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Department of Art and Archaeology

Chair

Thomas F. Leisten

Departmental Representative

Elizabeth Anne McCauley

Director of Graduate Studies

Andrew M. Watsky

Professor

Robert W. Bagley

Hal Foster

Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann

Michael Koortbojian

Thomas F. Leisten

Elizabeth Anne McCauley

Hugo Meyer

John A. Pinto

Jerome Silbergeld

Andrew M. Watsky

Associate Professor

Esther da Costa Meyer

Brigid Doherty, also German

Assistant Professor

Bridget Alsdorf

Nathan Arrington

Rachael Z. DeLue

Chika Okeke-Agulu, also African American Studies

Christopher Petty Heuer

Nino Zchomelidse

Lecturer with Rank of Professor

James C. Steward

Visiting Lecturer with Rank of Professor

Yve-Alain Bois

Lecturer

Christina T. Halperin

Colin Lang

Jeremy Melius

Jelena Trkulja

Associated Faculty

Leonard Barkan, Comparative Literature

Anthony T. Grafton, History

Michael W. Jennings, German

Susan Naquin, History, East Asian Studies

P. Adams Sitney, Lewis Center for the Arts, Visual Arts

Susan A. Stewart, English


Art Museum


Director

James C. Steward

Associate Director

Rebecca E. Sender

Curator of Education and Academic Programs

Caroline I. Harris

Research Curator

Betsy J. Rosasco

Curator

Laura M. Giles

Bryan R. Just

Cary Y. Liu

J. Michael Padgett

Joel M. Smith

Associate Curator

Calvin D. Brown

Karl E. Kusserow

Assistant Curator

Xiaojin Wu

Locks Curatorial Fellow for Contemporary Art

Kelly Baum

Chief Registrar

Maureen A. McCormick

Managing Editor

Jill E. Guthrie

Conservator

Norman E. Muller


Index of Christian Art


Director

Colum P. Hourihane

Reader

Judith K. Golden

Adelaide Bennett Hagens

Beatrice T. Radden Keefe

Jessica L. Savage


The Department of Art and Archaeology is devoted to the study of the visual arts and the investigation of material artifacts from a wide range of cultures and periods. It is also where students interested in the practice of art (taught by faculty in the Program in Visual Arts) can pursue a major. Working closely with faculty members in small classes and often dealing directly with original objects and primary sources, students can explore subjects as diverse as Roman city planning, Islamic archaeology, Japanese painting, Renaissance architecture, Chinese cinema, 19th-century photography, and contemporary art.

Students in the Department of Art and Archaeology learn techniques for analyzing visual materials and locating them within time and place. They also investigate the factors that influence stylistic change (e.g., religious beliefs, economic constraints, patronage demands, and technological changes). Like any humanist or social scientist, they must evaluate evidence, form hypotheses, test data, and draw conclusions. Successful majors master the translation of visual perceptions into linguistic expression, develop visual memory, and make connections with a wide array of historical evidence. Students must have at least a B- average based on courses and independent work in order to graduate from the department.

Information and Departmental Plan of Study

Students interested in majoring in the Department of Art and Archaeology must choose one of three programs, each of which has its own admission prerequisites and curricular requirements.

Advanced Placement

One unit of advanced placement credit is granted for a score of 5 on the Art History Advanced Placement Examination.

Early Concentration

A sophomore may apply for early concentration through consultation with the departmental representative.

Study Abroad

Foreign study can be a richly rewarding part of any concentration in the Department of Art and Archaeology. Art history courses taken abroad (normally up to two per semester or four for a year in a study abroad program) can be pre-approved for departmental credit by the departmental representative. Students generally study abroad during the junior year or the first semester of the senior year. Junior independent work can be completed under the supervision of a departmental faculty member with prior approval and ongoing contact with the faculty adviser. Senior independent work in the fall of the senior year may be done overseas, but the spring semester work must be done in residence. Students contemplating study abroad should speak with the departmental representative as early as possible and should plan to take courses in the language of the country in which they wish to study.

In addition, students interested in archaeology may choose to participate in overseas archaeological excavations undertaken by departmental faculty. For further information, contact Professor Thomas Leisten.

Preparation for Graduate Study

Students who are contemplating graduate work in the history of art and archaeology are reminded that most graduate programs require a reading knowledge of two or more foreign languages. In most fields German is particularly important.

Certificate in Visual Arts. For certificate requirements, see the description under the Program in Visual Arts.

Resources for Research. Outstanding resources are available for students concentrating in art and archaeology. These include the Marquand Library, a non-circulating research library with over 400,000 books; the Princeton University Art Museum; the Index of Christian Art; the Visual Resources Collection; and the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art. Firestone Library also houses extensive holdings of illuminated manuscripts, prints, and photographs in departments including the Manuscripts Division, Graphic Arts Collection, Rare Books and Special Collections, the Cotsen Children's Library, and the Western Americana Collection. Staff members in the University Art Museum and the Index of Christian Art occasionally offer courses or otherwise participate in the department's teaching activities. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the proximity of major museum collections in New York, Philadelphia, and elsewhere.

