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Lassen Fellowships in Latin American Studies

The Program in Latin American Studies (PLAS) offers Lassen Fellowships in Latin American Studies, which provide outstanding first-year graduate students with full tuition, a 12–month graduate stipend, and a research account to support fieldwork in the region during their first year at Princeton. Each spring, PLAS solicits departmental nominations of the most promising entering graduate students for fellowship consideration.

Nominations are evaluated for evidence of strong commitment to the study of Latin America, guided by a departmental assessment of each candidate’s overall potential for success. Lassen Fellows are appointed by the Program in Latin American Studies, and the fellowships are administered by the Graduate School.

LASSEN FELLOWS, 2010-2011

Ireri E Chávez-Bárcenas (Music)

Ireri E Chávez-Bárcenas

Chávez-Bárcenas earned the B.A. in music from the University of the Americas-Pueblas, Mexico and the M.A.R. in music and religion from Yale University. Her fields of special interest include arts and history of the “New Spain Era”, Mexican music, 17th and 18th century opera, religious studies, and musical paleography and codicology. She is currently working on a research project of the original manuscript of Handel’s Performing Parts of Laudate Pueri Dominum at the Yale University Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

Ruth Halvey (Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures)

Ruth Halvey

Halvey earned the B.A. from Swarthmore College. Before beginning graduate school, she worked for the Chiapas Photography Project, an arts organization that provides camera equipment and basic photographic instruction to indigenous people in and around San Cristóbal de las Casas. Additionally, Halvey has collaborated on academic projects at the CIDE and Instituto Mora and taught English at the UNAM. Her research interests include contemporary Mexican literature and visual arts, particularly representations of urban and drug-related violence.

Peter Johannessen (Politics)

Peter Johannessen

Johannessen earned the B.A. in political science and history from the University of Vermont, and also studied at the London School of Economics and Middlebury College. His senior thesis examined the relationship between democratic quality and economic development in South America, with a focus on the interplay between governance and foreign investment. His research interests include local governance, the political economy of development, and the relationship between democratic quality and scale.

Martín Marimón (History)

Martín Marimón

Marimón earned the B.A. in history from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina. He has been part of several seminars and workshops on diverse topics of intellectual history at his home university, where he has done some research on European positivist thought, as well as developed a strong interest on Latin American intellectuals, with an emphasis on the relationship between intellectual élites and politics. He is planning to do research on late 19th century Latin American positivism, particularly on conceptions of race and national identity during the period of the formation of modern nation-states in different Latin American countries.

Gabriel López-Moctezuma (Politics)

Gabriel López-Moctezuma

López-Moctezuma earned the B.A. in economics and political science from the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México. Previously, he worked as an economist in the Economic Research Department at Banco de México where he conducted research on the efficiency of macroeconomic forecasts using survey data from professional forecasters. His research interests include the political economy of financial and monetary institutions, as well as the effects of internationally inspired volatility on domestic politics in developing countries.