III. The University and the Community

Community Use of University Resources

Introduction

The following guidelines describe the circumstances under which the general public may use the University’s nonacademic facilities. Use of the academic facilities by the public is not permitted except in the transaction of the University’s business or by permission of the Dean of the Faculty. These academic facilities include: faculty offices, research facilities, conference rooms, and classrooms (except where classrooms are used for public lectures or conferences as described in the guidelines).

Princeton University seeks to respond to community needs and the needs of the general public by sharing its resources and facilities when appropriate and possible. It encourages the participation of the community in activities of mutual benefit. However, it must protect the central educational purposes for which the University was established and must conserve its resources, both physical and financial. Accordingly, University functions have priority over community events in scheduling the use of facilities.

Administration

The following policies for the implementation of these guiding principles are administered by Conference and Event Services. It is the responsibility of that office to see that the policies are properly applied and, when necessary, to seek interpretations from appropriate University officials. It is recognized that these guidelines cannot cover every contingency. Questions about the use of facilities or about these guidelines should be directed to Conference and Event Services.

Types of Facility Use

Public participation in activities involving the use of University facilities takes place through five general kinds of invitation, each of which is discussed below.

By Explicit Invitation

Many activities in the University are unambiguously open to members of the general public. These are often announced in the Princeton Weekly Bulletin, and most are an integral part of the University’s function as an educational institution. Examples are: public lectures, open houses (at Peyton Hall, FitzRandolph Observatory, Firestone Library, etc.); conducted tours of the art museum, the chapel, and other buildings; athletic events; concerts and plays at McCarter Theatre and Alexander Hall; public skating at Baker Rink; and chapel services.

By Implicit Invitation

The University makes its grounds, waters, walkways, and roads generally available to the public, while reserving the right to regulate or prohibit their use. Such regulations may be called for when unrestricted use of these facilities could impede the University’s educational mission, could be dangerous to the public, could become a nuisance to the community, or could place the University in a position of substantial liability. The University may therefore be compelled to place what it considers to be reasonable limits on the use of selected areas, such as Lake Carnegie, the Woodrow Wilson School’s reflecting pool, and the front campus.

By Participation in University-Sponsored or Sanctioned Programs

Many University facilities are available to members of the general public on a limited basis, sometimes involving a charge, for activities with official University sponsorship where it is specifically determined that access by the general public is in the best interest of the University. Examples include: the programs of the Student Volunteers Council; authorized participation in certain academic programs; specified programs of the Athletic Department (outdoor tennis, squash privileges); Firestone Library privileges; the Program in Continuing Education; and the Teacher Preparation Program.

By Renting University Facilities in Periods of Low Usage, Especially in the Summer

Organizations wishing to rent University facilities should apply to Conference and Event Services.

Requests for use of University facilities will be considered for the following types of activities, subject to the limitations stated elsewhere in these guidelines.

1. Activities of a broad educational or informational nature sponsored by professional societies and other nonprofit organizations, and educational and training programs of the tax-exempt educational components of profit-making organizations whose principal business is not education.

2. Programs with artistic, cultural, or entertainment content, which may appeal to the University community.

3. Charitable events on a limited basis.

4. Nonprofit summer camps and institutes in such areas as sports, music, and the arts under the aegis of Conference and Event Services and directed by a salaried University official.

5. Student-initiated events approved by the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students or the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School.

The following types of activities ordinarily will not have access to University facilities.

1. Activities sponsored by off-campus organizations for political purposes or for fund raising for political goals or for influencing public policy. (For campus-based organizations, see pages 39–40.)

2. Other fund-raising activities (except for a limited number for charitable purposes).

3. Activities conducted primarily for the purpose of making a profit for the sponsoring organization which are not of general interest to the University community.

4. Activities which could be construed by the public to be educational courses or other activities sponsored by the University when, in fact, they are not so sponsored.

5. Activities that fall outside the guidelines.

The following additional considerations will be taken into account in considering requests for the use of University facilities.

1. The activity should not interfere with the schedule of normal activities of the University.

2. The sponsoring organization must show that it is fiscally sound and has the resources necessary to underwrite all risks associated with the event, and that it has demonstrated administrative capacity to organize and manage the event in a manner consistent with University traditions, standards, and requirements.

