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Course Offerings

Spring 2013-2014

Click on the course title to visit the course page on the Registrar's site.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES

LAS 403/COM 429/POR 410
Latin American Studies Seminar - Anthropophagy, Literature and Culture: Lyrics of Exile in Brazil and Beyond
How to account for the omnipresence of the metaphor of "anthropophagy" in Brazilian cultural history? Indeed, the first descriptions of European colonizers already invented the link between the New World and anthropophagous rituals. Therefore, the rediscoveries of the theme in literature, cinema, music and the arts have strategically undertaken a double re-reading of both the notion of "anthropophagy" and the colonial reports. In this course, the concept of "lyrics of exile" will be proposed as a new framework to understand the centrality of the "other" in the determination of the "self"- the very core of cultural cannibalism. Prerequisites/Restrictions: Proficiency in Portuguese and Spanish required (reading and writing). Other information: Class will be taught in Portuguese; discussion will be held in Portuguese, Spanish or English. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.
João Cezar de Castro Rocha. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th.

LAS 405
Latin American Studies Seminar - Economics of Latin American Populations
This course will explore topics regarding "everyday life" from an economic perspective. Topics revolve around human behavior that arises at different ages and demographics from the perspective of Latin American cultural and institutional backgrounds. We study decisions of parents to have children and to "invest" in them, decisions of adolescents to use drugs and take other risks, the decision to marry (or not), and issues related to investing (or not) in one's health. We shall explore how economists think about, theorize and analyze these questions of great importance to Latin American populations from an economic perspective. Prerequisites/Restrictions: The course will be taught in English. Other information: Several different pedagogical methods are used in the course. Classroom time is focused on papers and readings on specific topics. Students will be asked questions about what they have read and how they might extend or apply these ideas and/or findings, what their implications for understanding behavior are, and what implications they might have for public policy. Students will be expected to have read the assigned papers before class and to participate in the classroom discussion.
Marcos De Almeida Rangel. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm M.

LAS 406

Latin American Studies Seminar - The Aztecs: An Introduction
An introduction to Aztec Civilization before and after the Conquest. Topics to be explored include mestizaje, transculturation, and the destiny of these people in a globalized world (the Iberian Empire extended from Africa to Asia). Special focus on images and visual culture. Prerequisites/Restrictions: The course will be taught in English.
Serge M. Gruzinski. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T.

LAS 502/SPA 591/COM 502

Latin America's Colonial History: A Global Perspective
A fresh look at Latin America's colonial period under the new lens of global history. We will use the theories of Chakrabarti, Sloterdijk and others to understand the global flows linking Medieval Europe, the Americas, and other parts of the world. How was history written in the 16th century? How did Europeans arrive at an understanding of non-Christian traditions? Prerequisites/Restrictions: The course will be taught in Spanish.
Serge M. Gruzinski. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W.


CROSS-LISTED COURSES

AAS 331/LAS 333
Race, Nation and the Citizen in Latin America
This seminar course traces the tide of racial discourse and Enlightenment-spurred scientific empiricism and explores the materialization of these anxieties in popular culture as it related to the development of notions of race and nationalizing projects at the dawn of independence in Latin America. Other Requirements: Not open to Freshmen.
Danielle L. Terrazas Williams. S01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm M W.

AAS 428/ENG 428/LAS 429

Latina/o Performance
This interdisciplinary seminar examines U.S. Latina/o performance from the 1960s to the present. Students will engage the creative traditions that have emerged from the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, the post-colonial aesthetic concerns shaped by Caribbean migration, and the social preoccupations that have defined urban and suburban life. The class will learn to put formal motifs in conversation with a set of conceptual terms, including mestisaje, borderlands, transculturation, choteo, and disidentification. We will alternate between plays, critical readings, live performances, videos, and music. Other Requirements: United States Travel Required. Other information: Students are expected to examine all outside course materials (videos, recordings, etc.) as indicated by the syllabus. Field trips are mandatory. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Alexandra T. Vasquez S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T.

ANT 229/LAS 229
Anthropology In and Of the City
This course will introduce you to urban anthropology. Urban anthropologists study everything from squatter settlements to the gleaming institutions of global capitalism on Wall Street. What does it mean to "make do" in global cities? How do those experiences shape our understanding of plurality? How do we talk about urban violence without pathologizing cities and the poor? We will explore the city as a stage upon which social, economic, and political struggles are waged, and examine the walls, fences, and security cameras that inscribe social exclusion onto the urban built environment, producing fortified enclaves and zones of abandonment. Other Information: [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Susan Ellison. L01 10:00 am - 10:50 am T Th; P99 TBA.