Honors. Honors are awarded by a vote of the faculty to students having the highest, weighted grade point average based on grades achieved in departmental courses (including all courses taken outside the department that have been designated as cognates), junior independent work, senior independent work, and the senior oral examination.

Program 1. History of Art

This central program allows a broad and rich exposure to the visual arts produced in a great variety of periods and locations.

Prerequisites

Any two courses offered by the Department of Art and Archaeology.

Program of Study

A total of 10 courses in the Department of Art and Archaeology, including ART 400 (Junior Seminar) and two seminars at the 400- or 500-level. Students must also take at least one course in five of the following six distribution areas: East Asia; ancient Mediterranean; medieval/early Islamic; Renaissance/Baroque/late Islamic; African/Pre-Columbian; and modern/contemporary (19th century to the present). In choosing courses to satisfy the distribution requirement, students are encouraged to explore a range of media (e.g., architecture, painting, sculpture, photography, film). Thematic courses as well as courses spanning more than one area will be allocated to a distribution area on a case-by-case basis. ART 100, ART 101, ART 400, and ART 401 count as departmentals but not as distribution courses.

Cognates. No more than two cognate courses taken in other departments (including the Program in Visual Arts) may be counted toward the 10 departmentals. This includes summer courses. Students participating in the Study Abroad Program may be allowed to count more than two courses taken overseas as departmentals. All cognate courses must be approved prior to enrollment by the departmental representative based on the submission of a syllabus and course description. Courses cross-listed with the Department of Art and Archaeology automatically count as departmentals.

Junior Seminar. During the fall of the junior year, all majors must take the junior seminar (ART 400). The course introduces students to various methodologies used by art historians and archaeologists, and prepares them for writing the junior and senior independent work. Students who are abroad during the fall of the junior year can complete the junior seminar during the fall semester of the senior year.

Independent Work

Junior Independent Work. The fall junior independent work consists of a paper of approximately 20 pages addressing the state of the literature on a particular subject selected by the student as well as various methodologies appropriate to it. This paper is usually advised and graded by the instructor of the student's junior seminar. During the spring term, students write a second research paper (approximately 25 pages) with a departmental adviser of their choice.

Senior Independent Work. The senior independent work consists of a year-long research project of approximately 60-80 pages on a topic selected by the student and approved by the faculty adviser. The student selects a faculty adviser in the spring of the junior year and submits an extensive outline and annotated bibliography to the adviser by late November of the senior year. The thesis grade is the average of the grades given by the faculty adviser and a second faculty reader.

Senior Departmental Examination

The senior departmental examination consists of a one-hour oral examination covering material from departmental courses and attended by three faculty members (including the adviser of the senior thesis, its second reader, and one additional faculty member).

Program 2. History of Art and Visual Arts

Concentrators in this program explore the modes of thought and practice of visual media and develop their creative skills in connection with a general program of humanistic education. Courses are offered in ceramics, digital and analog photography, drawing, film and video production, film history and criticism, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, installation art, and contemporary criticism as well as art history.

Prerequisites

Two courses in the Department of Art and Archaeology and two studio courses in the Program in Visual Arts. By the first Tuesday following spring break, sophomores submit an application and a portfolio of creative work to the Lewis Center for the Arts administrative office. The admissions committee for the Program in Visual Arts will notify students accepted into the program by early April. No AP credit is accepted toward the Program 2 concentration.

Program of Study

A total of 12 courses, of which at least four must be from the Department of Art and Archaeology, and at least six from the Program in Visual Arts.

The visual arts courses must include: at least two different media; at least two studio courses at the 300- or 400-level; and VIS 392, Issues in Contemporary Art, or a cognate course. Visual Arts 392 is strongly recommended for studio artists, for whom it has been specifically designed. However, it is possible to substitute a relevant 300- or 400-level seminar directly related to the medium a student practices with the prior permission of the director of the Program in Visual Arts. The Department of Art and Archaeology courses must include: ART 400 (taken in the fall of the junior year); a course in the modern/contemporary distribution area (19th century to the present); and courses in two other distribution areas (see Program 1).

Cognates. Up to two courses in studio art or art history may be taken at other institutions during the summers with prior approval by the departmental representative (for art history courses) or the director of the Program in Visual Arts (for studio art courses). Courses taken as part of the Study Abroad Program may be allowed to count as departmentals with prior approval from the departmental representative. A cognate course in another department is accepted only for Visual Arts 392.

Junior Seminar. During the fall of the junior year, all concentrators must take the junior seminar (ART 400). This course introduces students to various methodologies used by art historians and archaeologists. Students who are abroad during the fall of the junior year can complete the junior seminar during the fall semester of the senior year.

