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9/14/2015 - Academic Expo for Freshmen: Come visit us for information on Materials Science & Engineering

Sep 14, 2015  ·  10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.  ·  Frick Chemistry Lab

Welcome Class of 2019! Interested in Materials Science & Engineering? Please visit us on Monday, September 14, 10:00 am -2 pm in the Frick Chemistry Lab. Speak with current MSE students to find out more information on the MSE Certificate Program.

Seminar 9/23/2015 - Vinod Menon, City College of New York

Sep 15, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Title and abstract to follow.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 10/7/2015 - Doros Theodorou, National Technical University of Athens

Oct 7, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Title and abstract to follow.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 10/14/2015 - Marilyn Minus, Northeastern Univ: Adapting Process-Structure Relationships for Property Enhancement in Nano-Composite Materials

Oct 14, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Abstract to follow.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 10/21/2015 - Nicole Zacharia, University of Akron

Oct 21, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Title and abstract to follow.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 10/28/2015 - Erika Eiser, University of Cambridge

Oct 28, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Title and abstract to follow.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 11/11/2015 - Ian Richardson, Leeds University: Model Structures for C-A-S-H(I)

Nov 11, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Abstract: Every year over seven billion cubic metres of Portland cement-based concrete are manufactured worldwide i.e. about one cubic metre for every person! The principal binding phase in all of this concrete is a calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C-(A-)S-H) phase. This C-(A-)S-H is virtually X-ray amorphous, compositionally and structurally very variable, and generally finely intermixed with other phases, all of which make it difficult to study. Researchers have as a consequence looked for compositional and structural similarity with natural crystalline calcium silicate hydrates - most commonly 14 Å tobermorite and jennite - and have attempted to synthesize single-phase C-S-H in the laboratory that is similar to the phase that forms in concrete. The crystallinity of synthetic C-S-H preparations varies considerably: some have poor powder X-ray diffraction patterns that are similar to those of the C-S-H that is present in most cement pastes, whilst others are quite highly ordered. The latter include C-S-H(I) for Ca/Si ratios less than about 1.4 and C-S-H(II) for higher values. C-S-H(I) has been considered to be a structurally imperfect form of 14 Å tobermorite and C-S-H(II) to be related in a similar way to jennite. Despite much research attention, there have been no structural models published for either phase that can account comprehensively for the experimental observations, which are rather numerous for C-S-H(I). The purpose of this seminar is to present a collation of the most important data for C-S-H(I) and to briefly outline new structural models that account for the observed trends. The models were derived using crystal-chemical and geometrical reasoning, which necessitated a review of general aspects of the crystal chemistry of calcium silicate hydrates and related phases. The relevance of this information to atomistic modelling studies of C-S-H will be emphasized.

Bio: Ian Richardson is Professor of Civil Engineering Materials at the University of Leeds, UK. He received his D.Phil. from the University of Oxford in 1991 and has been at Leeds since 1995. He is a materials scientist whose main research interests concern advancing understanding of the microstructure, chemistry and properties of cementitious materials and related phases. His most recent work has focused on the crystal chemistry of calcium silicate hydrates and layered double hydroxides.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 11/18/2015 - Gleb Yushin, Georgia Institute of Technology: Nanostructured Composite Electrodes for Energy Storage Devices

Nov 18, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Title - Nanostructured Composite Electrodes for Energy Storage Devices: Synthesis, Applications and Operando Characterization

Abstract: Energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, are critical for the development of zero-emission electrical vehicles, large scale smart electrical grid, energy efficient ships and locomotives and various mobile electronic devices. This talk will focus on the development of nanocomposite electrodes for several classes of devices: (i) ultra-high capacity Li ion and Li metal batteries based on conversion-type cathodes, such as sulfur, lithium sulfide and several types of metal fluorides; (ii) safer all-solid state rechargeable Li batteries; (iii) low-cost, high voltage aqueous Li ion batteries, and (iv) high power asymmetric supercapacitors. The rationale for the selection of active materials, surface coatings and electrolyte compositions as well as challenges associated with different types of materials will be discussed. Various routes to overcome existing challenges will be presented.

Bio: Gleb Yushin is a Professor at the School of Materials and Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and a Co-Founder of Sila Nanotechnologies, Inc.. For his contributions to materials science, Prof. Yushin has received numerous awards and recognitions, including the prestigious Kavli Fellow Award, R&D 100 Award, Honda Initiation Grant Award, National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award, and several distinctions from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), such as Nano 50 Award. Dr. Yushin has co-authored over 30 patents and patent applications, over 100 invited presentations and seminars and over 100 publications on nanostructured materials for energy related applications. His current research is focused on advancing energy storage materials and devices for electronics, transportation and grid applications.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 12/2/2015 - Franz-Josef Ulm, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dec 2, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 12/9/2015 - Rafael Verduzco, Rice University: Multi-functional Organic Electronics through Conjugated Block Copolymers

Dec 9, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Abstract: Organic electronic materials have the potential to produce a new class of low-cost, portable, and flexible electronic applications and devices. This includes photovoltaics, batteries, and transistors capable of being printed on virtually any surface at low cost. However, these various applications rely on the development of organic materials which can simultaneously and effectively perform a variety of functions. For example, polymers used in photovoltaics must absorb light, separate photoexcited states, and transport charges while also being compatible with conventional solution-processing techniques. Polymers used in battery electrodes require both ion- and electronic conductivity and compatibility with an electrochemically active material. Often times, optimization of one property is detrimental to another or can lead to materials that are insoluble and difficult to synthesize or process. This talk focuses on the development and implementation of conjugated block copolymers, which combine the properties of two or more -conjugated polymer blocks. I will present the design and development of this class of materials and their use in organic photovoltaic devices and flexible battery cathodes. All-conjugated block copolymers that bring together a hole- and electron-transporting polymer block can be implemented in organic photovoltaic devices. Block copolymers with one conjugated polymer block and an ion-conductive block can be applied as binders in battery cathodes. Challenges include the development of versatile materials synthesis strategies, understanding the electronic properties at interfaces, and understanding the relationship between physical properties and processing history.

Bio: Rafael Verduzco is the Louis Owen Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice University. Rafael obtained his B. S. degree in Chemical Engineering at Rice and Ph. D. degree in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology. He spent two years at the Center for Nanoscale Materials Sciences (CNMS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Verduzco’s research expertise is in materials chemistry and polymers engineering, with an emphasis on conjugated block copolymers, bottlebrush polymers, and liquid crystal elastomers. He has been recognized with the NSF CAREER Award and the ACS PRF Doctoral New Investigator award. More information is available online: http://polymers.rice.edu.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 12/16/2015 - Cory Dean, Columbia University: Engineering New Materials from Old Materials

Dec 16, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Abstract: Graphene is probably the best known "exfoliatable" material, in which a  two-dimensional sheet of carbons atoms, just one atom thick, can be peeled from a bulk piece of graphite.  However this represents just one of a larger class of van der Waals materials, in which atomic monolayers can be mechanically isolated from the bulk. The capability to integrate these materials with one another provides an exciting  opportunity in which we can "mix and match" the constituent material properties, by fabrication of multi-layered heterostructures. In this talk I will discuss both fundamental science and technological applications that are being enabled by this new type of materials fabrication.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.