ART 268/LAS 268

Introduction to Mesoamerican Material Culture
This course explores the art and archaeology of Mesoamerica, including the cultures and regions of the Olmec, West Mexico, Teotihuacan, Oaxaca, Maya, and Aztec. From temple pyramids and carved stone monuments located in plaza centers to the broken ceramic sherds and stone tools found in household trash deposits, material culture comprises one of the basic resources archaeologists examine to understand past ways of life. The course will explore the inferences scholars make in the analysis of material remains as well as the ways in which material culture was integral to the making of ancient political, economic, religious, and social systems. Other information: For department concentrators, satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement.
Christina T. Halperin. L01 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm M W; P01 11:00 am - 11:50 am W; P02 3:30 pm - 4:20 pm W

ART 394/LAS 394

Pre-Columbian Maya Art: Elite and Popular Discourses
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED. This course examines Pre-Columbian Maya art and archaeology from the perspective of intersecting aesthetic, ritual, and social traditions: official state art and popular representations and practices. Drawing on critical social theory as a basis for our analyses, we will examine the relationship between royal mural paintings and cave art, patronized art and graffiti, large-scale stone monuments and small-scale figurines, "readable" hieroglyphic texts and pseudo writing, and civic-ceremonial architecture and vernacular household architecture. Other Requirements: Not open to Freshmen. Prerequisites and Restrictions: The course will include a study trip to Guatemala to visit world-renown archaeological sites, national museums, and archaeological storage collections not available to the general public. Other Information: For department concentrators, satisfies African/Pre-Columbian distribution requirement. To fill out the application for this course go to the Dept. of Art and Archaeology website: http://www.princeton.edu/artandarchaeology/undergrad/ART394LAS394Application11.pdf. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Christina T. Halperin. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm M

COM 582/LAS 582/SPA 590

1968 and the Present: Arts and Politics of Change in Latin America
This course looks at the different ways in which intellectual and artistic work is reinvented as it engages in practices of intense change at moments of political and economic crisis. Focusing on key moments since 1968, we will study how social, cultural, and artistic movements reconfigure a sense of the political that visualizes its expressions in other forms of life, proposing innovative ways of approaching the role of knowledge and affects in contemporary societies. Readings include Althusser, Arguedas, Bolaño, Colectivo Situaciones, Fernanda Navarro, Rancière, Revueltas, Kristin Ross.
Susana Draper. S01 4:30 pm - 7:20 pm W

EEB 332/LAS 350

Pre-Columbian Peoples of Tropical America and Their Environments
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
The pre-European history of Amerind cultures and their associated environments in the New World tropics will be studied. Topics to be covered include the peopling of tropical America; development of hunting/gathering and agricultural economies; neotropical climate and vegetation history; and the art, symbolism, and social organization of native Americans. Field and laboratory experiences will incorporate methods and problems in field archaeology, paleoenthnobotany and paleoecology, and archaeozoology. Other Requirements: International Travel Required. Prerequisites and Restrictions: Prerequisites: 211, and 321 and enrollment in the EEB Spring Semester in tropical ecology program in Panama.
Ilean Isel Isaza Aizpurúa and Dolores R. Piperno. L01 TBA; B99 TBA

EEB 338/LAS 351

Tropical Biology
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
"Tropical Biology" is an intensive, three-week field course given at four sites in Panama, examining the origins, maintenance and major interactions among terrestrial plants and animals. The course provides the opportunity to appreciate (1) floral and faunal turnover among four rainforest sites (beta-diversity); and (2) floral and faunal turnover along vertical gradients, from ground to upper canopy, at two rainforest sites (vertical stratification). Students carry out individual projects at the sites. Fieldwork is supported by six orientation walks that introduce participants to common orders and families of plants and arthropods. Other Requirements: International Travel Required; open to Juniors Only. Prerequisites and Restrictions: EEB 321 and enrollment in the EEB Spring semester tropical biology program in Panama.
Yves F. Basset. L01 TBA; B99 TBA