Independent Work

Junior Independent Work. The fall junior independent work consists of a paper of approximately 20 pages addressing the state of the literature on a particular subject selected by the student as well as various methodologies appropriate to it. This paper is usually advised and graded by the instructor of the student's junior seminar (ART 400). At the same time, students select two advisers from the Program in Visual Arts, and complete the Program 2 Adviser Approval Form. The creative junior independent work is done in consultation with the student's advisers and also with the general visual arts faculty in "open studio" meetings. The advisers' spring-term grade for junior independent work represents an evaluation of the entire year's studio work. The creative junior independent work is exhibited in a group show at the beginning of the senior fall semester.

Senior Independent Work. By the beginning of the senior year, students must select three advisers, including one from the Department of Art and Archaeology faculty, and complete the Program 2 Adviser Approval Form. The senior independent work is a major studio project completed by the end of the spring term, which is done in consultation with the student's advisers, and also with the general visual arts faculty in four "open studio" meetings. Students present their work in an exhibition at the end of the year, usually in a two-person show with another certificate or Program 2 student. The grade for the senior independent work represents an evaluation of the entire year's studio work and is the average of two grades: (1) the average of the grades given by the student's three advisers; and (2) the average of the grades given by the rest of the Program in Visual Arts faculty who view the senior exhibition.

Senior Departmental Examination

The senior examination takes the form of a one-hour critical discussion of the senior independent work with the student's three advisers at the end of the spring term, normally at the time of the student's exhibition. The grade for the oral examination is the average of the three grades given by the advisers participating in the examination.

Program 3. Archaeology

This program brings together faculty from a variety of departments in a major that combines academic training in archaeology with practical experience on excavations (participation in a summer excavation project is normally required). The program is designed to combine broad comparative study across cultures with specialization in the area of a student's particular interest. Individually tailored courses of study are arranged with the advice and approval of the program adviser.

Prerequisites

Any two archaeology or related courses approved by the program adviser.

Program of Study

A total of 10 courses in the Department of Art and Archaeology or approved cognates. These must include ART 400 (Junior Seminar), ART 401 (Archaeology Seminar), and four more Department of Art and Archaeology courses approved by the program adviser in four of the following five areas: the Americas; Egypt/Ancient Near East; Mediterranean/European (Greek, Roman, Byzantine, etc.); Islamic; and Central Asia/East Asia. The remaining four courses, which need not be in the Department of Art and Archaeology, must include two courses in the history, art, and/or literature of a single culture. A student with a special interest in classical antiquity, for example, might take courses in the Department of Classics. Other possibilities include certain courses in religion, anthropology, geology, chemistry, and materials science/conservation. Students are strongly encouraged to acquire both a modern and an ancient language appropriate to their fields of special interest. The program adviser may approve up to two language courses as cognates, provided that they are at a level higher than is required to satisfy the basic University language requirement.

Cognates. No cognates are accepted for the four courses taken in the Department of Art and Archaeology.

Independent Work

Junior Independent Work. Same as for Program 1, except that the two junior papers should be on archaeological subjects.

Senior Independent Work. Same as for Program 1, except that the thesis should be on an archaeological subject.

Senior Departmental Examination

Same as for Program 1.


Courses


ART 100 Introduction to the History of Art: Ancient to Medieval   Fall LA

A survey of Western art from ancient civilizations through the medieval period with emphasis on the major artists and works of art. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 101 Introduction to the History of Art: Renaissance to Contemporary   Spring LA

A survey of Western art from the Renaissance to the present with emphasis on the major artists and works of art. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Heuer

ART 102 An Introduction to the History of Architecture   Not offered this year LA

A survey of architectural history in the West, from ancient Egypt to 20th-century America, stressing a critical approach to architectural form through the analysis of context, expressive content, function, structure, style, and theory. Discussion will focus on key monuments and readings that have shaped the history of architecture. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Pinto

ART 105 Lab in Conservation of Art (see CEE 105)

ART 200 The Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East and Egypt (also NES 205)   Not offered this year LA

The art and archaeology of the ancient Near East and Egypt from the end of the prehistoric period, ca. 3000 B.C., to the beginning of the Iron Age, ca. 650 B.C. Focus on the rise of complex societies and the attendant development of architectural and artistic forms that express the needs and aspirations of these societies. Occasional readings in original texts in translation will supplement the study of art and architecture. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 202 Greek Art: Ideal Realism   Not offered this year LA

A study of Greek sculpture and painting from the Late Geometric period (760 B.C.) to the end of the Hellenistic period (31 B.C.). Emphasis on the interaction of abstraction and naturalism. Readings include the ancient poets, tragedians, and historians to place the art in its intellectual and social context. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 203 Roman Art   Spring LA

