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Seminar 3/11/2015 - Andre Taylor, Yale University: Advanced Energy Conversion and Storage Devices using Nanostructured Materials

Mar 11, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Abstract: One of the key challenges facing the widespread use and commercialization of promising energy devices (i.e. fuel cells, batteries, organic solar cells etc.) is the high cost of the electrocatalytic and electrolyte materials and inefficiencies in their assembly and utilization.  In this talk, I will present three examples of how we are designing nanomaterials such as graphene-based carbons and bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys that can be incorporated into multifunctional composites for high performance nanostructured-enabled energy devices.
 
1) Spin Spray Layer-by-Layer (SSLBL) Assembly. We have developed a fully automated SSLBL system with deposition at sub-second cycle times allowing nano-level control over film growth and efficient formation of a conducting network not available with other solution based deposition methods for lithium ion battery electrodes. This platform technology can be used to create many other systems (i.e. specialty coatings, drug delivery, etc.)
2) Electrocatalysts. We will describe a new class of materials, Pt58Cu15Ni5P22 bulk metallic glass that can circumvent Pt-based anode poisoning and agglomeration/dissolution typically associated with supported catalysts during long-term operation in fuel cells. These amorphous metal alloys can serve as an interesting platform for next-generation catalysts and devices such as the first all bulk metallic glass micro fuel cell.
3) Network Electrodes (See Fig.). Here we describe a technique for developing freestanding multifunctional SWNT composite thin films that provides a fundamental engineering basis to bridge the gap between their nano and macroscale properties for solar cell transparent conductive electrodes. We will also describe recent efforts in using these films as active layers in hybrid SWNT/Si solar cell device as well as the use of Förster resonance energy transfer for high efficiency small molecule and polymer solar cells.

Bio:  Prof. André D. Taylor is an Associate Professor and leads the Transformative Materials and Devices Group in the Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department at Yale University. He specializes in the synthesis and arrangement of nanomaterials in devices such as fuel cells, lithium ion batteries, and solar cells. He received all three degrees in chemical engineering with a BS from the Missouri University of Science and Technology, an MS from Georgia Institute of Technology, and a PhD from the University of Michigan. While in graduate school Dr. Taylor was a Sloan Fellow, NSF-Rackham Merit Fellow, Eastman Kodak Fellow, and GEM (MS and PhD) Fellow. He worked as a research engineer for DuPont’s Engineering Polymers division and Intellectual Asset Management Group and was a research faculty scientist in the chemical engineering department at the University of Michigan. Dr. Taylor has developed CMOS compatible micro fuel cells (with integrated heaters and temperature sensors) and a method of patterning ITO substrates for both flat and non-planar surfaces for optoelectronic devices (Artificial Eye Project). Dr. Taylor has given several invited lectures at the local, national, and international levels. He has several patents and archival publications related to his research. He is an NSF CAREER award recipient and a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) recipient. See website above for publication links and recent press releases from his lab. Dr. Taylor is currently on sabbatical at MIT as a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Visiting Associate Professor.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 3/25/2015 - Surita Bhatia, SUNY Stony Brook

Mar 25, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 4/1/2015 - Martin Bazant, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Apr 1, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

MSE Open House 4/6/2015: Please join us to learn more about the Materials Science & Engineering Certificate Program

Apr 6, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Atrium

Please join us for the MSE Open House to learn about the MSE Certificate Program. Speak with current students about classes, their experiences and joining the program. Meet with PRISM faculty to discuss your research interest. Pizza lunch will be served.

Seminar 4/15/2015 - Shanhui Fan, Stanford Univ.: Control Light for Information and Energy Applications: One-way Road for Light and Radiative Cooling

Apr 15, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Abstract: Electromagnetic waves, or light, represent a fundamental aspect of nature. New capabilities to control light therefore can have important implications for a wide range of applications including information and energy technologies. In this talk, we will discuss our recent works in seeking to develop a gauge field for photons that breaks time-reversal symmetry of light, which is important for creating non-magnetic one-way non-reciprocal devices on chip that is topologically robust. We will also present recent results in seeking to control thermal radiation with photonic structures, which has led to the experimental demonstration of daytime radiative cooling.

