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Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor, Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, and graduate student, Carole Dalin, are studying the delicate balance between trade in food and trade in water.
Four graduate students have been awarded 2012 PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellowships by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe who has been Princeton Environmental Institute faculty for thirteen years, is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
The University of Cantabria has announced the award of a Honorary Doctor's Degree to Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe.
Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, an environmental engineer and pioneer in the field of ecohydrology, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors in all areas of science.
Princeton's Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, will receive the 2009 William Bowie Medal, the highest honor awarded by the American Geophysical Union.
Kelly Caylor, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been awarded a Faculty Early Career Development award from the National Science Foundation.
Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams.
Ignacio Rodríguez-Iturbe, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been named a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
China, India and Saudi Arabia are trying to secure their food supply by leasing water-rich African land. Doing so is cheaper and easier than using water resources back home, but it could backfire.