Roman painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts from the early Republic to the late Empire, focusing upon the official monuments of Rome itself and the civic and private art of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Emphasis on historical representation, imperial propaganda, portraiture, narrative technique, and classical art theory. Two lectures, one preceptorial. H. Meyer

ART 205 Medieval Art in Europe (also HLS 205)   Fall LA

The art of Europe from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. Emphasis on the effects of cultural, religious, and political change on artistic production. Works treated include the Lindisfarne Gospels, the Bayeux Tapestry, Chartres Cathedral, and the Ste. Chapelle. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Trkulja

ART 206 Byzantine Art and Architecture (also HLS 206)   Not offered this year LA

Art and architecture of the Eastern Mediterranean and Eastern Europe ca. 600-1500. The course will focus on the art of the Byzantine Empire and its capital, Constantinople, and on its broad sphere of cultural influence (Russia, Armenia, Georgia, Sicily, Venice, Serbia, Bulgaria, Rumania). An examination of principal factors that shaped the artistic legacy of eastern Christendom during the Middle Ages. Offered in alternate years. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 209 Between Renaissance and Revolution: Baroque Art in Europe   Spring LA

Painting and sculpture in Europe from the 1580s to the 1790s. The great figures (e.g., Caravaggio, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Velazquez, Bernini, et. al.), major artistic innovations (still life, genre, landscape), and stylistic developments (e.g., rococo, Neoclassicism) seen in relation to intellectual, political, religious, and social change. Painting and sculpture in Europe from the 1580s to the 1790s. Includes the study of actual works of art in the museum in Princeton and elsewhere. Two lectures, one preceptorial. T. Kaufmann

ART 210 Italian Renaissance Painting and Sculpture   Fall LA

A selective survey, 1260-1600, allowing discussion of themes such as patronage; functions; materials and techniques; emulation as motivation; social, political, and economic issues; aesthetics; and the professions of the artist and of the art historian. Artists treated include Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Bellini, Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 211 Major Figures in American Art   Not offered this year LA

A selective overview of key figures from the 18th to the 20th century, with each lecture devoted to a single painter, architect, or sculptor as representative of significant themes in the history of American art. Among the artists considered are Copley, Jefferson, Cole, Homer, Eakins, Richardson, Saint-Gaudens, Olmsted, and O'Keeffe. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Offered in alternate years. R. DeLue

ART 212 Neoclassicism through Impressionism   Fall LA

A broad study of European painting and sculpture from the French Revolution to 1900 with special attention to art's relationship to social, economic, and cultural changes. Lectures will explore a range of themes including art and revolution, the rise of landscape, shifting conceptions of realism, and the birth of "modernism" and the avant-garde. Emphasis on major figures including David, Canova, Goya, Ingres, Turner, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Rodin, Van Gogh, and Cézanne. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 213 Modernist Art: 1900 to 1950   Fall LA

A critical study of the major movements, paradigms, and documents of modernist art from fauvism to art brut. Among the topics covered are primitivism, abstraction, collage, the readymade, machine aesthetics, photographic reproduction, the art of the insane, artists in political revolution, anti-modernism. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Offered in alternate years. C. Lang

ART 214 Contemporary Art: 1950 to the Present   Spring LA

A critical study of the major movements, paradigms, and documents of postwar art--abstract-expressionist, pop, minimalist, conceptual, process and performance, site-specific, etc. Special attention to crucial figures (e.g., Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Robert Smithson) and problems (e.g., "the neo-avant-garde," popular culture, feminist theory, political controversies, "postmodernism"). Two lectures, one preceptorial. Offered in alternate years. Staff

ART 215 Early Chinese Art and Archaeology   Not offered this year LA

A survey of Chinese art and archaeology from the Neolithic through the Han Dynasty. Recent archaeological finds are studied (and sometimes compared with Near Eastern counterparts) for the light they throw on the character of early Chinese civilization. Specific topics to be considered include the interaction between technique and design in bronze casting and jade carving. Three lectures, one preceptorial. R. Bagley

ART 216 Chinese Painting   Not offered this year LA

Thematic introduction to the role of painting in Chinese cultural history, with attention to the interaction of stylistic standards, materials, and techniques; the impact of regional geographies on landscape painting; the influence of class, gender, and social behavior on figure painting; the engagement of art with traditional philosophies and 20th-century socialism; and the shape of time in art-historical development. Three lectures. J. Silbergeld

ART 217 The Arts of Japan (also EAS 217)   Fall LA

Surveys the arts of Japan from the pre-historic period through the present day. Painting, sculpture, and architecture form the core of study. Examines the critical role of other forms, including calligraphy, lacquer, and ceramics. Takes close account of the broader cultural and historical contexts in which art was made. Topics include the ongoing tension in Japanese art between the foreign and the indigenous, the role of ritual in Japan's visual arts, the re-uses of the past, the changing loci of patronage, and the formats and materials of Japanese art. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Watsky

