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Course Offerings

Spring 2015-2016

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES

LAS 337
Race Relations in Twentieth Century Cuba

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
The Cuban revolution has been one of the most radical sociopolitical experiments of the past century. Comparing historiographical accounts with the recollections of individuals involved in the actual events, this course investigates the impact of the revolutionary process on Cuban racial politics. At the center of our enquire is an attempt to understand how Cubans see themselves in terms of race, and the role of those perceptions on the production of discourses and silences regarding racial inequality and discrimination. Other Requirements: International Travel Required. Prerequisites and Restrictions: This class will be offered in Havana, as part of the Princeton in Cuba Program. For more information, see: http://www.princeton.edu/oip/sap/programs . Fluency in Spanish. Other information: A series of movies and guest lectures will complement all seminar discussions.
Adrian Lopez-Denis. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T

LAS 363 / ANT 387

Medicine and Society in Contemporary Cuba
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
This course will approach human encounters with disease and wellness in contemporary Cuba from the point of view of medical anthropology. It will be based on the notion that understanding how Cuba achieves its impressive public heath indicators requires the study of both policies from above and practices from below. Prerequisites and Restrictions: This class will be offered in Havana, as part of the Princeton in Cuba Program. For more information, see: http://www.princeton.edu/oip/sap/programs. Fluency in Spanish. Other information: A series of movies and guest lectures will complement all seminar discussions.
Adrian Lopez-Denis. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W

CROSS-LISTED COURSES

ART 267 / LAS 267 / ANT 366
Mesoamerican Art

This course explores the visual and archaeological world of ancient Mesoamerica, from the first arrival of humans in the area until the era of Spanish invasion in the early 16th century. Major culture groups to be considered include Olmec, Maya, and Aztec. Preceptorial sections will consist of a mix of theoretically-focused discussions, debate regarding opposing interpretations in scholarship, and hands-on work with objects in the collections of the Princeton University Art Museum. Other information: Course can serve as a component of the Archaeology concentration. For department majors, satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement.
Bryan R. Just. L01 10:00 am - 10:50 am T Th

ART 367 / LAS 373 / ANT 379
Inca Art and Architecture

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
This course examines the art, architecture, and worldview of the greatest Andean civilization, the Incas. Conquered in 1532 by the Spanish, the Incas are known through archaeological and historical sources. Neither, however, can be taken at face value. The destructions of the conquest and differential preservation mean the archaeological record is incomplete. Likewise, Spanish historical sources present the Incas through European understandings, logic, and attentions. This course compares the two to reach a nuanced understanding of this ancient civilization. A spring break excursion will visit Cusco, Machu Picchu, and Lima. Other Requirements: International Travel Required. Prerequisites and Restrictions: Enrollment is by interview only. Students will be selected based on major, previous coursework, and languages. Department will cover basic transportation, lodging and program costs for the required break trip. Students must have a passport by the start of term and should expect to participate in moderate hiking. Reading or speaking knowledge of Spanish is not required, but is beneficial. Class participation is a major part of the final grade; thus, full engagement is essential. Other information: For department majors, satisfies Group 1 distribution requirement. To fill out the application for this course go to the Department of Art and Archaeology website: http://www.princeton.edu/artandarchaeology/undergrad/forms/ART367Application.pdf.
Andrew J. Hamilton. C01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm T Th

COM 563 / ENG 578 / LAS 564 / SPA 597
Studies in Forms of Narrative - Fiction in Latin America

The course explores a range of forms and uses of fiction in Latin America since the end of the 19th century, with special attention to changing contexts of politics and history. Texts are available in English, and also read in Portuguese or Spanish as knowledge or enthusiasm allows. Other Requirements: Not open to Freshmen.
Michael G. Wood. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th

EEB 332 / LAS 350
Pre-Columbian Peoples of Tropical America and Their Environments