LAO 200/SOC 341/LAS 336

Latinos in American Life and Culture
This course will consider how Latinos are transforming the United States socially, politically, and culturally even as they themselves change in the process. Topics to be examined include the social and cultural significance of "Latino" or "Hispanic" as an ethnic or racial category, how Latinos fit into the American social system, ethnic and cultural identities, their educational and health outcomes, the implications of the unprecedented geographic dispersal of Latinos, and their growing contribution and impact on mainstream and other types of culture including music, literature, and language. Other information: Active participation in precept is expected. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Edward E. Telles. L01 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm M W; P01 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm M; P02 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm W

POL 333/
LAO 333/LAS 333/SOC 325
Latino Politics in the U.S.
What is Latino politics and is it different from American politics? What do we know about Latino voting and attitudes in U.S. elections? How do policies and institutions impact Latinos, and how are policies and institutions impacted by them? What methods can we use to find out? In this course we will use social science to examine questions about Latino politics in the U.S. Topics include: party identification and policy preferences; patterns of political participation; ethnic and national identity; immigration, demographics and their political impact; Latino subgroup differences such as generation, national origin and religious affiliation. Prerequisites and Restrictions: No prior knowledge of the topic is required, but familiarity with the basics of American politics and scientific inquiry will be very helpful. Other information: Open to all students but ideal for sophomores and juniors interested in developing a research proposal on the course topic(s) that can later be used as the starting point for a junior paper or senior thesis project. Students will have the option of a final research proposal OR final paper in response to a prompt. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Ali A. Valenzuela. L01 3:30 pm - 4:20 pm M W; P99 TBA

POR 319/
LAS 319/VIS 346
Brazilian Cinema
An introduction to the richness of Brazilian film, this course explores major cinematic movements: from the Cinema Novo, to critically acclaimed documentaries and more recent commercial successes like 'City of God'. Recurrent and emerging trends will be discussed (e.g. the destruction of the Amazon, urban violence, literary adaptation, musical expressions).
Bruno M. Carvalho. C01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W; F01 7:30 pm - 10:20 pm

SOC 310/LAS 310/GSS 312
Gender and Development in the Americas
This course examines gender as an integral component of socio-economic development in the United States and areas of Latin America. We give attention to processes of industrial restructuring on a global scale that have increased the participation of women in the labor force and transformed men's employment alternatives. The relationship between gender inequality and social order is a central focus. We give special attention to liberal and Marxian approaches in economics. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Ana M. Goldani. L01 7:30 pm - 8:20 pm; M W; P99 TBA

SPA 212/LAS 213

Religious Practices in the Hispanic World
This course surveys the practice of beliefs in Spain, Latin America, and in Hispanic communities in the United States. It explores how "Catholic" folk piety was established and developed in Spain and what happened to it when it transferred to the New World. By surveying the diverse configurations of religious practices through written texts and visual media, it inquires how identity and social relationships define a person's relation to the divine. Emphasis will be given to the development of spoken and written proficiency in Spanish. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 200-level course or instructor's permission. Other information: Course taught in Spanish. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Christina H. Lee. C01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm T Th

SPA 319/LAS 325

Topics in Cinema and Culture - Latin American Film - Poetics and Politics of the Third World
An exploration of a series of critically acclaimed contemporary Latin American films, accompanied by readings that provide a theoretical and historical framework for its analysis. Topics to be discussed, among others: subalternity and the Third World; sexual and racial politics; postcolonial poetics; genocide; cultural hybridism and
mestizaje; dictatorship and populism; biopolitical fantasies. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 207 or higher, or instructor's permission. Other information: Course taught in Spanish.
Javier E. Guerrero. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th; F01 7:30 pm - 10:20 pm T

SPA 345/LAS 345

Topics in Latin American Literature and Ideology: Poetry, Translation, and Border in the Hispanic Caribbean
This course explores the history of Cuban, Dominican and Puerto Rican poetry, focusing on the translations and dialogues between the Caribbean and North American poets. We are interested in reading the conversations that the poets of both Americas have made in the last two centuries. By working with this poetry, the course analyzes different modes of figuring the border as well as the images that these poets used in order to identify their own cultures. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 200-level course or instructor's permission. Other information: Course taught in Spanish.
Rafael Elías Rojas Gutiérrez. S01 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm MW