ART 219 Northern Renaissance Art   Not offered this year LA

The course surveys painting, prints, and sculpture in the Netherlands, Germany, and France from about 1350-1550. With emphasis on the work of major figures such as Van Eyck, Bosch, Dürer, and Bruegel, the course will consider changing circumstances of artistic production, function, iconography, and patronage. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Heuer

ART 221 Art of Hispania (also LAS 221)   Not offered this year LA

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in the Spanish-speaking world from 1492 to 1810. The great flowering of Spanish art, as represented by such figures as El Greco, Velázquez, and Goya, in its cultural and historical context, including developments in Latin America. Some attention to the art of Portugal. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Offered in alternate years. T. Kaufmann

ART 230 Early Islamic Art and Architecture (also NES 230)   Not offered this year LA

A survey of art in the Islamic world from 600 through 1200. The course examines the formation of Islamic art and its roots in the art of late antiquity. Emphasis will be on the development of various types of religious and secular architecture and their decoration (wall-painting, carved stucco and wood, mosaic and epigraphy) in the central regions of the early Islamic world. Topics such as textiles, metalwork, and ceramics will be considered. Two lectures, one preceptorial. T. Leisten

ART 232 The Arts of the Islamic World (also NES 232)   Fall LA

A survey of the architecture and the arts of various Islamic cultures between northern Africa and the Indian subcontinent from the seventh to the 20th century. Emphasis will be on major monuments of religious and secular architecture, architectural decoration, calligraphy, and painting. Background in Islam or Middle Eastern languages is not a prerequisite. Two lectures, one preceptorial. T. Leisten

ART 242 The Experience of Modernity: A Survey of Modern Architecture in the West (also ARC 242/CEE 242)   Spring LA

An analysis of the emergence of modern architecture from the late 19th century to World War II, in light of new methodologies. The course will focus not only on major monuments but also on issues of gender, class, and ethnicity to provide a more pluralistic perspective on the experience of modernity. Two lectures, one preceptorial. E. da Costa Meyer

ART 248 History of Photography   Not offered this year LA

A survey of photography from its multiple inventions in the early 19th century to its omnipresence (and possible obsolescence) in the 21st. Themes will include photography's power to define the "real"; its emulation and eventual transformation of the traditional fine arts; and its role in the construction of personal and collective memories. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. McCauley

ART 256 Writing as Art   Not offered this year LA

In China, Japan, the Islamic world, and several other cultures, writing is ranked as the highest of the visual arts, far above painting, sculpture, even architecture. The forms taken by beautiful writing are at least as diverse as the writing systems that underlie them: think of Egyptian writing, Chinese calligraphy, and Roman monumental inscriptions. This course will introduce the world's major calligraphic traditions and examine the functions of beautiful writing, the reasons for its existence and prestige, and the factors that shape styles of writing. One three-hour seminar. R. Bagley

ART 262 Structures and the Urban Environment (see CEE 262A)

ART 266 Introduction to Pre-Columbian Art   Not offered this year LA

General survey of the indigenous civilizations of North America, Central America, and South America. The goals are to demonstrate methods and techniques employed by art historians working in this area to study the past, and to examine how art history, archaeology, and ethnohistory contribute to the interdisciplinary study of ancient peoples. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 270 Photography and Society   Not offered this year LA

What is the role of photography in contemporary society? By looking at familiar photographic forms, ranging from commercial portraits, ID cards, family albums, and fashion and advertising photography to newspaper and magazine illustrations, this course explores the diverse ways that photographs have come to define and challenge the "real." Students will talk with professionals in the fields of journalism and fashion, examine recent controversies over digital manipulation and politically charged photos, and consider the historical sources of contemporary styles. One three-hour seminar. A. McCauley

ART 300 Greek Archaeology of the Bronze Age   Not offered this year LA

A study of the culture of Greece and the Aegean from the Early Bronze Age to the eighth century B.C. Special emphasis is placed on the Minoan-Mycenaean civilization, the Dark Ages of the early first millennium, and the age of Homer. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Offered in alternate years. Staff

ART 301 The Art of the Iron Age: The Near East and Early Greece   Not offered this year LA

The course will focus on the formation of new artistic traditions in the ancient Near East and late-period Egypt after 1000 B.C.E. and then investigate their interrelationships with early Greece and the controversial theories of modern scholars of the dependence of early Greece on the ancient Near East. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

ART 302 Myths in Greek Art   Not offered this year LA

The changing representation of mythological and religious themes in Greek painting and sculpture from the Late Geometric to the Hellenistic period. Emphasis on the development of specific cycles of myths, with reference to their historical context. Readings in ancient sources in translation and modern criticism. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Offered in alternate years. Staff

