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Meet PEI Past Interns: 2009

Jack Ackerman, 2011, Politics Major

Jack

Internship:
Communications Intern at Regional Community Forest Training

Organization:
Regional Community Forest Training (RECOFTC), Bangkok, Thailand

"In this internship, I helped develop strategic communications materials for RECOFTC, an environmental non-profit based in Bangkok.  In developing these materials, I visited rural, community forestry villages where RECOFTC programs were active and interviewed local residents.  I compiled my research into brochures and into the organization's annual report.  My work also assisted in the production of a marketing video."


Hannah Barkley, 2011, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Major

Hanah Barkley

Internship:
Effects of Climate Change on Coral Reproduction and Recruitment

Organization:
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), Bermuda

Adviser:
Dr. Samantha de Putron,  BIOS

"This summer I worked in the de Putron Lab at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences studying the impacts of global warming, specifically ocean acidification and increased ocean temperature, on coral reproduction and recruitment. Previous studies have documented the repercussions on adult coral, namely decreased skeletal calcification and increased bleaching, but little research has been conducted on the effects on young coral. I also looked at whether the addition of nutrients could potentially offset the stress on the coral caused by these conditions."

"To do this, I collected adult corals from the reef and gathered the larvae they released. I then raised the young coral recruits under combinations of decreased pH, increased temperature, and elevated nutrient levels to determine what effect predicted climate change and nutrient supplementation might have on the viability of young coral.Although thorough analysis of coral growth and health under each condition is pending completion, this study has already shown that impending climate change will likely seriously endanger the success of coral recruits, which in turn threatens the long term survival of coral reefs." (See presentation.)


Alexander Brady, 2010, Comparative Literature Major

Alexander Brady

Internship:
The Importance of Native Species

Organization:
D&R Greenway Land Trust, Princeton, NJ

"This summer I worked mainly in the removal of invasive species from D&R Greenway's nature preserves. We targeted plants such as multiflora rose, purple loosestrife, and ailanthus (among many others) and employed various eradication methods, including cut-stump herbicide application, hack-and-drip herbicide application, and even the release of biocontrol beetles, in conjunction with the NJ department of agriculture. I worked alongside my two bosses, fellow intern, volunteer groups, and on one occasion helped to lead volunteers from a corporate group, as well as participated in actions under the auspices of the Central New Jersey invasive species strike team."

"Along with these main duties, I spent one to two days a week working in D&R Greenway’s Native Plant Nursery, where they grow NJ native plants in part of a comprehensive land rehabilitation strategy, re-planting natives in areas where invasives have been removed. I worked, as well, in a D&R Greenway park in Bordentown, and Trenton’s Cadwalader Park, removing invasives and landscaping for public use. In the final month of my internship, I created a website for the Native Plant Nursery in order to raise awareness about the importance of native plants as well as promote the biannual plant sales that the organization will be holding as a fundraiser."


Kelsey Brooks, 2011, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Major

Kelsey Brooks

Internship:
Using the Past to Preserve the Future–The Role of Archives in the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation

Organization:
National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC

Adviser:
Gary Krupnick, National Museum of Natural History

"The National Herbarium, housed at the National Museum of Natural History, contains approximately five million plant specimens. Currently, only a fraction of these specimens has been electronically catalogued, an important step in much of the research that is currently being done there. The project I worked on this summer was concerned with using the herbarium's collection, once digitized, to expedite the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation’s goal of having a preliminary conservation assessment for all plant species by 2010. To accomplish this, an algorithm was developed by my advisor and his colleagues that uses the historical data present in the herbarium to determine current species abundance. The number of specimens in the collection, along with when and where they were collected, is used to filter each species into one of three categories: not threatened, possibly threatened, or extinct. By creating these rough distinctions this approach has the potential to more efficiently determine which species may be at risk and require the attention of conservationists."

"My role in the project was to prepare the herbarium's collection of West Indian Poaceae for analysis by digitizing the relevant information. During my ten weeks at the museum I was able to catalogue approximately 3,500 specimens. While this was only a portion of the herbarium’s West Indian Poaceae and the digitization of the family will have to be completed before it can be used, I am pleased to have spent my summer positively contributing to an effort that may improve global plant conservation practices." (See presentation.)