3. The content of the activity should be reasonably compatible with the primary activities and the mission of the University as an educational institution and should be carried out with the decorum appropriate to the academic environment.

4. Activities that might present problems for the local community, such as traffic congestion or noise, will be approved only after prior consultation and coordination with the local community.

5. Proposed activities will be reviewed to determine the extent to which they may disadvantage local business or University organizations through competition for patrons.

6. During the course of the academic year, when access to facilities must be limited due to extensive use for University purposes, preference will be given to outside groups hosted by campus organizations or departments and activities that are of interest to the University community.

The renting of University facilities will ordinarily be on a first-come-first-served basis for eligible organizations, except that campus-based groups or University-sponsored programs shall have priority insofar as administratively feasible in booking available space.

Charges for use of University facilities will be established in advance by Conference and Event Services for each activity.

By Private Invitation

Unless a member of the public uses University facilities through one of the avenues mentioned above, he or she must be the guest of a specific University person, who assumes responsibility for the guest’s activities and safety while the guest is on the University campus. This guest privilege shall not be construed to authorize members of the University community to make nonacademic facilities available to guests except for short visits, nor shall it be used to relieve non-University persons or groups of the responsibility for paying for the use of University facilities for which charges are made.

Any individual or group, including campus-based organizations, contemplating the use of University facilities should also consult the guidelines relating to political activities and those relating to University security for persons who are not members of the University (pages 81–82).

Regulations Governing Solicitation, Distribution, and Peaceful Dissent, Protests, and Demonstrations by Off-Campus Individuals or Organizations

Except for approaches regarding products or services related to the administrative, research, or teaching functions of the University addressed to faculty and staff members in their workplaces and in regular business hours, no individual or organization may distribute literature, advertise, solicit customers, seek donations, or make sales on campus on behalf of an off-campus individual or organization without the express authorization of the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students or the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School.

Commercial Sales

The Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students or the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School may grant permission for solicitations and sales by off-campus business concerns, on a case-by-case basis, only (1) when specifically requested to do so by a recognized University student organization or a University department or office, or (2) if they are entirely operated and originated by a member (or members) of the University community, they exist solely to serve the campus, and they are managed and operated independently of any other profit-making organization that does not exclusively serve the campus. Such permission, when granted, will be subject to such limitations as the Dean of Undergraduate Students or the Dean of the Graduate School may prescribe.

Charitable, Political, Religious, or other Solicitation or distribution

As a general rule, representatives of non-commercial off-campus organizations, such as political, religious, and charitable groups, will not be permitted to solicit on campus. However, individuals acting on behalf of candidates for public office or bona fide charitable, political, religious, or other organizations may seek permission to sell or distribute their literature under the following guidelines:

1. Nonmembers of the University community who wish to seek permission to distribute and/or sell such literature on the campus should apply to the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students during normal business hours, Monday through Friday.

2. In choosing among the sites where such literature may be sold or distributed, preference will be given to three locations: the area adjacent to Chancellor Green Center (on the Firestone Library side); the area in front of Frist Campus Center on the north side, by the Frist “gateway”; and the area in the vicinity of the east entrance to the University Store. Other locations include: the areas to the west and south of Alexander Hall, and to the east of Alexander Hall, between Stanhope Hall and West College; the area between Whig and Clio halls; the cobblestone area between Firestone Library and Washington Road; the area in the vicinity of the arch near the entrance to McCosh 50, Helm Hall; Scudder Plaza at Robertson Hall; the area adjacent to Shapiro Walk between the Department of Computer Science and Mudd Manuscript Library; the walkway in front of Nassau Hall; and the area in the vicinity of the north entrance to Jadwin Gymnasium.

3. Permission for the sale or distribution of such literature may be granted only for the hours between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., seven days a week.

4. The number of persons who, at any one time, will be permitted to sell or distribute such literature for any particular candidate or group is limited to one or two at any given location, and to five or six on the campus as a whole.

5. The number of occasions in which candidates or groups will be permitted to sell or distribute such literature will be limited normally to six visits during a given month. In special situations, such as an approaching election, more frequent visits may be permitted.

