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Past Symposia

Steinschriften245.jpg
2013
Enduring Dharma
A Symposium on the Inscription of Buddhist Scriptures on Stone
Saturday, 20 April 2013
10:00 am−6:00 pm
Betts Auditorium (Architecture N101)
Princeton University
Organized by the Buddhist Studies Workshop and cosponsored by the Department of Religion, the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art, the Program in East Asian Studies, the Center for the Study of Religion, and the Silk Road Project
 

Bowls
2009
China Seen by the Chinese: Documentary Photography, 1951−2003
An international symposium in conjunction with the exhibition "Humanism in China: A Contemporary Record of Photography" on view at the China Institute, New York, NY from 24 September−13 December 2009.
Saturday, 24 October 2009
9:00 am−5:30 pm
Helm Auditorium, McCosh 50
Princeton University
Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art and the Princeton University Art Museum

Friends
2009
Friends at a Brushwood Gate
A Symposium on East Asian Art in Honor of Professor Yoshiaki Shimizu
Saturday and Sunday, 18-19 April 2009
9:00 am to 5:00 pm
Helm Auditorium, McCosh 50,
Princeton University
Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art and co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Archaeology and the Princeton University Art Museum
This symposium, organized by the Tang Center, will honor Yoshiaki Shimizu, Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology, who will retire after more than twenty-five years of teaching at Princeton. Professor Shimizu's graduate students, past and present, will offer papers on their recent research.

Articulations
2009
ARTiculations
An international symposium in conjunction with the exhibition "Outside-In: Chinese × American × Contemporary Art" on view at the Princeton University Art Museum
Saturday, 7 March 2009
9:00 am−5:30 pm
Helm Auditorium, McCosh 50,
Princeton University
Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art and the Princeton University Art Museum

"ARTiculations" intends to give voice to the six Artists in the exhibition "Outside In" complemented with remarks from several scholars who will offer different perspectives on contemporary art. The major goals of the symposium and the exhibition are to show the great diversity of what we call "Chinese" art today and to illustrate how complex and uncertain the labels "contemporary," "Chinese," and even "American" have become ("art" has always been uncertain).

The featured artists of the exhibition include Arnold Chang, Michael Cherney, Zhi Lin, Liu Dan, Vannessa Tran, and Zhang Hongtu. They are all American citizens; they have all been selected for quality and diversity in style, subject matter, geographical background, gender, and experience; and they are all very fine artists and highly articulate as well.


Erligang
2008
Art and Archaeology of the Erligang Civilization
An international symposium
26-27 April 2008
101 McCormick Hall
Princeton University
Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art

Tang Logo
2007
Dunhuang Manuscripts and Painting
An International Symposium Honoring James and Lucy Lo
28 September 2007
1:30–6:00 pm
101 McCormick Hall
Princeton University
Organized by the Buddhist Studies Workshop and co-sponsored by the Tang Center for East Asian Art, with additional support from the Princeton University Library, the Program in East Asian Studies, the Department of Religion, Yale University Council on East Asian Studies, the American Trust for the British Library, and the Mercer Trust.

Zen
2007
Re-presenting Emptiness
A Symposium on Zen and Art in Medieval Japan
14–15 April 2007
McCosh 10
Princeton University
Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art and co-sponsored by the Princeton University Art Museum in association with the Japan Society, New York

Meiji
2006
Meiji Eyes
A panel discussion on Japanese woodblock prints at the turn of the nineteenth century
27 September 2006, 4:30 p.m.
101 McCormick Hall
Princeton University
Organized by the Princeton University Art Museum and co-sponsored by the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art.

The panel discussion will feature four presentations related to the exhibition Japanese Views of East and West: Imprinting the Other in Meiji Eyes, on view at the Princeton University Art Museum from September 23, 2006, to January 7, 2007. Each presentation will consider the different ways in which the sharp political and social transitions of the Meiji period (1868-1912) were expressed in the print medium, particularly approaches to depicting the foreign and the Japanese relationship to other cultures. The panel will also examine the legacy of the images of Meiji prints extending to the present day.

Nicole Fabricand-Person, Lafayette College Another Other: Depiction of the Non-White Foreigner in Meiji Japan

Sheldon Garon, Princeton University Samuel Smiles in Japan: Moral Education from Self-Help to Thrift

Benjamin Elman, Princeton University Japanese Woodblock Prints in Cyberspace: The MIT Affair as an Educational Lesson

David Howell, Princeton University The Girl in the Horse-dung Hairdo


Bridges
2006
Bridges to Heaven
A Symposium on East Asian Art in Honor of Professor Wen C. Fong
Saturday and Sunday, 1-2 April 2006
Helm Auditorium, McCosh 50
Princeton University
Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art with support from The Blakemore Foundation, and co-sponsored by the Princeton University Art Museum, the East Asian Studies Program, and the Department of Art and Archaeology

Recarving
2005
Recarving China's Past
The Art, Archaeology, and Architecture of the "Wu Family Shrines"
Saturday and Sunday
30 April–1 May 2005
McCosh 50
Princeton University
Organized by the Princeton University Art Museum in memory of Frederick W. Mote. Co-sponsored in part by the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange, the East Asian Studies Program and the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art at Princeton University; with the support of the Asian Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh, the History Department and the East Asian Library at the University of California at Berkeley.

Family Model
2004
The Family Model in Chinese Art and Culture
Saturday and Sunday, 6-7 November 2004
Organized by the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art and co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Archaeology and the Princeton University Art Museum with support from the Freeman Foundation

Xu bing
2003
Persistence/Transformation

Text as Image in the Art of Xu Bing

Inaugural symposium celebrating the dedication of the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art

Saturday, 15 February 2003
1:30 - 5:30 pm
McCosh 10
Princeton University
Organized by the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art