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Oppenheimer and Vecchi to speak on the new IPCC Report on Nov. 20

Michael Oppenheimer, Albert G. Milbank Professor Geosciences and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School; and the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University; and Gabriel Vecchi, research oceanographer and head of the Climate Variations and Predictability Group at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, will speak on “Putting the New IPCC Report in Context,” on Wednesday, November 20, 2013, at 4:30 p.m., in Bowl 1 Robertson Hall, at Princeton University.

The report, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group I Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC WGI AR5) provides a view of the current state of scientific knowledge relevant to climate change.

The seminar is presented by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies’ (PIIRS) research community on Communicating Uncertainty: Science, Institutions, and Ethics in the Politics of Global Climate Change and is open to the public. Media wishing to attend should contact Kathleen Allen (or by phone, 609.258.5978) by November 19th.**

Oppenheimer is also director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (STEP) at the Woodrow Wilson School. His research interests include science and policy of the atmosphere, particularly climate change and its impacts. Much of Oppenheimer’s research aims to understand the potential for dangerous outcomes of increasing levels of greenhouse gases by exploring the effects of global warming on ecosystems such as coral reefs, on the ice sheets and sea level, and on patterns of human migration. He also studies the process of scientific learning and scientific assessments and their role in problems of global change. Ph.D. University of Chicago.

Vecchi’s research focuses on the interactions between the atmosphere and oceans on timescales from weeks to centuries, including the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon and the Asian-Australian monsoon.  Vecchi’s recent efforts concentrate on predicting short- and long-term changes to tropical circulation and variability, including characterizing the impact of climate change on tropical cyclones and hurricanes, and global patterns of rainfall and drought.  Ph.D. University of Washington.

The research community on Communicating Uncertainty: Science, Institutions, and Ethics in the Politics of Global Climate Change, is codirected by Marc Fleurbaey, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Public Affairs and the University Center for Human Values; Robert Keohane, professor of international affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Melissa Lane, professor of politics and director of the Program in Values and Public Life; Michael Oppenheimer, Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Stephen Pacala, Fredrick D. Petrie Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, director of the Princeton Environmental Institute, and co-principal investigator of the Carbon Mitigation Initiative; Harold Shapiro, president emeritus of Princeton University, and professor of economics and public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; and Robert Socolow is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and co-principal investigator of the Carbon Mitigation Initiative.

 

For more information contact Kathleen Allen, kballen@princeton.edu or 609-258-5978.