxminarayan.
The Health Grand Challenge (HC) is seeking proposals for innovative research and teaching initiatives that explore multidisciplinary aspects of global health and/or infectious disease.
Bacteria - including the MRSA superbug -may be more resistant to our most powerful antibiotics after a winter spurt of prescriptions, says a new study.
A new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online shows how seasonal changes in outpatient antibiotic use – retail sales of antibiotics typically get a boost during the winter – can significantly alter seasonal patterns of drug resistance.
Bonnie Bassler, the Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology, was inducted into the American Philosophical Society's biological sciences class.
Brittany Cesarini (right), a former Development Challenge intern, and Sandra Mukasa, will establish an organization in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to target violence and HIV/AIDS.
Survivors of Hurricane Katrina have struggled with poor mental health for years after the storm.
PEI is pleased to announce the appointment of Ramanan Laxminarayan to Research Scholar in the Princeton Environmental Institute.
The award is presented during Class Day to a senior whose activities while at Princeton best represent or exemplify the University's informal motto, "Princeton in the nation's service and in the service of all nations."
"The middle class ... in the U.S. and other industrialized nations spend money on things we do not need. We could instead donate that money to organizations that make a huge difference in the lives of the world's poorest people."
As more bacteria become resistant to the most powerful drugs in our arsenal, new weapons are getting harder and harder to find. Why we need to change the way we think about treating infection.
On Sept. 23, 2010, Michael Oppenheimer briefed the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, U.S. House of Representatives, on extreme weather in a warming world.
Tanzania's iconic national park must not be divided by a highway, say Andrew Dobson, Markus Borner, Tony Sinclair and 24 others. A route farther south would bring greater benefits to development and the environment.
It is summer in Princeton, and while the humidity and bees have arrived, nearly 100 Princeton undergraduates have left to begin summer internships through the PEI/Grand Challenges Internship Program.
Without aggressive action to reduce soot emissions, the time table for carbon dioxide emission reductions may need to be significantly accelerated in order to achieve international climate policy goals such as those set forth in last December's Copenhagen Accord.
Two PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellows, Ning Lin and Luke MacDonald, graduated in June 2010 with Ph.D.s from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in addition were awarded the Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
A Pakistani garbage dump seems like an unlikely place to find a solution to extreme poverty. But then again, the group of students from Princeton and Rutgers universities who plan to convert garbage into hope is an unlikely team.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
At PEI's class day in June, 44 students graduating with certificates in Environmental Studies gathered with faculty and family to celebrate.
Esmann will be recognized for co-founding Global Minimum, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) that has undertaken numerous projects in Sierra Leone aimed at combating the spread of malaria while promoting development in the country.
This has been one of PEI's most enterprising years. We are pleased to share our exciting news with faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends.
Sarah Chambliss ’10 and Josephine Walker ’10 named co-recipients of 2009 Becky Colvin Memorial Award.
Using ENV 307as a foundation.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
After the disaster the need skyrocketed, inspiring a team of Princeton researchers to launch a one-year effort to develop, deploy and test two novel disaster-relief technologies -- a rainwater harvester and filtration system, and a wind turbine for renewable energy production.
Princeton seniors James Bryant, Katie Hsih and Fatu Conteh have been awarded 2010 fellowships from ReachOut 56-81 to support yearlong public service projects after graduation.
The Officers of the James S. McDonnell Foundation today announced more than $14 million in grants in their ongoing program, the 21st Century Science Initiative
The Gulf region relies upon foreign sources for 60% of its food supply. Agriculture in this region is declining.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
When the more than 100 students completed internships this summer, they had at least one more commitment.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Americans' day-to-day lives won't change noticeably if President Barack Obama achieves his newly announced goal of slashing carbon dioxide pollution by one-sixth in the next decade, experts say.
On September 25, 2009, The Princeton Environmental Institute held its second annual Summer of Learning Symposium.
Engineering professor Winston (Wolé) Soboyejo discusses his camel solar refrigerator project, which may improve vaccine delivery in remote areas of Kenya and Ethiopia.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
The University has approved two new undergraduate certificate programs for the 2008-09 academic year, one focusing on sustainable energy and another on global health and health policy.
Several days into their spring break, 14 Princeton students found themselves in the middle of the Arizona desert, with nighttime temperatures in the 30s and no running water or electricity.
In many ways, H. Vincent Poor, a 1977 graduate alumnus who became dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in June 2006, epitomizes Princeton's tradition of the teacher-scholar.
A new report should spur public debate about how science and technology can best sustain the earth while furthering the goals of humanity, according to Robert Socolow, one of 18 maverick thinkers convened by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) to map the greatest technological challenges of this century.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.