Martina Car, 2010, Anthropology Major

Martina Car

Internship:
Provisioning Ecosystem Services in UNESCO Biosphere Reserves

Organization:
United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris, France

Adviser:
Alan Mann

"Ecosystem services play an important role in multiple aspects of human wellbeing from providing people with such vital materials as food and water, to producing a healthy physical environment and a place for good social relations, to helping people feel secure and promoting freedom of choice and action. Services, such as the capacity of the soil to purify water, the contribution of pollinators to angiosperm reproduction and crop yield, and the role that pristine natural landscapes play in cultural or religious traditions, have been considered free for centuries. Such a perception unfortunately permits the unregulated exploitation of many natural resources. Increasing pressures from human development require innovative solutions that promote the sustainable use of ecosystem services and the use of alternative sources of income for communities which depend on degraded services for their livelihood. UNESCO Biosphere Reserves, as “living laboratories” for sustainable development, are particularly suited to innovative ecosystem service management approaches."

"Unfortunately, biosphere reserve management committees and stakeholders are often not aware of ecosystem services or how to preserve them. My assignment as an intern for The Man and the Biosphere Program was to create a database of ecosystem service management approaches undertaken in biosphere reserves so far, as to ultimately create a collection of case studies that could provide valuable examples for biosphere reserve management worldwide. Through various methods of research, mainly reading publications, online documentation, and consulting experts in the field, I assembled case studies from across the world, with a particular focus on Payment for Ecosystem Service (PES) schemes. Pulling together detailed management-oriented examples from biosphere reserves that describe mechanisms for dialogue, stakeholders, payment mechanisms, costs and benefits, etc…, my project aimed to present very accessible guidelines to using ecosystem services in a holistic management approach in biosphere reserves,  so as to simultaneously preserve the environment and promote sustainable development." (See presentation.)


Raymond Brusca, 2011, Woodrow Wilson School Major

Raymond Brusca

Internship:
Field and Lab Research Technician in Environmental Science

Organization:
PEI, Princeton, NJ

Adviser:
Eileen Zerba

"My internship project focused on monitoring water quality and ecological balance across the University and within the surrounding Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed, especially Lake Carnegie.  Specifically, my project investigated how land use changes, driven by the Campus and Sustainability Master plans, will impact the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics, and, thereby health, of Lake Carnegie and the surrounding watershed, especially the Washington Road Stream."

"Particular emphasis was placed on determining the input point sources of fecal coliform bacteria such as E. coli by monitoring their levels at Carnegie Lake sites.  The project concluded with an EPA-set level of confidence that E. coli levels were unsafe for primary recreation activities such as swimming.  Another project involved investigating whether the variation of zooplankton across lake sites reflects the relative concentrations of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, and, thereby, the nutrient preferences of the phytoplankton upon which they subsist, which fall roughly but not uniformly around the Redfield ratio of 106 C:16 N:1 P."


Matthew Costa, 2011, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Major

Matthew Costa

Internship:
Lunar Periodicity and Reproductive Ecology of the Coral Porites Astreoides

Organization:
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), Bermuda

Adviser:
Dr. Samantha de Putron, BIOS

"I was one of two PEI interns in the lab of Dr. Samantha de Putron, a coral ecologist at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences.  I worked with Julia Lawson, a returning intern in the de Putron lab from Dalhousie University, on a project focused on the lunar timing of the reproduction of Porites astreoides, a reef-building coral native to Bermuda.  We collected adult colonies from two hand-picked sites, where the reef is exposed to very different light and sedimentation levels.  Over two lunar cycles in July and August, we observed the reproductive cycle of these colonies by counting the number of larvae released by each colony each night.  We sought to discover relationships between several variables and the lunar timing of release, including the size of the larvae, the size and growth rates of spat (the new coral polyps into which the larvae develop), and the density in the larvae of zooxanthellae (the photosynthesizing, single-celled symbionts that allow coral to derive energy from sunlight)."