ART 306 Classical Athens: Art and Institutions (also CLA 306)   Not offered this year LA

An examination of the culture and institutions of classical Athens, its buildings, monuments, and works of art, set against the historical background of the city's growth. Aspects of government, religious festivals, society, and daily life are investigated. The archaeological record is enriched by study of ancient historical sources in translation. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 308 Roman Cities and Countryside: Republic to Empire   Spring LA

Roman urban and suburban architecture throughout the Roman provinces from the late Republic to late Empire, focusing upon the Romanization of the provinces from Britain in the northwest to Arabia in the southeast. Town planning, imperial monuments, villas and sanctuaries, domestic and public architecture, and interior decoration considered. One three-hour class. H. Meyer

ART 315 Medieval Architecture (also ARC 315)   Not offered this year LA

Historical patterns of development in Western European architecture between 300 and 1300: Early Christian through Gothic, with emphasis on Romanesque and Gothic innovations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 318 Medieval Manuscript Illumination (also HUM 318)   Not offered this year LA

A technical and historical introduction to manuscript illumination from the invention of the codex to the advent of the printed book. Topics include the history of script and ornament, genres of illuminated manuscripts, the varying relations between text and image, owners of books, circumstances of production. Extensive work with Princeton's manuscript collections. Two 90-minute classes. Offered in alternate years. Staff

ART 319 Italian Trecento Art   Not offered this year LA

Painting and sculpture of the formative years of the early Renaissance in Italy (ca. 1250-1400) with emphasis on the cultural, social, and religious concerns that found expression in art. Topics include the relationship between art and piety, the effect of the Black Death, and the rediscovery of the classical heritage. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 320 Rome, the Eternal City (also ARC 320)   Fall LA

The fabric and image of the city seen in planning, architecture, and the works of artists and writers. Attention to the city as an ideal and an example, from its foundation to the present, with emphasis on major periods. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Pinto

ART 328 History of Architectural Theory (see ARC 308)

ART 331 Weimar Germany: Painting, Photography, Film (see GER 370)

ART 332 The Landscape of Allusion: Garden and Landscape Architecture, 1450-1750 (also ARC 332)   Not offered this year LA

The concept of nature from the Renaissance through the 18th century as seen in European gardens and landscape architecture. Major consideration will be given to the Italian villa-garden complex, the French classical garden, and the English romantic garden and park as evidence of large-scale planning. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Pinto

ART 333 Renaissance and Baroque Architecture (also ARC 333)   Not offered this year LA

European architecture from 1420 to the mid-18th century with particular emphasis on its historical and social background. The various architectural movements--Renaissance, baroque, and rococo--are studied in terms of important architects and buildings especially of Italy, France, and England. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Pinto

ART 334 The Renaissance (see COM 314)

ART 337 Court, Cloister, and City: Art and Architecture in Central and Eastern Europe (also GER 337)   Not offered this year LA

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Germany, and Russia, ca. 1450-1800. Special emphasis is placed on the changing roles of court, city, cloister, and aristocracy and the relation of local styles to international trends, including art elsewhere in Europe. One three-hour seminar. Offered in alternate years. T. Kaufmann

ART 343 Topics in 19th-Century Art (also WOM 350)   Spring LA

An often interdisciplinary study of themes and problems in 19th-century art with special attention to recent writing in the field. Possible topics include: the persistence of realism, Impressionism and its aftermath, shifting representations of masculinity and femininity, and the formation of the first European avant-gardes. The course may also center on a particular artistic medium or geographical location. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 344 Topics in 20th-Century Art   Fall LA

An often interdisciplinary study of themes and problems in 20th-century art with special attention to recent writing in the field. Possible topics include: models of abstraction, critiques of the traditional mediums of art, artistic responses to technological transformation and/or political revolution, and artistic explorations of the unconscious. One three-hour seminar. C. Lang

ART 346 Architecture and the Visual Arts (see ARC 302)

ART 348 Masters and Movements of 20th-Century Photography   Not offered this year LA

By focusing on six major figures (Stieglitz, Weston, Moholy-Nagy, Evans, Frank, Sherman), this course examines the ways that photography was transformed from a poor stepchild of the fine arts to a staple of museum exhibitions. Topics will include the impact of abstraction on photography; the interactions between art photography and the new print and cinematic mass media; and the development of photographic collections and criticism. Two 90-minute classes A. McCauley

ART 350 Chinese Cinema   Fall LA

Thematic studies in Chinese film (Republic, People's Republic, Taiwan, Hong Kong), from the 1930s to the present with emphasis on recent years, viewed in relation to traditional and modern Chinese visual arts and literature, colonialism and globalism, Communist politics, gender and family values, ethnicity and regionalism, melodrama and the avant-garde, the cinematic market, artistic censorship, and other social issues. One three-hour seminar, one evening viewing session. J. Silbergeld