Bio: Shanhui Fan is a Professor of Electrical Engineering, and the Director of the Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, at the Stanford University. He received his Ph.D in 1997 in theoretical condensed matter physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His research interests are in fundamental studies of solid state and photonic structures and devices, especially photonic crystals, plasmonics, and meta-materials, and applications of these structures in energy and information technology. He has published over 330 refereed journal articles, has given over 250 invited talks, and was granted 48 US patents. Prof. Fan received a National Science Foundation Career Award (2002), a David and Lucile Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering (2003), the National Academy of Sciences Award for Initiative in Research (2007), and the Adolph Lomb Medal from the Optical Society of America (2007). He is a Fellow of the IEEE, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America,  and the SPIE.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 4/22/2015 - Stephen Fonash, Penn State University

Apr 22, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Title and abstract to follow.

Bio: Stephen J. Fonash holds the Bayard D. Kunkle Chair Emeritus in Engineering Sciences at the Pennsylvania State University and is Director Emeritus of the Penn State Center for Nanotechnology Education and Utilization (CNEU). Dr. Fonash’s research focuses on utilizing nanotechnology in energy conversion, biomedical processes, detectors, sensors, and thin film transistors. He has published over 300 papers in these areas along with three books. His book contributions have been in the area of photovoltaics with the last two being “Solar Cell Device Physics” (Elsevier, 2010) and “Introduction to Light Trapping in Solar Cell and Photo-detector Devices” (Elsevier, 2014). Prof. Fonash’s device transport computer modeling code AMPS (www.ampsmodeling.org), developed with a number of his graduate students and post-docs, has been downloaded by over 3000 groups around the world for diode, solar cell and photo-detector device design and physical understanding as well as for graduate-level teaching purposes.

Prof. Fonash holds 32 patents, a number of which have been licensed by industry. He has consulted for a variety of firms and has co-founded two companies. Prof. Fonash is a Life Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.

Seminar 4/29/2015 - Maria Juenger, Univ. of Texas-Austin: The Future of Concrete May Be in its Past

Apr 29, 2015  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.  ·  Bowen Hall Auditorium

Abstract: The concrete industry is under increasing pressure to reduce the energy used in production of portland cement and the associated greenhouse gas emissions. There are several possible ways to address this challenge, but the most straightforward is to minimize the amount of portland cement used by substituting other materials to make concrete binders.  We can learn a lot from the Romans, who made strong, durable concrete without any portland cement at all (though not without greenhouse gas emissions!).  We are entering a natural pozzolan renaissance, where the industry is searching far and wide for alternative cementitious materials, including those that mimic the Roman pozzolana.  This presentation will address current research on alternative concrete binders, including the characteristics and performance of North American natural pozzolans.

Bio: Dr. Maria Juenger is Professor and John A. Focht Centennial Teaching Fellow in the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where she has been since 2002.  Dr. Juenger received her B.S. degree in Chemistry from Duke University and Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University.   After completing her Ph.D., she was a postdoctoral researcher in Civil Engineering at the University at California, Berkeley. Dr. Juenger’s teaching and research focus on materials used in civil engineering applications.  She primarily examines chemical issues in cement-based materials; these include phase formation in cement clinkering, hydration chemistry of portland cement, calcium sulfoaluminate cement, and supplementary cementitious materials, and chemical deterioration processes in concrete.  In 2005 she received a Faculty Early CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation.  She has received several awards from the American Concrete Institute for her research, teaching, and service, including the Walter P. Moore, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award in 2009, the Young Member Award for Professional Achievement in 2010, the Wason Medal for Materials Research in 2011, and was named a fellow of the society in 2014.  She is currently chair of American Concrete Institute committee 236 - Material Science of Concrete and is a member of the RILEM technical committee on supplementary cementitious materials.

All seminars are held on Wednesdays from 12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. in the Bowen Hall Auditorium Room 222. A light lunch is provided at 11:30 a.m. in the Bowen Hall Atrium immediately prior to the seminar.