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
The pre-European history of Amerind cultures and their associated environments in the New World tropics will be studied. Topics to be covered include the peopling of tropical America; development of hunting/gathering and agricultural economies; neotropical climate and vegetation history; and the material culture and social organization of native Americans. Field and laboratory experiences will incorporate methods and problems in field archaeology, paleoenthnobotany and paleoecology, and archaeozoology. Other Requirements: International Travel Required Prerequisites and Restrictions: Prerequisites: 211, and 321 and enrollment in the EEB Spring Semester in tropical ecology program in Panama.
Dolores R. Piperno. L01 TBA

EEB 338 / LAS 351
Tropical Biology

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
"Tropical Biology" is an intensive, three-week field course given at four sites in Panama, examining the origins, maintenance and major interactions among terrestrial plants and animals. The course provides the opportunity to appreciate (1) floral and faunal turnover among four rainforest sites (beta-diversity); and (2) floral and faunal turnover along vertical gradients, from ground to upper canopy, at two rainforest sites (vertical stratification). Students carry out individual projects at the sites. Fieldwork is supported by six orientation walks that introduce participants to common orders and families of plants and arthropods. Other Requirements: International Travel Required. Open to Juniors Only. Prerequisites and Restrictions: EEB 321 and enrollment in the EEB Spring semester tropical biology program in Panama.
Website: http://striweb.si.edu/princeton/courses/tropical_ecology.html
Yves F. Basset. L01 TBA

HIS 304 / LAS 304
Modern Latin America since 1810

This course surveys the main themes of Latin American history from independence to the present. The main focus is on the interaction between states and citizens, social relations, and economic development. Prerequisites and Restrictions:
PDF option not available to History concentrators.
Robert A. Karl. L01 10:00 am - 10:50 am M W; P01 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm W; P02 3:30 pm - 4:20 pm W; P03 7:30 pm - 8:20 pm W; P04 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm Th; P05 3:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th

LAO 200 / SOC 341 / LAS 336
Latinos in American Life and Culture

This course will consider how Latinos are transforming the United States socially, politically, and culturally, even as they themselves change in the process. Topics to be examined include meanings of "Latino" and "Hispanic" as ethno-racial categories, where Latinos fit in the American social and economic hierarchies, cultural identities, immigration and assimilation, the significance of Hispanics' unprecedented geographic dispersal, and their myriad impacts on mainstream music, literature, and language.
Heidy Sarabia. L01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm T Th

POL 477 / LAS 477
Latin American Politics from Below

This seminar focuses on the role of from-below groups in Latin American political history. It begins with an exploration of theoretical works that deal with social movements. It then analyzes the different periods in which the mobilization of from-below groups has influenced political transformations in the region. We will study the demands of indigenous, slaves and peasants during colonial times, and their contributions to the independence movement, early democratic transitions, social revolutions and guerrilla groups. We will also explore the region's new social movements, such as women, LGBTQI, and victims of political violence. Reserved Seats: Open to POL Concentrators Only 7.
Maria Paula Saffon Sanin. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th


POR 301 / LAS 303
Modern Brazilian Literature and Culture

Brazilian Amazonia is one of the richest areas in the world today. This course intends to explore the past of this region in a global perspective. It analyzes its birth in the 16th century in the context of Spain and the Spanish Empire; its involvement in 17th century international conflicts (the War of 30 Years); and its role in Atlantic and transoceanic history. Letters by Jesuit Ant—nio Vieira, one of the most significant writers in Baroque Europe, and the music of Carlos Gomes, the greatest Latin-American opera composer in the 19th century, will help us to imagine and write a global history of this fascinating part of the world. Prerequisites and Restrictions: POR 208 or POR 207S or instructor's permission. Other information: Class will be taught in Portuguese.
Serge M. Gruzinski. C01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W

POR 562 / COM 562 / LAS 562 / AAS 564
Brazilian Seminar - Cities and Nature

Brazilian society has become one of the most urbanized in the world. At the same time, many of the more widely circulating images of the country pertain to natural landscapes. In this course we study how ideas of city and nature have been constructed in opposition and complementarity, focusing on the 18th and 19th centuries. Emphasis is placed on Lusophone engagement with "non-western" epistemologies, urbanization, and "the production of nature." Topics to include transatlantic circulation of knowledge; slavery and the natural sciences; city planning and race; literature, visual arts, and spatial imaginaries. Other Requirements: Not Open to Freshmen. Other information: This interdisciplinary course focuses on Brazil but seeks to be both comparative and connective. Discussions may be held in Portuguese, Spanish, and/or English, but reading knowledge of Portuguese is required.
Bruno M. Carvalho, Lilia K. Moritz Schwarcz. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W

