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Princeton University researchers have uncovered a previously unknown, and possibly substantial, source of the greenhouse gas methane to the Earth's atmosphere.
The U.S. Department of Energy has selected a project led by Princeton University Professor Michael Celia for funding. The project is one of 13 chosen to develop technologies and methodologies for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Celia’s project, which is joint with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Heriot Watt University in Scotland, will develop new modeling capabilities for simulation of CO2 and brine migration in fractured reservoirs. Flow interacti
Four graduate students have been awarded 2012 PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellowships by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
This course is an introduction to the study of environmental systems. Students will use quantitative analysis to examine three of today's most pressing issues: energy, water, and food.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
Serving audiences across the ocean.
A summary of the University's many campus sustainability initiatives.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Franz, a third year Ph.D. student was awarded a $10,000 grant to continue his research.
Hoping to help fix the Earth's atmosphere, Catherine Peters recently found herself 4,100 feet underground.
For Trenton Franz, the one drawback to being a football star at the University of Wyoming -- he helped lead his team to its first bowl victory in 38 years -- was missing out on the chance to study abroad. His graduate work at Princeton has more than filled the gap. Working with civil engineering professors Michael Celia and Kelly Caylor, Franz studies the interactions among climate, water and vegetation in dryland ecosystems in central Kenya. By the time he earns his Ph.D., he will have spent
Eleven Princeton faculty members have been involved in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 12.