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PLAS Events

Rubén Gallo to present "Havana in Transition"

Mar 1, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

New Trends in Latin American Studies Series
Featuring: Rubén Gallo (Spanish & Portuguese, Princeton University), with Respondent Rachel Price (Spanish & Portuguese, Princeton University)

Havana in Transition: a discussion of the political philosophy behind Havana’s major urban project in the 20th century: the Malecón.

Department of Religion presents “Race and Religion in the Americas and the Atlantic World: A Conference in Honor of María Elena Martinez”

Mar 3, 2017  ·  1:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m.  ·  105 East Pyne Rotunda

“Race and Religion in the Americas and the Atlantic World: A Conference in Honor of María Elena Martinez”

To register: http://religion.princeton.edu/rraa/

Sponsored by African American Studies, American Studies, The Center for the Study of Religion, The Council of the Humanities, Department of Religion, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Latin American Studies, Department of History, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Department of English, Department of Anthropology, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Latin America Workshop featuring Martín Marimón

Mar 3, 2017  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  Dickinson Hall, Room 210

"The Roaring Metropolis: Architecture, Housing Policy, and Social Mobility in the Buenos Aires of the 1920s"

Co-sponsored by the Program in Latin American Studies and the Center for Collaborative History

Luis Chitarroni to present "Cien Veces Tres: Una Investigación Sobre la Simetría"

Mar 7, 2017  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

Latin American Writers Series
Featuring: Luis Chitarroni (Argentine editor & writer)

Eduardo Luis Rodriguez to present on "Tropical Modernity: Neutra, Burle-Marx and Cuba - De Schulthess House"

Mar 8, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

Featuring: Eduardo Luis Rodriguez (Cuban Architectural Scholar, Visiting Professional Specialist and Visiting Lecturer in Latin American Studies and Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism & the Humanities)

Joaquín Medina Warmburg to present “Shaping Atmospheres: Early Environmental Approaches in Latin American Architecture”

Mar 14, 2017  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

Fellows Series
Featuring: Joaquín Medina Warmburg (Visiting Research Scholar and Lecturer, Program in Latin American Studies and Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism & the Humanities at Princeton University)

Ana María Ochoa presents “The Aural, the Oral, Silence”

Mar 15, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

New Trends in Latin American Studies Series
Featuring: Ana María Ochoa (Music, Columbia University)

PLAS Graduate Works-in-Progress

Mar 16, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

“Esquirlas de la Ruptura: México y el Surrealismo”
Presented by: Miguel Domínguez (Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Princeton University)
 
"Land Dispossessions and the Ecological Crisis in the Andes"
Presented by: Jonathan Aguirre (Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Princeton University)

Latin America Workshop featuring Teresa Davis

Mar 17, 2017  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  Dickinson Hall, Room 210

"Peopling a New World: Immigration, Race and the International Economy in 1920s Argentina"

Co-sponsored by the Program in Latin American Studies and the Center for Collaborative History

Jessica Delgado to present “Sacramental Learning: Confession, Communion, and Laywomen in Colonial Mexico"

Mar 29, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

Princeton Work-in-Progress Series
Featuring: Jessica Delgado (Religion, Princeton University)

Manuel Barcia Paz presents “White Cannibalism in the Slave Trade: The Curious Case of the Schooner 'Arrogante'”

Apr 4, 2017  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

Featuring: Manuel Barcia (Latin American History, University of Leeds)

The Portuguese ship Arrogante was captured in late November 1837 by the HMS Snake, off the coast of Cape San Antonio in Cuba. At the time of her capture, the Arrogante had more than 330 Africans on board, who had all been embarked at Gallinas by notorious slave dealer Pedro Blanco, and were bound to Cuba, consigned to the house of Pedro Martinez & Co. All of them were liberated in Montego Bay, Jamaica, where soon after their arrival, a chilling mystery surrounding the alleged practices carried out by her captain and crew were also brought to the attention of the local authorities. According to numerous witnesses, some members of the crew had killed an African man, cooking his flesh, and then serving it to the rest of the slaves on board. Additionally, the sailors were also accused of eating the heart and liver of the murdered man.

The examination of the story of what happened on the Arrogante constitutes another example that supports the case of historians who currently claim that the atrocities committed by the slavers were more common than what we have thought thus far. It also raises the question of why the slavers would sacrifice whom they hoped to sell upon their arrival in Cuba. This case also highlights the questionable impartiality of Jamaican magistrates, courts and authorities at the time that coincided with the final emancipation of the slaves in the British West Indies, and the paper discusses the weight and credibility given to testimonies received from African slaves, most of whom in this case were children.

Susana Draper to present "Constellations of 1968 Mexico. Experiments on Freedom and Democracy"

Apr 5, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

Princeton Work-in-Progress Series
Susana Draper (Comparative Literature, Princeton University)

Latin America Workshop featuring Felice Physioc

Apr 14, 2017  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  Dickinson Hall, Room 210

"Developing a Science of Society: Alejandro E. Bunge and the Creation of the Argentine Economy (1853-1917)"

Co-sponsored by the Program in Latin American Studies and the Center for Collaborative History

Eduardo Neves to present "Was There Ever a Neolithic in the Neotropics?: A Discussion from the Amazon"

Apr 19, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

New Trends in Latin American Studies Series
Featuring: Eduardo Neves (Anthropologist, Visiting Professor at Harvard)

Lena Burgos-Lafuente to present “A La Escucha de la Guerra Fría: El Ojo Acústico de Lorenzo Homar”

Apr 26, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  216 Burr Hall

PLAS Lunch Lecture
Featuring: Lena Burgos-Lafuente (Latin American Literature, Stony Brook University)

In this talk, Lena Burgos-Lafuente, Ph.D., examines key moments in the work of the graphic artist, Lorenzo Homar. She explores his beginnings as a political cartoonist in New York City in close collaboration with left-leaning publications (such as Weekly People, the official organ of the Socialist Labor Party). Lena turns to the development of his later critical and artistic positions in the context of the Cold War. She also focuses on the “acoustic eye” in his artistic collaborations with artists and writers such as Pau Casals, Tomás Blanco, and René Marqués. Homar’s work allows her to explore the political consequences of a sound studies approach to the state’s normalizing designs and dominant narrative of progress.

Lecture in Spanish

Related Events

Events relevant to the Program in Latin American Studies


Mellon Forum: C.J. Alvarez on "Police and Infrastructure in the U.S. - Mexico Borderland"
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 12:00 pm School of Architecture, South Gallery



Misanthropology: a geophilosophical approach
Tue, 3/28 · 5:00pm · 101 McCormick


Mestizaje, Hybridity, and Cultural Entanglements in colonial Latin America
Time: 1-5 pm, Friday 31 March, 2017
Location: Mumford Room, Madison Building (6th floor), Library of Congress.