"A major focus of our experiment was to study differences in the reproductive strategies of corals from reefs subjected to different sets of conditions, to gain insight into the potential for coral reefs to adapt to the increasingly changing ocean ecosystem.  Dr. de Putron plans on incorporating our results into a paper to be submitted for publication.  In addition to the chance to work on such a fascinating research topic, this internship has granted me the opportunity to explore the beautiful island of Bermuda, to learn to SCUBA dive, and to live and work in the unique and exciting intellectual community at BIOS." (See presentation.)


Justin Frick, 2010, English Major

Justin Frick

Internship:
A Green Summer in Princeton–Sustainability and Dining Services

Organization:
Dining Services, Princeton University

Adviser:
Stu Orefice, Dining Services

"My internship revolved around two main components. First, I tracked the sustainability of Dining Services purchases over the past year, in an effort to increase the amount of sustainable purchasing for the next year. In addition, I visited local farms that Dining Services receives food from, and created short videos, which will soon be up on the Dining Services website, in addition to a map showing all of the local providers Dining Services purchases from." (See presentation.)


Jessica Fu, 2012, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Major

Jessica Gu

Internship:
Detecting Human Fecal Pollution in Bermuda

Organization:
Bermuda Institute of Oceanic Sciences (BIOS), Bermuda

Adviser:
Rachel Parsons, Bermuda Institute of Oceanic Sciences

"My project is about using molecular methods to detect human fecal pollution in Bermuda's Coastal waters.  We use a human-specific primer for a PCR reaction that only amplifies DNA from a bacteria called Bacteroides Prevotella that lives in the human gut.  If this DNA is detected in water samples from around Bermuda, that indicates there is fecal pollution in the water from sewage outfalls or boreholes particularly contributed by human waste." (See presentation.)


Chloe Hall, 2011, Religion Major

Chloe Hall

Internship:
"Greening" Jishou–Summer of Service

Organization:
Princeton in Asia, China

Adviser:
Kai Evenson, Princeton in Asia

"Summer of Service is a program sponsored by Princeton in Asia that sends12 Princeton undergraduates to Jishou, a small city in Hunan Province, China. For six weeks every summer, Princeton students teach an intensive English immersion course to Chinese college students on the campus of Jishou Teacher's College. Most of our students are from the surrounding countryside, and almost all of them are studying to be English teachers. For many of the students, their Princeton teachers are the first native English speakers with whom they have had an opportunity to converse. This summer, with help from PEI, the teachers sponsored a "Jishou Earth Day", during which each class gave a presentation on the environment, ranging from local water pollution to art projects made of trash to songs about the environment (inspired by a lesson on Joni Mitchell's "Big Yellow Taxi")."

"On Earth Day, we also gave each student a tote bag made from recycled materials. In the classroom throughout the summer, the students also learned about environmental issues ranging from Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring" and the dawning of the American environmental movement to the dangers and benefits of ecotourism. Midway through the program, building on the work of Lisa Kelley (last year's SOS student leader), we administered an environmental survey that helped us learn more about our students' attitudes toward the environment in Jishou and China as a whole. Finally, we also offered a handful of students environmental scholarships that will allow them to carry out an environmentally-themed project in Jishou or their hometown during the coming months."


Justine E. Hausheer, 2010, English Major

Justine E. Hausheer

Internship:
Web-Based Solutions to Biodiversity: The Encyclopedia of Life

Organization:
Encyclopedia of Life, Washington, DC

"At the Encyclopedia of Life, I served as the Science Writing Intern. My main task was to draft articles about EOL for other publications. I also spent a significant amount of time working on our quarterly newsletter, EOLetter. I also maintained a media database, keeping track of each time Encyclopedia of Life was mentioned in a news publication anywhere in the world. Lastly, I performed general office tasks."

"At the Trust for Public Land, I worked for both the Center for Land and Water and the Center for City Park Excellence. For the Center for Land and Water, I drafted case study reports of our Greenprinting projects for brochures and other publications. I also drafted responses to RFP’s and RFQ’s for open space plans. Lastly, I researched upcoming projects and assessed their viability. For the Center for City Park Excellence, I conducted research on community gardening, and verified the accuracy of our recent Parks survey." (See presentation.)


