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''Every year our entering class of 170 has 40 to 50 members who were not science majors (religion, economics, philosophy, English, music, etc.).''

-- From a director of admissions at a leading medical school

''By all means follow your passion! We enroll concentrators in a wide range of fields: classics, Asian languages, theater arts, physics, chemistry, engineering. No matter what the major, it's also useful to take some courses that show your analytic ability.''

-- From a dean of admissions at a leading law school

''We really do mean it when we say that we welcome all majors. A major in the humanities or social sciences has several advantages:
  • it often reflects a broader range of interests
  • it often reflects an awareness of the subjective aspects of human experience; very important in medicine
  • it often helps to develop skills in discussion and interpersonal relations
  • it is particularly well suited to our curriculum, which is problem-based and centers on small-group discussion and self-directed inquiry.''

-- From a dean of admissions at a leading medical school

''We devote considerable resources to identifying and recruiting talented, driven individuals, and we welcome applicants in any field. In fact, the breakdown of majors of students joining our firm this fall is as follows: economics, public policy and international affairs, molecular biology, electrical engineering, politics, computer science, environmental engineering, and physics.''

-- From one of the best-known consulting firms

''We have a huge variety of majors -- electrical engineering, music, physics, all across the board. In fact, we sometimes get tired of yet another politics major. Students generally do better in majors they're really interested in; by all means study what you feel drawn to.''

-- From a dean of admissions at a leading law school

''We are less interested in students' academic backgrounds than in their talents and passion.''

-- From a leading consumer products software company

''There are at least 50 different majors represented in our entering class. There is no preferred major. We are looking for a diverse and rigorous course of study overall.''

-- From a dean of admissions at a leading law school

''About a quarter of our matriculants are nonscience majors. We look for a broad-based student body. The nontraditional student really enhances the traditional student body.''

-- From a director of admissions at a leading medical school

''More often than not we interview applicants who have chosen a major other than economics. While having a background in finance or economics certainly can only help a candidate, overall we are looking for those candidates who possess the raw intellect and ability to learn the business. Critical thinking is a key component of any major, and often the students who receive offers are able to exemplify their quantitative and analytical skills in the interview setting.''

-- From a major financial services firm

''We recruit students of all majors. What we care about is whether students know about and have an interest in our business. Some electives in economics or finance can be helpful, but we are definitely interested in students from all fields. In fact, one of our best hires is a comparative literature concentrator from Princeton.''

-- From a leading investment bank

''We definitely like to see a wide range of majors in our class. Concentrators in the humanities and the sciences stand out as applicants. We encourage concentrations in any field!''

-- From a dean of admissions at a leading law school

''About 40 percent of our matriculants major in a nonscience, which should be evidence that we care more about the whole student than the major, and will continue to do so.''

-- From a dean of admissions at a leading medical school

''We do not favor any majors over any others; 45 percent of the students in our entering class majored in subjects other than politics, history, and economics. Concentrating in other fields can be a distinguishing feature. In particular, rigorous training in the humanities will really help students get the most out of the way we teach.''

-- From a dean of admissions at a leading law school

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