ART 351 Traditional Chinese Architecture (also ARC 351)   Not offered this year LA

Thematic introduction to traditional Chinese architecture, urban design, and garden building, with attention to principles and symbolism of siting and design; building techniques; modularity of structures and interchangeability of palace, temple, tomb, and domestic design; regional variation. Two 90-minute classes. J. Silbergeld

ART 354 The Early Modern Print   Spring LA

Surveys the history of prints in Europe and the United States from 1400 to the present. It will combine two main approaches: first, the distinctive history of printmaking, including origins, evolution of techniques, and the political, religious, and cultural functions of prints; and second, individual artistic developments, with emphasis on the work of major printmakers, iconography, and formal innovations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Heuer

ART 366 Ancient Arts of Mexico (also LAS 366)   Not offered this year LA

Detailed examination of the Pre-Columbian arts of the indigenous civilizations of Mexico. The first part of the course will examine the architecture, monumental art, and craft art of the Aztecs and their contemporaries, the Huaztecs, Tarascans, Mixtecs, Zapotecs, and Mayas. The rest of the course is designed as a survey of the major Mexican art traditions that preceded them. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

ART 370 History of American Art to 1900   Not offered this year LA

An introduction to the history of art in the United States from the colonial period to 1900. Works of art will be examined in terms of their cultural, social, intellectual, and historical contexts. Students will consider artistic practices as they intersect with other fields, including science and literature. Topics include the visual culture of natural history, fashioning the self, race and representation, landscape and nation, art and the Civil War, gender politics, art and medicine, and realism and deception. Two lectures, one preceptorial. R. DeLue

ART 371 History of American Art, 1900 to the Present   Not offered this year LA

An introduction to the history of American art from 1900 to the present. Artists and works of art will be examined in terms of their cultural, social, intellectual, and historical contexts. Students will consider artistic practices as they intersect with other fields, including science and literature. Topics include the modern metropolis, art and social reform, the Harlem Renaissance, early film, identity politics, abstract art, the machine age, post-modernism, and globalization. Visits to the Princeton University Art Museum will be an integral part of this course. Two lectures, one preceptorial. R. DeLue

ART 373 History of African American Art (also AAS 373)   Not offered this year LA

An introduction to the history of African American art and visual culture from the colonial period to the present. Artists and works of art will be considered in terms of their social, intellectual, and historical contexts. Students will consider artistic practices as they intersect with other cultural spheres, including science, politics, religion, and literature. Topics and readings will be drawn from the field of art history as well as from other areas of inquiry, such as cultural studies, critical race theory, and the history of the Atlantic world. Two lectures, one preceptorial. R. DeLue

ART 390 Modernist Colloquies: Photography and Literature (see GER 373)

ART 391 Art in Germany Since 1960 (see GER 371)

ART 392 Issues in Contemporary Art (see VIS 392)

ART 400 Junior Seminar   Fall LA

An introduction to a range of methods and texts in the history of the discipline. The junior seminar is required of all art and archaeology concentrators. One three-hour seminar. C. Heuer, A. McCauley

ART 401 Archaeology Seminar   Spring LA

Introduces students to the methods and thinking of archaeologists and prehistorians. Topics include the concept of prehistory; ethnographic analogy and the interpretation of material remains; relating material culture to texts; schemes of cultural interpretation; and how to read an excavation report. This seminar is required of art and archaeology program 3 concentrators. One three-hour seminar. Staff

ART 410 Seminar. Greek Art (also HLS 410)   Fall LA

Topics of Greek art and architecture that will normally deal with the Hellenistic period (323-31 B.C.). Depending on student interest, special subjects may also be treated in relation to the Hellenistic period, such as classicism, or the course may concentrate on thematic studies, such as architectural sculpture. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a course in ancient art or instructor's permission. Offered in alternate years. Staff

ART 420 Seminar in Asian Art   Not offered this year LA

A topic in Chinese or Japanese art, explored in depth. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in Asian art or the instructor's permission. Offered in alternate years. Y. Shimizu

ART 423 Landscape Art in China   Fall LA

A course about Chinese concepts of nature and human nature, theories and traditions of landscape art. Weekly consideration of such themes as replicating and transforming the landscape; submission to/control of nature; landscape as political allegory; pilgrimage and exile; gardens and artists' studios; landscape magic in ancient China; endangered pandas, power dams, and the technology of modern art. One three-hour seminar. J. Silbergeld

ART 424 Virtue, Tyranny, and the Political Functions of Chinese Painting   Not offered this year LA

The patrons of Chinese painting and many of its leading artists were politicians by profession, both royal and commoner-bureaucrats, and much of their art was designed to fulfill political functions: propaganda, moral self-cultivation, self-advertisement and self-consolation, expressions of support, resistance, and resignation. Half of the course covers premodern China, half covers the 20th century. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in Chinese art history or instructor's permission. J. Silbergeld