SPA 356/LAS 365

Roberto Bolaño: Adventures in Cultureland
Forty years after the emergence of Gabriel García Márquez, the narrative works of the Chilean Roberto Bolaño have once again put Latin American literature at the center of the world's cultural mainstream. Quiet poet, public storyteller, and heir of Borges' most intricate speculations and the beatniks' nomadism, Bolaño broke with the recipes of magical realism and opened a fresh literary horizon by combining anti-intellecutal vitalism and erudite conceptualism. This course explores the artistic strategies of an author who made Jim Morrison dialogue with James Joyce, and went from being an anonymous eccentric to a New York Times bestseller. Other Requirements: Not Open to Freshmen. Prerequisites and Restrictions: At least one LA distribution area course in Spanish. Other information: Course will be taught in Spanish.
Susana Draper . C01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T

SPA 361/LAS 362/GSS 364

Perilous Desires: Witches, Saints, and Sinners
This course focuses on representations of women's bodies and sexualities in early Latin American writings. In doing so, we will study the body through a variety of lenses: the anatomical body as a site of construction of sexual difference, the witch's body as a site of sexual excess, the mystic's body as a double of the possessed body, the tortured body as a site of knowledge production, and the racialized bodies of New World women as sites to govern sexuality, spirituality, labor, and property in the reaches of the Spanish Empire. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 200-level course. Other information: Course taught in Spanish.
Larissa Brewer-Garcia. C01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm M W


COURSES OF INTEREST

ECS 321/SPA 333/COM 389
Cultural Systems - Proust, Freud, Borges
An overview of three of the most influential writers in the twentieth century. All three were fascinated by similar topics: dreams and memory; sexuality; Judaism. All three lived during traumatic historical periods (Proust during WWI; Freud during WWII; and Borges during Peronismo). Discussion will focus on theories of writing, modernity, modernist aesthetics, the conception of spaces and the construction of sexual identity. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Rubén Gallo. L01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm M; P01 3:30 pm - 4:20 pm M; P02 7:30 pm - 8:20 pm M; P03 7:30 pm - 8:20 pm W

FRS 102

The Body under Suspicion - Latin American Visual Culture and the 20th Century
Barrett Family Freshman Seminar
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
The French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy argues that we do not have bodies, we are bodies. The subject is mere exteriority, infinite exposition: the body emptying itself outward. This exteriority, however, regularly metamorphorses itself, submerging within and taking on allegories; at other times it calls attention to itself as matter. This seminar explores the diverse representations of the body in Latin America from a visual culture perspective. To this end, it proposes examining different bodies, both canonical and marginalized, in direct relationship to their class, race, and sexuality. We will look at visual representations (films, performances, exhibitions), as well as literary texts. The goals of the course include: an interrogation of these bodies that does not take the binary opposition of sex as fixed; questioning their mobility and matter; and revealing the metaphors at work within them. Readings and films may be complemented by visits from artists, filmmakers, and cutting-edge scholars. Throughout the semester, students will have the opportunity to interact with artists working in different genres and to witness their working process. The seminar will be taught entirely in Spanish, while readings will be in Spanish and English. Other Requirements: Open to Freshmen Only. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Javier Guerrero. S01 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm M W

FRS 162

Pottery: Archaeology, Art, and Technology
Barrett Family Freshman Seminar
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
Pottery sits at the intersection of art and technology, simultaneously part of aesthetic systems and complex tools requiring specialized knowledge of their production. This course explores archaeological approaches to pottery through a survey of different prehistoric pottery traditions, including some of the earliest pottery produced over 22,000 years ago, Attic pottery from ancient Greece, ceramic portrait heads from the Peruvian Andes, finely painted polychrome vases of the Classic period Maya, and highly burnished, coil-made pottery of the ancient Olmec. Part of the course will take place in the Princeton University Art Museum where students will get an opportunity to handle and closely examine some of the museum's ancient pottery collections. Another part of the course will involve replication and experimental studies of pottery production (e.g., clay preparation, ceramic forming, and open-pit firing) in which students will test their own questions about the social, artistic, and technological milieus of ancient cultures. In learning different stylistic, typological, modal, iconographic, experimental, mineral, and chemical approaches to pottery, students will investigate how technological studies of pottery illuminate new avenues for understanding aesthetic systems and how aesthetic systems emerge from the materiality of pottery. Other Requirements: Open to Freshmen Only. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Christina T. Halperin . S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th

HIS 504

Colonial Latin America to 1810
An introduction to the scholarship on Latin America's colonial past, ranging from "central" areas in Mexico and the Andes to "marginal" regions. New concepts and topics have emerged. What are these new trends and what do they mean? Why do some types of questions now seem more urgent than others? To explore these questions and find out what problems of past historiographical traditions remain unsolved and deserve a new look, both classic texts and more recent works that display new approaches will be read, often in counterpoint. Other Requirements: Not Open to Freshmen. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Vera S. Candiani. S01 TBA