6. The total number of individuals distributing or selling such literature at any one location on campus will be limited. When several groups wish to distribute literature at a particular location, in accordance with general University policy, preference in use of campus facilities will be given to members of the University community. In acting on requests from members of outside groups and representatives of candidates, individuals who are sponsored by members of the University community will be preferred.

7. Harassment of members of the University community by those selling or distributing literature, or sale or distribution outside of the hours or locations for which permission has been granted, will be cause for the immediate revocation of permission for the sale or distribution of literature by those involved.

8. Decisions regarding requests under these guidelines will need to take into account both any special circumstances that may relate to University activities and the burden that permission to sell or distribute such literature may place on the University’s public safety forces and administrative staffs.

Peaceful Dissent, Protests, and Demonstrations

Policies regarding peaceful dissent, protests, and demonstrations for nonmembers of the University community as well as members of the University community are found in the section on “Peaceful Dissent, Protests, and Demonstrations” (see pages 5–7). Nonmembers of the University community should direct questions to and/or seek approval regarding schedule and location of protests and demonstrations from the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students, 313 West College, during normal business hours, Monday through Friday.

University Security Policy for Persons Who Are Not Members of the University

1. The University campus is generally open to persons who are not members of the University, in accordance with the guidelines enumerated in the section “Community Use of University Resources” in this booklet. Access to specific buildings and areas, however, may be restricted, in accordance with the same section. While on the campus, persons not members of the University are responsible for obeying University rules of conduct as well as state and federal law.

2. In investigating situations which suggest that violations of law or of University rules of conduct are likely to occur, Public Safety officers may ascertain the status of individuals present and ask them to explain their behavior. If adequate explanations are not provided, the individuals involved may be asked to cease what they are doing and to move on.

3. In cases of clear infractions of law or University rules by persons who are not members of the University, the response of the Department of Public Safety will be as follows:

a) In cases of minor disturbance or raucous behavior, individuals may be asked to cease or move on. In cases of failure to comply, the Public Safety officers may order the individuals to leave the campus or charge them with a criminal violation.

b) In cases of major importance, such as those involving serious property damage, theft, drugs, assault, or serious disturbances, offenders, or those aiding or abetting or attempting to commit these offenses, will be required to leave the campus and may have legal charges brought against them.

4. All complaints related to the implementation of this policy shall be directed to the Vice President for Campus Life or the Dean of the Graduate School.

5. Persons not welcome on campus will be dealt with as follows:

a) Public Safety officers, in reporting misconduct of major importance (see 3) by persons on campus who are not members of the University, may recommend that these persons be declared unwelcome on the campus for a specified period. Such recommendations will be reviewed carefully by the Director of the Department of Public Safety and then presented to the Executive Vice President, the Vice President for Campus Life, or the Dean of the Graduate School for action. Individuals will be declared unwelcome on campus only when they have demonstrated by their commission of documented actions that their presence on campus constitutes a clear threat to the safety or property of University members or to the orderly functioning of University activities or facilities.

b) In cases of repeated minor offenses or failures to comply as described in paragraph 3a above, the Executive Vice President, the Vice President for Campus Life, or the Dean of the Graduate School may declare a person persona non grata for up to one year. In more serious cases, as described in 3b above, the Executive Vice President, the Vice President for Campus Life, or the Dean of the Graduate School may declare a person persona non grata for up to four years; for multiple or repeated offenses of this kind, or for the most serious offenses (e.g., rape, assault with a deadly weapon, selling of narcotic drugs), the Executive Vice President, the Vice President for Campus Life, or the Dean of the Graduate School may declare a person persona non grata for an indefinite period.

c) Any individual who is declared unwelcome on the campus will be notified in writing by the Executive Vice President, the Vice President for Campus Life, or the Dean of the Graduate School of the following:

(1) That he or she is to remain off campus for the defined period.

(2) The reasons for this action.

(3) The fact that if he or she returns to the campus during this period, he or she will be liable to arrest for trespassing.

(4) That if he or she has grounds for requesting a review of this decision, he or she may contact the Executive Vice President, the Vice President for Campus Life, or the Dean of the Graduate School. The vice president or dean will review cases in consultation with the Director of the Department of Public Safety and the Rights and Rules Committee.