REL 275 / LAS 275
Religion and Social Change in Early Latin America

A history of religion and social change, the role of the Catholic Church in society, and the dynamic between Christianity and Native American religious traditions from Spanish colonization to the early nineteenth century. We will grapple with the many paradoxes that characterized the role of religion in people's lives through the lenses of "conquest" and religious change in indigenous communities, women and men's daily encounters with church institutions and devotional culture, changes in religious expression over time, changes in ideas of race, gender, and spiritual status, and the changing relationship between the church and state.
Jessica Delgado. L01 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm M W; P99 TBA

SPA 213 / LAS 214
Of Love and Other Demons

Love is the subject of the world's greatest stories. The passions aroused by Helen of Troy brought down a city and made Homer's masterpiece possible, while the foolishness of those in love inspired Shakespeare and Cervantes to create their most memorable characters. Many powerful Latin American and Spanish stories deal with the force and effects of love. In this course, we will study a group of films and literary fictions that focus on different kinds and forms of love. We will pay special attention to the forms of narrative love (quest, courting, adultery, heartbreaking), as well as the translation of love into language, body, and image. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 207 or higher, or instructor's permission. Other information: Course taught in Spanish. Screenings will occur on selected evenings, and films will be available for viewing on Blackboard.
Javier E. Guerrero. C01 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm M W

SPA 220 / LAS 220
El Género Negro: Crime Fiction

This course is an introduction to crime fiction from early 20th-century "locked room" mysteries to 21st century narco-narratives. It examines short stories, novels, films and critical writings about detective and crime fiction in Latin America and Spain. Topics include the genre's links to high and low literature, to film and to historical contexts such as immigration, state crime, drug culture and globalization. Authors include Roberto Arlt, Mar’a Elvira Bermœdez, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Roberto Bola–o, Jorge Luis Borges, Alicia GimŽnez Bartlett, Leonardo Padura Fuentes, Ricardo Piglia, Fernando Vallejo, and others. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 207 or higher; or instructor's permission. Other information: Course taught in Spanish
Rachel L. Price. C01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm M W

SPA 226 / LAS 226 CANCELED
Small Masterpieces: Art of the Short Story in Latin America

Discover the great tradition of the short story in modern Latin American literature. A wide range of short stories will be available to read, analyze and debate from modern and contemporary writers. Students will be encouraged to investigate the internal structure of this genre through critical and theoretical essays, many written by the authors themselves. 
Readings included works by Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, Silvina Ocampo, Felisberto Hernández, and Virgilio Piñera.
Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 207 or 209, or instructor's permission.

Other information: Course taught in Spanish.
Maria Gabriela Nouzeilles. C01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm T Th

SPA 300 / LAS 300
The Literature and Culture of Spain and Colonial Latin America: Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque

A study of the formation of a literary tradition in Spain through the close reading of selected texts in several genres from both Spain and colonial Latin America. Prerequisites and Restrictions: A 200-level SPA course.
Ronald E. Surtz. C01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm T Th

SPA 318 / LAS 368
Borges and the Universal Library

This course is designed as a survey of the writings of Jorge Luis Borges. Using the Borgesian notion that literature is a collaborative act between reader and writer, we will closely read a selection of texts by Borges and trace them back to his library, from German expressionism to the Nordic sagas, from Dante to Cervantes, from mathematical theory to the philosophies of Plato, William James and George Berkeley, from the Arabian Nights to the detective novel, from library science to film, from the craft of verse to the art of translation. Prerequisites and Restrictions: One SPA 200-level course above SPA 209 or instructor's permission. Other information: Course will be taught in Spanish.
Alberto Manguel. C01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W

SPA 319 / LAS 354
Topics in Cinema and Culture - Latin American Film - Poetics and Politics of the Third World