POR 562/COM 586/AAS 564
Luso-Brazilian Seminar - Rethinking the Enlightenment
What are the legacies of the Enlightenment? How do 18th-century developments resurface, or are resignified, in later debates? In this course we study major events, texts, and turning points of the period, as well as their repercussions or reception in the 20th and 21st centuries. With the Luso-Brazilian world at its center, the seminar focuses on three interrelated and overarching themes: transatlantic circulation of knowledge; slavery and the emerging science of race; literature (esp. poetry) and urban imaginaries. Other Requirements: Not Open to Freshmen. Other information: This interdisciplinary course seeks to be both comparative and connective. Focus is placed on attempts to insert a 'Luso-Brazilian Enlightenment' within a broader global context, with special attention to France, the United States, and the African diaspora. Discussions may be held in Portuguese, Spanish, and/or English, to be decided with students on the first day of class.
Bruno M. Carvalho. S01 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm T

POL 430

Seminar in Comparative Politics - Military, State and Society
This seminar is concerned with the puzzles and problems of civil-military relations. What role does the professional military play in modern state and society? Are professional militaries more or less likely to intervene in politics? How do democracies control the military? Why do those with guns obey those without them? We will explore these and other important questions in the study of civil-military relations across a variety of political contexts: consolidated democracies, transitional democracies, and authoritarian regimes in different regions of the world, including the U.S., Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and South Asia. Other Requirements: Not Open to Freshmen. Prerequisites and Restrictions: At least one Politics course in comparative or international relations is highly recommended. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Aqil Shah. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm M

POR 208

Journeys in Portuguese: Studies in Language and Culture
Designed as a journey through the Lusophone world this course seeks to present the Portuguese language in context by exploring historical, social, political and cultural aspects of Brasil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa through the media, literature, film, music and other realia. Students will increase their fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken Portuguese, broadening their vocabulary and mastery of syntax through textual analysis, discussions, oral presentations and grammar review. An advanced language course and overview of the Lusophone world, POR 208 seeks to prepare students for further study of literature and culture. Prerequisites and Restrictions: POR 109 or instructor's permission. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Brazilian topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Nicola T. Cooney. C01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm T Th

REL 505

Studies in the Religions of the Americas - Religion, Race, & Gender in Latin America
This course explores the intersections of religion, race, and gender in the history and historiography of Latin America. It consists of three chronological units looking at: the formative and "baroque" eras of the colonial period, (1500-1720); late colonial Bourbon reforms through the early national period, (1750-1865); and the triumph of liberalism through the first half of the 20th century, (1870-1950). Seminar participants choose to write either a historiographic paper focusing on the scholarly literature surrounding a particular theme, topic, or time period or a research paper. Other Requirements: Open to Graduate Students Only.
Jessica Delgado. S01 10:00 am - 1:00 pm W

SOC 340/REL 390

God of Many Faces: Comparative Perspectives on Migration and Religion
Immigrants often experience discrimination in areas of destination. Religion can strengthen their sense of worth, particularly when the circumstances surrounding departure from the country of origin are traumatic, as with exiles and refugees. We take a comparative approach and use examples from the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. The course broaches questions such as: how does religion transform (and how is it transformed by) the immigrant experience? When is religion used to combat stereotypes? Are there differences between the way
men and women or dominant groups and racial minorities understand religion? [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Patricia Fernández-Kelly. L01 10:00 am - 10:50 am M W; P99 TBA

SPA 224
Hispanic Studies: Introduction to Cultural Analysis
An introduction to the analysis of contemporary cultural texts (narrative, poetry, film, photography) from Latin America and Spain, with the support of various theoretical ideas. The course's main objective is to provide students with a set of strong conceptual, analytical and linguistic skills, which will be of great help in 300-level literature/culture courses. Other Requirements: Not Open to Seniors. Prerequisites and Restrictions: Another SPA 200-level course or instructor's permission. Other information: At least one of the classes will be held in the Princeton University Art Museum to examine some of the museum's holdings of Latin American photographs. Any student unable to register for the course, please contact Prof. Loureiro, loureiro@princeton.edu. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Manuel-Angel G. Loureiro. C01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm M W.


Course offerings in PDF format