Jessica Hsu, 2010, Civil and Engineering Major

Jessica Hsu

Internship:
Environmental Challenges and Sustainable Solutions for Protecting Water Resources

Organization:
PEI, Princeton University

Adviser:
Eileen Zerba

"The project focuses on improving water quality and ecological balance across the University and within an entire watershed, with its center, Lake Carnegie. Two central questions provide the framework for this project: First, how will land use changes, driven by the Campus and Sustainability Master plans, impact the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics, e.g. health, of 1) Lake Carnegie and the regional watershed; 2) natural habitats surrounding the lake; and 3) landscapes within campus? Second, how might this information influence the University’s implementation of sustainable practices and environmental policies, e.g. reduction in energy footprint, in the future?"

"The initial phases of this project will track the impact of three major campus sustainability initiatives on the health of Lake Carnegie: 1) restoration and extension of streams, 2) enhancement of forested and wetland areas, and 3) storm-water run-off and energy balance of Butler College green roofs. In the third phase of the project, sensors were installed in the green roofs. Temperatures readings of ground surfaces and roof surfaces across campus are compared to determine their contribution to the urban heat island effect."


Melissa Llardo, 2011, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Melissa Llardo

Internship:
Reef Sediment Microbiology

Organization:
University of Hawaii, Manoa, Hawaii

Adviser:
Eric Gaidos, University of Hawaii, Manoa

"This summer I was helping to continue the reef sediment microbiology research of Eric Gaidos at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. We collected samples of reef sediment at the Kaneohe bay on the Island of Oahu.  From these samples we were able to extract solutions containing microbial cell populations that we then ran through filters.  Using a process called FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) we were able to label specific microbes on filter sections with specific RNA probes and measure the number of each subset (for example Nitrosomonadales) compared to the relative number of cells on the filter.  Certain subsets participate in the nitrogen cycles in different ways, and we hoped to gather information about the nitrogen cycle in this particular bay based on how many cells of each population we observed. The results were inconclusive with a high margin of error, mostly due to the FISH process."


Lucile Jarry, 2012, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Major

Lucile Jarry

Internship:
Caribbean Environmental Health Institute

Organization:
Caribbean Environmental Health Institute, Saint Lucia

Adviser:
Luisa Silva-Duarte

"Tasks at the Caribbean Environmental Health Institute were varied: interns helped log information gathered by CEHI researchers via Access, assisted lab staff in routine testing of resort waters against recreational standards, summarized lengthy documents for online abstracts, and hiked the Fond d’Or watershed with St Lucia Forestry Department staff to locate sources of pollution. A common activity in both routine testing and field work in the watershed was water quality testing for pH, temperature, chlorine, dissolved oxygen, microbial contamination and other sources of pollution; the lab procedures were explained the first weeks of the internship, and reinforced in the field. Office work required some proficiency with the MS Office Suite (Word, Excel, Access) but also provided skills in database manipulation and in executive summary creation. Finally, the organization staff made it very easy to learn more about the culture and ecology of the island, including an overnight turtle-watching trip on the eastern coast and a day hike through the rainforest."


Joseph Jung, 2011, Sociology Major

Joseph Jung

Internship:
Gandhian Development

Organization:
Gandhian Development, India

"I composed a status report on social, economic, and environmental development in village called Bed, in rural Rajasthan. I made six trips to the field over seven weeks, interviewing NGO workers and local villagers through a translator about the status and impact of projects like communal pasture lands, water and soil conservation, womens empowerment, youth centers, and common village funds. I established relationships with some zonal workers and local villagers that allowed me to also ask about deeper social issues like the caste system. What resulted was a comprehensive overview of Bed village that will help the organization understand the area more and move on towards future development projects." (See presentation.)


Matthew Katz, 2011, Economics Major

Matthew Katz

Internship:
Junior Project Researcher

Organization:
Cusco, Peru

"My project revolved around establishing a baseline of our clientele with which we could base the progress of our educational programs on in the future. To establish this baseline, I oversaw a team of surveyors who worked out in the field performing hour long surveys. Also, I was in charge of putting together a method to digitize the communal bank and client information. With over 1200 banks in the Cusco region, the digitizing project was a big undertaking and involved a lot of collaborating and coordinating with others." (See presentation.)