An exploration of a series of critically acclaimed contemporary Latin American films, accompanied by readings that provide a theoretical and historical framework for its analysis. Topics to be discussed, among others: subalternity and the Third World; sexual and racial politics; postcolonial poetics; genocide; cultural hybridism and mestizaje; dictatorship and populism; biopolitical fantasies. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 207 or higher, or instructor's permission.
Other information: Course taught in Spanish.
Javier E. Guerrero. S01 7:30 pm - 8:50 pm M W F01 7:30 pm - 10:20 pm T

SPA 345 / LAS 345 CANCELED
Topics in Latin American Literature and Ideology - Memory and Human Rights in Latin America

This course explores the role of human rights, memory, and political violence in contemporary Latin American cultural production. What does it mean to "represent" violence through language and images? How is truth constructed? What is the relationship between the act of witnessing and the law? Is the marketing of memory and trauma through museums and memorials weakening the political force of the collective struggles for justice and truth? These are some of the lenses through which we will read and interpret works in film, literature, art, theater, and photography from the Southern Cone, Perœ, and Mexico. Prerequisites and Restrictions: At least one advanced course beyond SPA 209 strongly recommended.
Maria Gabriela Nouzeilles. C01 7:30 pm - 8:50 pm T Th

COURSES OF INTEREST

ART 466 / SPA 466 / ARC 466 / URB 466
Havana: Architecture, Literature, and the Arts

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
This seminar will study the urban setting of Havana in its articulation with literature, film, and the arts from the early twentieth century to the present day. It will explore cross-disciplinary continuities, the engagement with multiple pasts, the city as a meeting place for all the arts and crucible of social identities. There will be a mandatory trip to Havana during Spring break. Other Requirements: International Travel Required. Open to Juniors and Seniors Only.
Other information: Basic transportation, lodging and program costs for the required break trip will be covered. Students pursuing a Certificate in Spanish will be required to submit all written work in Spanish. For department majors, satisfies Group 3 distribution requirement. To fill out the application for this course go to the Department of Art and Archaeology website: http://www.princeton.edu/artandarchaeology/undergrad/forms/ART466Application.pdf. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Michael G. Wood, Esther Roseli da Costa Azevedo Meyer. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm M

HIS 504
Colonial Latin America to 1810

An introduction to the scholarship on Latin America's colonial past, ranging from "central" areas in Mexico and the Andes to "marginal" regions. New concepts and topics have emerged. What are these new trends and what do they mean? Why do some types of questions now seem more urgent than others? To explore these questions and find out what problems of past historiographical traditions remain unsolved and deserve a new look, both classic texts and more recent works that display new approaches will be read, often in counterpoint. Other Requirements: Not Open to Freshmen.
Vera S. Candiani. S01 9:00 am - 11:50 pm Th

HIS 506
Modern Latin America since 1810

Course examines interactions between states and citizens since Latin American independence with an additional consideration of the region's integration into global economic and political systems. Other Requirements: Open to Graduate Students Only. Other information: Some Spanish is highly recommended. See instructor for more details.
Robert A. Karl. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T

POL 351 / WWS 311
The Politics of Development

This course will focus on the state's role in promoting economic growth and distribution in the developing world. The core organizing question for the course is: why have some regions of the developing world been more successful at industrialization and/or poverty alleviation than other regions. The students will learn about the patterns of development in Asia, Africa and Latin America, with special attention to such countries as China, India, South Korea, Nigeria and Brazil. General challenges that face all developing countries -- globalization, establishing democracy and ethnic fragmentation -- will also be analyzed. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Atul Kohli. L01 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm M W; P99 TBA

POL 477
Latin American Politics from Below

This seminar focuses on the role of from-below groups in Latin American political history. It begins with an exploration of theoretical works that deal with social movements. It then analyzes the different periods in which the mobilization of from-below groups has influenced political transformations in the region. We will study the demands of indigenous, slaves and peasants during colonial times, and their contributions to the independence movement, early democratic transitions, social revolutions and guerrilla groups. We will also explore the region's new social movements, such as women, LGBTQI, and victims of political violence. Reserved Seats: Open to POL Concentrators Only 7.
Maria Paula Saffon Sanin. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th