ART 425 The Japanese Print   Spring LA

An examination of Japanese woodblock prints from the 17th through the 19th century. This seminar considers the formal and technical aspects of woodblock prints, and the varied subject matter, including the "floating world" of prostitution and the theater, the Japanese landscape, and the burgeoning urban centers. Students will explore the links between literature and prints, especially the re-working of elite classical literary themes in popular prints. Prerequisite: at least one course in art history or Japanese studies, or permission of instructor. One three-hour seminar. A. Watsky

ART 430 Seminar. Medieval Art (also HLS 430)   Not offered this year LA

Topics in medieval art and/or architecture. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in the art of this period or instructor's permission. Staff

ART 438 Representation of Faith and Power: Islamic Architecture in Its Context (also NES 428)   Not offered this year LA

The seminar explores the means by which messages of political and religious content were conveyed in Islamic architecture. Selected key monuments or ensembles will be discussed on the basis of their specific historical and religious setting. Special attention will be given to the problem of symbolism in Islamic architecture. T. Leisten

ART 440 Seminar. Renaissance Art (also HLS 441)   Not offered this year LA

Topics in 15th- and 16th-century art. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in the art of this period or instructor's permission. C. Heuer

ART 442 Seminar. Old Master Drawings   Not offered this year LA

The study of techniques, functions, and connoisseurship of drawings, and their place in the interpretation of the history of art. Drawings ca. 1400-1800 will be the major objects considered. Extensive use of the resources of the art museum. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in Renaissance or baroque art or instructor's permission. T. Kaufmann

ART 443 Global Exchange in Art and Architecture (also LAS 443)   Fall LA

Examines the global exchange in art and architecture between and among the continents of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas in the period 1492-1800. The course focuses on the geographical, historical, religious, anthropological, and aesthetic aspects of issues such as cultural encounters, diffusion, transculturation, regionalism, and related topics. One three-hour seminar. T. Kaufmann

ART 445 Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture in Early-Modern Europe (also ARC 445)   Fall LA

Topics will focus on major figures, such as Palladio, Wren, and Piranesi; centers, such as Rome and Venice; or themes, such as architectural theory, the legacy of classical antiquity, and the villa. One three-hour seminar. J. Pinto

ART 446 Seminar. Northern European Art of the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance   Not offered this year LA

This seminar will address various aspects of northern European art during the period late Middle Ages through early Renaissance. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in the art of this period or instructor's permission. C. Heuer

ART 448 Seminar. 17th- and 18th-Century Art   Not offered this year LA

Topics in 17th- and 18th-century art and architecture. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in the art of this period or instructor's permission. Staff

ART 450 Seminar. 19th-Century European Art (also ECS 450)   Not offered this year LA

The seminar will focus in depth on a specific aspect of art, history, theory, and criticism in Europe between 1789 and 1914. Possible topics include French painting and its critics, portraiture and sociability, shifting conceptions of realism and naturalism, the onset of modernism, and representations of interior space. Prerequisites: a course in the art of this period or permission of the instructor. Visits to area museums. One three-hour seminar. B. Alsdorf

ART 452 Seminar. Modernism: The Ends of Art   Not offered this year LA

Does art have an essential nature? Do different mediums--painting, sculpture, photography, film, television, video--have specific ontologies that demand specific methods? How is the autonomy of art debated, and why is this debate so central to modernism? With images and texts by primary artists and critics, the seminar will investigate the "ends" of art in the sense of posited goals and presumed deaths. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a course in the art of this period or instructor's permission. Staff

ART 454 Seminar. History of Photography   Not offered this year LA

Topics on the aesthetic and stylistic development of photography, including the study of movements and related critical theory, and on the artistic achievement of particular photographers. One three-hour seminar. A. McCauley

ART 456 Seminar. Contemporary Art   Not offered this year LA

Topics in contemporary painting, sculpture, or criticism in Europe and America since World War II. Prerequisite: a course in the art of this period or instructor's permission. H. Foster

ART 458 Seminar. Modern Architecture (also ARC 458)   Spring LA

A study of some of the major themes and movements of modern architecture from the late 19th century to the present day. Students will be encouraged to examine the social and political context, to probe the architects' intellectual background, and consider issues of class and gender in their relation to architectural and urban form. One three-hour seminar. E. da Costa Meyer

ART 461 Great Cities of the Greek World (see HLS 461)

ART 463 American Art and Visual Culture   Not offered this year LA

An in-depth exploration of the history, theory, and interpretation of American art and visual culture from the colonial period to the present day. Topics covered will include race and representation in American art and culture; art and science; landscape art and theory; the Harlem Renaissance; and the art and artists of the Stieglitz circle. Visits to the Princeton University Art Museum as well as to other area museums (such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York) will be an integral part of this course. One three-hour seminar. R. DeLue