Samuel Fox Krauss, 2010, Philosophy Major

Samuel Krauss

Internship:
Bioversity International, Magazine Intern

Organization:
Bioversity International, Rome, Italy

"I worked for Bioversity International, an international research and advocacy organization committed to agricultural biodiversity.  My job was content development and editing for the organization's yearly publication, Geneflow." (See presentation.)


David Kwabi, 2010, Mechanical Engineering Major

David Kwabi

Internship:
Harmonizing the Practice of Ocean Observation

Organization:
Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, Paris, France

"My internship was with the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) in Paris, France. I spent the first 3 weeks credentialing and ensuring a quorum of member state representatives at the GOOS and IOC general assemblies. I also assisted with writing the reports for both conferences. I spent the next 5 weeks learning PHP and SQL - web programming languages - and then reprogramming a pre-existing, but then defunct website that displayed member state representative contact information. I was able to dynamically link the website to a bank of IOC databases that held this information. The website also displayed the member states accorded to a color-coded scheme that reflected their IOC groupings. There is a need within the IOC for communication among member states that would be useful to policy-making, and rationalizing member state groupings, so hopefully, my work should go toward addressing these two objectives." (See presentation.)


Yuri Larrabee, 2011, Economics and Finance Major

Yuri Larrabee

Internship:
Land Stewardship Internship with D&R Greenway

Organization:
D&R Green Land Trust, Princeton, NJ

"During my internship this summer, I worked closely alongside the two land stewards at D&R Greenway, Central New Jersey's Land Trust. I assisted with the stewards' everyday activities, which mainly consisted of invasive non-native species removal, native plant nursery work, and conservation easement monitoring. During the last 3 weeks of the internship, I was given some time to work on an individual project. I designed a poster on some of the neotropic migratory birds of the Sourlands Mountain region in Central New Jersey. I gave information on 13 of these birds and constructed a post and frame so that hikers and walkers could learn about these birds while walking on one of D&R Greenway's properties."

"The whole internship experience was very rewarding and I learned much about land trusts' and stewards' integral role in land preservation and conservation. I also learned the importance of maintaining preserved land through stewardship activities in order to promote and preserve the biodiversity of both flora and fauna." (See presentation.)


Yuanbo Lio, 2010, Sociology Major

Yuanbo Liu

Internship:
Sustainable Fisheries Management, Trade and Agriculture Directorate

Organization:
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (COECD), Paris, France

"As a stagiaire of the Trade and Agriculture Directorate, Fisheries Division of the OECD, my responsibilities were to research and analyze the approaches and policies for rebuilding fishieres in Regional Management Fisheries Organizations, to draft a shapter on Regional Fisheries Management Organziation for OECD publication, for an inventory of national and international approaches to fisheries rebuilding, and research and develop case studies of fisheries rebuildling plans, including those in developing countries. I created documents, compiling information as the basis for such analysis and for circulation to contacts in the Regional Management Fisheries Organzations for validation and completion, and researched suggestions made by consultants and made recommendations based on my research. I also reviewed options for European Union and United States case studies and developed those as well."


Henry Loevner, 2011, Politics Major

Henry Loevner

Internship:
Friends of Princeton Open Space Nature Preserve Stewardship

Organization:
Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands, Princeton, NJ

Adviser:
Stephen Hiltner, Friends of Princeton Open Space

"I worked to maintain biodiversity within the preserve.  My chief responsibility was to eliminate populations of invasive herbaceous species.  Mr. Hiltner and I also cultivated native plants in the Mountain Lakes greenhouse to be planted in the field."


Josh T. Muketha, 2010, Civil and Environmental Engineering Major

Josh Muketha

Internship:
The Use of Agrobiodiversity to Manage Climate Change – Charting Experiences from Rural Communities and Indigenous Peoples

Organization:
Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research Rome, Italy

"As stipulated in the terms of reference, my primary task during the course of the internship was, by making use of a variety of resources, gather and organize information related to agrobiodiversity as a provider of adaptation and mitigation strategies available to rural communities for meeting the challenges by global climate change. This was an activity of the Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research. As part of the Platform, I accomplished the following:"

  • Created an online database of agrobiodiversity-based strategies employed by indigenous and rural communities in adapting to climate change.
  • Actively participated in the management of the Platform’s blog and other discussion forums, encouraging dialogue among the Platform’s members and other stakeholders.
  • Compiled a technical report for the International Workshop held by the Platform in Chiang Mai, Thailand on the use of agrobiodiversity by indigenous communities in adapting to climate change.
  • Assisted in the creation of and contributed to a briefing paper for presentation by the Platform at the UNFCCC Bangkok Climate Change talks.