SPA 224
Hispanic Studies: Introduction to Cultural Analysis

An introduction to the analysis of contemporary cultural texts (narrative, poetry, film, photography) from Latin America and Spain, with the support of various theoretical ideas. The course's main objective is to provide students with a set of strong conceptual, analytical and linguistic skills, which will be of great help in 300-level literature/culture courses. Other Requirements: Not Open to Seniors. Prerequisites and Restrictions: Another SPA 200-level course or instructor's permission. Other information: At least one of the classes will be held in the Princeton University Art Museum to examine some of the museum's holdings of Latin American photographs. Any student unable to register for the course, please contact Prof. Loureiro, loureiro@princeton.edu. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Manuel-Angel G. Loureiro. C01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm M W

SPA 327 / URB 327 / LAO 327
Latino Global Cities

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
This seminar focuses on the comparative study of Latino urban cultures in U.S., Caribbean and Spanish cities (mainly New York City, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Madrid). Topics include the 2008 Financial Crisis, Occupy-like movements, global migratory flows, popular culture, memory, debt, visuality and citizenship. Paying close attention to their political and cultural contexts, flamenco, hip-hop, graffiti, visual culture, poetry, documentary films and political performances will be analyzed. Guest speakers and musicians will be part of the conversation. Other Requirements: International Travel Required. Not Open to Seniors. Prerequisites and Restrictions: A 200-level SPA course or instructor's permission. This course is primarily open to freshmen and sophomores who are considering the pursuit of studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures. Applicants must submit a one-page motivation letter to Prof. Germán Labrador Méndez (labrador@princeton.edu) and a selection of students will be contacted for an interview. Early applications encouraged. Final candidates will receive notification before December 10th. Preference will be given to potential concentrators. Other information: Course taught in Spanish. A mandatory trip to Puerto Rico will take place during the spring semester break (Friday, March 11 through Sunday, March 20, 2016). Basic travel expenses will be covered. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Arcadio Díaz-Quiñones, Germán Labrador Méndez. S01 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm T Th

SPA 547
Narrative Prose in Latin America - Finance and Form

This course examines the relations between economic systems and aesthetic form, paying special attention to the effects and representations of finance capital in Latin America from the eighteenth through the twenty-first centuries. Focusing on a cluster of questions rather than a historical genealogy, the course asks how economic systems translate into aesthetics and how aesthetic form renders, inverts or mimes such systems. Emphasis on slave-based economies, nineteenth-century finance capital, petroleum economies, and contemporary finance. Readings in literature, art history, and criticism. Other Requirements: Open to Graduate Students Only.
Rachel L. Price. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm M

SPA 548 / COM 542
Seminar in Modern Spanish-American Literature - Archival Research Workshop

This seminar is conducted as a workshop to train students in the methodology of archival research. We work with the papers of Latin American writers housed at Firestone Library, especially with recent acquisitions of letters and manuscripts by Cuban writer Severo Sarduy. Theoretical readings include texts by Derrida, Barthes, Murat, Freud, and others. Students are encouraged to publish the result of their semester-long research. Other Requirements:
Open to Graduate Students Only. Other information: Students will work with the Latin American collection at Firestone Library consulting the archives of Severo Sarduy, Mario Vargas Llosa, Reinaldo Arenas, Manuel Puig and others.
RubŽn Gallo. S01 4:30 pm - 7:20 pm T

URB 201 / WWS 201 / SOC 203 / ARC 207
Introduction to Urban Studies

This course will examine different crises confronting cities in the 21st century. Topics will range from informal settlements, to immigration, terrorism, shrinking population, sprawl, rising seas, affordable housing, gentrification, smart cities. The range of cities will include Los Angles, New Orleans, Paris, Logos, Caracas, Havana, New York, Hong Kong, Dubai among others. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
M. Christine Boyer. L01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm T; P01 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm T; P02 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm T; P03 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm T; P04 7:30 pm - 8:50 pm T; P05 7:30 pm - 8:50 pm T; P06 7:30 pm - 8:50 pm T; P07 11:00 am - 12:20 pm T; P08 11:00 am - 12:20 pm T

Course offerings in PDF format