Brooke Peterson, 2010, Woodrow Wilson School Major

Brooke Peterson

Internship:
Intern to International Rivers' Mekong River Campaign

Organization:
International Rivers, Bangkok, Thailand

Adviser:
Burton Singer

"International Rivers has led the way in using research, education, and advocacy to address the many ways river development projects harm the environment: their successes include leading the creation of the World Commission on Dams, initiating the International Day of Action for Rivers, and protecting communities in countries as diverse as Brazil, Lesotho and Nepal. My work with International Rivers focused on investigating how water development projects -- specifically the dams proposed to be built on the Mekong River -- will have negative consequences for the environment and human health. Living in Bangkok, Thailand, I devoted most of my internship to piecing together how building the dams will block fish migrations and thus eliminate an estimated 62% of the Mekong river’s fish trade. Since the Mekong River is currently the most productive inland fishery in the world, this drastic reduction in fish would increase malnutrition and harm regional food security."

"My work concerning the importance of an undammed Mekong River to regional food security, and thus human health, will be visible in two ways. First, the Mekong Program on Water Environment and Resilience (M-POWER) is funding a documentary to raise awareness about how the Mekong River is important to human nutrition throughout the Lower Mekong Basin; the literature review I compiled for the film crew will be important in determining the most valuable scenes to film and facts to present. Second, I wrote an eight-page briefing sheet concerning how the Mekong dams will affect the nutritional status of millions of people; this will be published by International Rivers in November and distributed to government officials, locally active NGOs, and concerned lay people. Hopefully the documentary and briefing sheet will draw attention and action to these important issues I spent my internship researching."


Darcie Ryan, 2010, Geosciences Major

Darcie Ryan

Internship:
Trichodesmium Response to Climate Change

Organization:
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), Bermuda

Adviser:
Francois Morel

"I investigated the effects of ocean acidification on trichodesmium, a diazotrophic cyanobacteria that lives in the subtropical and tropical Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans. Because they fix nitrogen and contribute to the ocean carbon pump, the future heartiness and behavior of Trichodesmium as average surface ocean acidity increases are important environmental variables."

"With assistance from Professors Francois Morel and Mike Lomas, and Princeton graduate student Dalin Shi, I collected Trichodesmium thiebautii field samples from the North Atlantic Ocean.  Bacterial colonies then incubated in three discrete pH levels: 8.1 (contemporary average surface ocean pH), 7.8 (estimated pH for 2100), and 8.4 (pre-industrial scenario).  The experiment was repeated throughout June, July, and August.  After incubation, samples were analyzed for particulate nitrogen, particulate carbon, particulate phosphate, nitrogen fixation rate, carbon fixation rate, and chlorophyll a concentration per colony." (See presentation.)


Erin Sherman, 2011, Psychology Major

Erin Sherman

Internship:
Political Climate–Watching Stakeholders Watching Waxman

Organization:
House of Representatives, Washington, DC

"The intern followed climate legislation though the House of Representatives and Senate, attending relevant hearings and meetings around the Capitol. She prepared several memoranda on such meetings, including collaborative projects with other research fellows and a capstone memorandum on the past, present, and plausible future scientific, policy, and political issue of emissions from land use change induced by biofuel production." (See presentation.)


Eric Stern, 2011, Woodrow Wilson School Major

Eric Stern

Internship:
Outreach Intern at the New York League of Conservation Voters (NYLCV)

Organization:
New York League of Conservation Voters, New York, NY

"As the NYLCV outreach intern, I was given tremendous responsibility in developing and implementing the organization's summer outreach plan. I used my familiarity with NYC politics and demographics to help the organization with their goal of making environmental protection a top priority with elected officials, decision-makers and voters by evaluating incumbent performance and endorsing and electing environmental leaders to office in New York State. When looking to increase our volunteer base in the north Bronx, I traveled to a science high school in the district and spoke to students in an environmental justice class. When trying to increase our membership base, I coordinated tabling events at greenmarkets, parks and the annual Heritage of Pride Festival."

"When looking for potential new donors, I ran an outreach table at an event for affluent young professionals on the upper west side of Manhattan. When touting our scorecard that objectively rated the environmental records of NY City Council members, I tabled at the gates of City Hall Park to ensure that politicians could see that they were accountable for their votes. No matter the outreach objective, the responsibility for implementation laid with me. As the point person on outreach, it was my task to ensure we had sufficient volunteers and supplies for each initiative. In addition to coordinating the outreach effort, I also engaged in editorial writing, blogging, phonebanking, preparing talking points for media events, writing candidate environmental profiles and editing publications. In summary, interning with the NYLCV was an excellent experience." (See presentation.)


Kit Thayer, 2011, History Major

Kit Thayer

Internship:
A Communications Conundrum: China, the Environment and the Media

Organization:
Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Beijing, China

Adviser:
Kai Evenson, PIA

"NRDC is a leading environmental NGO which has been working in China for the past decade. The internship involves working with the Communications team of NRDC's Beijing office, working to increase awareness of media coverage of the NGO and helping organize public relations events." (See presentation.)


Kathleen Wade, 2011, Woodrow Wilson School Major

Kathleen Wade

Internship:
Urban Sustainability in Developing India

Organization:
Parisar, Pune, India

"This summer, I worked with a local non-profit organization, Parisar, on sustainable development as it relates to transportation policy in Pune, India. Along with a college-age Indian intern, I directed the 'Cycle for Pune' program, which aims to raise awareness about urban development strategies and the role bicycling can play in bringing about a more livable, developed city. We facilitated, and then presented workshops about Pune's current development trajectory to 7th-10th grade students in Pune schools. Afterwards, the students and principals sent a form letter and petition to the local government asking for better bicycling infrastructure so that students can cycle to school safely."

"In five weeks, we gave eight workshops at six schools, reaching 1300 children and collecting 2500 surveys from students and parents about cycling in the city. I also did considerable work systematizing Parisar's methods of operation. I designed and managed new forms and a spreadsheet for organizing information about participating schools, updated our surveys, and devised a system for recording and evaluating our workshops throughout the summer. My co-worker and I also completed a manual documenting our procedures so that new interns can successfully continue the 'Cycle for Pune' program during the fall." (See presentation.)


Chenyu Zheng, 2012, Economics Major

Chenyu Zheng

Internship:
From Earth's Hope to TEDxPedition

Organization:
Environmental Education Media Project for China (EEMP), Beijing, China

Advisers:
Michael Collins '07 and Leon Chen

"I interned in Beijing first as a Communications intern at Environmental Education Media Project for China (EEMP) for three weeks. But due to the organization's obligation to go to Mongolia for a World Bank film on energy sector, I got transferred to work as the Director of TEDxPedition, a countrywide expedition(Sept. 4th to 20th) with multiple regional conferences under the official license of TED). While at Earth's Hope, my responsibilities included researching and writing letters to potential sponsors for a new film Earth's Hope, compiling film distributor list, publicizing EEMP documentaries in Ghana, preparing for EEMP's North Korea trip to promote sustainable building as well as translating sponsor letters and key documents into Chinese."

"These tasks have given me a good scope into a start-up NGO and allowed me to  better understand the urgency and challenges in communicating sustainability in China and around the World. In the later phase of my internship, I assisted Leon Chen of Oxford to organize TEDxPedition in China, including four conferences in Beijing, Xi'an, Chengdu and Beijing. This green expedition involves visits to sustainable initiatives and case studies around China, such as the Loess Plateau Rehabilitation Project(also the main work of EEMP) and green business giant, Broad Airconditioning in Changsha. Our expedition goes across 9 provinces and extends over 2000 miles."

"In addition, the conferences focus on climate change, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. In Beijing, our conference themed around climate change: its challenges, solutions and opportunities. We engaged speakers such as Maurice Strong, former UN vice secretary and founder of UNEP and attracted participants from top universities in China and abroad. Organizing this event has showed a different yet effective way to communicate sustainability and to engage young minds to discuss and care about environmental problems."