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Program in Dance

Director

Susan Marshall

Executive Committee

Jill S. Dolan, English, Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater

Jeffrey Eugenides, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

Su Friedrich, Lewis Center for the Arts, Visual Arts

Chang-rae Lee, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

Susan Marshall, Lewis Center for the Arts

Paul B. Muldoon, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

Joyce Carol Oates, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

James Richardson, English, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

Joseph S. Scanlan, Lewis Center for the Arts, Visual Arts

P. Adams Sitney, Lewis Center for the Arts, Visual Arts

Susan Wheeler, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

Edmund V. White, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

Stacy E. Wolf, Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater

Professor

Susan Marshall

Senior Lecturer

Rebecca J. Lazier


The Program in Dance, part of the Lewis Center for the Arts, familiarizes students with creative, performative, and analytical approaches to dance through exposure to professional choreographers, dancers, critics, and scholars. While pursuing a liberal arts education, students have the opportunity to undertake demanding, studio-based courses in dance with first-class dance professionals. The program provides advanced courses for the pre-professional dancer in addition to creating opportunities for students who have never danced. The creation of original work, both choreographic and written, is emphasized alongside rigorous technical training. The program supports multiple performance opportunities each year, ranging from full professional productions in the Berlind Theatre with choreography by faculty, guests, and students, to site-specific interdisciplinary thesis projects and independent experimental work. Students with a special, perhaps even a career interest in dance, can choose to earn a program certificate.

The curricular wing of the program offers courses in modern, contemporary, ballet, experimental and African dance techniques, repertory, and choreography, as well as in dance history, analysis, and criticism. The program also provides special interdepartmental performance collaborations as well as yearly interdisciplinary opportunities with the Atelier program. In addition, co-curricular ballet and modern classes are offered on a daily basis. Yearly short- and long-term visiting artists enhance curricular offerings by choreographing original work and staging the work of seminal choreographers for dance concerts, or by offering special workshops, seminars, and master classes.

Admission to the Program

Program courses are open to all undergraduates. Past experience in dance is not a requirement for admission to introductory courses, but the program also offers sufficient intermediate and advanced classes, as well as co-curricular opportunities, such that the serious student will, upon graduation, be prepared for advanced study in the field.

Program of Study

A certificate from the Program in Dance will be awarded to students who successfully complete a substantial amount of work in the practical and academic areas of the discipline. Students should enroll in the certificate program during the second term of the sophomore year, but no later than the start of the second term of the junior year. At least two of the required courses, including one from the program listing, should be completed before enrollment in the certificate program.

To obtain a certificate in dance, students need to complete: (1) four studio courses above the introductory level, two must be performance courses: DAN 319/419/420 or Atelier; (2) one course in dance history and criticism: DAN 321 Special Topics in Dance History, Criticism, and Aesthetics offered spring semester only; (3) two additional performances during the junior and/or senior year with a guest choreographer or in a dance-based Atelier; (4) two semesters of twice weekly co-curricular ballet or modern class; and (5) 20 hours of technical work in assisting the dance program's productions. Students have the option of completing an independent creative project in dance as part of the program.

Students are encouraged to self-design programs with an interdisciplinary focus. All substitutions of requirements will be determined in consultation with the program diector.

Advanced Creative Work. The program offers all students the opportunity to do advanced creative work under the supervision of its faculty. These projects may be pursued as extracurricular activities, or they may be used to fulfill the requirement for independent work in the certificate program. With permission of the student's department of concentration, such a project may also satisfy one of the requirements for independent work in the department, in which case it must consist of or be accompanied by written work, such as a scholarly or critical evaluation. Past independent projects have included performances in the Berlind Theatre, site specific productions in Chancellor Green Rotunda, and video installations. Often, senior certificate dancers choose dance to be the topic of their departmental thesis. For example an anthropology concentrator chose as her thesis subject Sri Lankan dance, a comparative literature thesis explored links between poetry and dance theories, and other certificate students have looked at dance from the viewpoint of computer science, mathematics, neuroscience, and music.

Certificate of Proficiency

Students who fulfill the requirements of the program receive a certificate of proficiency in dance upon graduation.


Courses


DAN 209 Introduction to Movement and Dance   Fall, Spring LA

A mix of movement techniques, improvisation, and composition. Students with no previous dance training will learn how to recognize their own movement potential and how to build their own dances. The essential principles and evolution of 20th-century modern and post-modern dance will be studied through readings and viewings of live and videotaped dance performances. Two two-hour classes. E. Weeks

DAN 211 The American Dance Experience and Africanist Dance Practices (also AAS 211)   Spring LA

A studio course introducing students to American dance aesthetics and practice, with a focus on how American dance has been influenced by African American choreographers and dancers. An ongoing study of movement practices from traditional African dances and those of the African diaspora, touching on American jazz dance, modern dance, and American ballet. Studio work will be complemented by readings, video viewings, guest speakers, and dance studies. Two two-hour classes. D. Harvey Salaam

DAN 219 Modern Dance: Beginning Technique and Choreography   Fall LA

The practice of primarily modern dance and some ballet techniques designed to further expand movement vocabulary and expressive range. Students will be introduced to the influence of Modernism on choreographic practices through structured improvisations, choreographic studies, viewing videotapes, and readings. Two two-hour classes in technique, one two-hour class in choreography. Staff

DAN 220 Modern Dance: Beginning/Intermediate Technique and Choreography   Spring LA

The practice of primarily modern dance and some ballet techniques designed to further expand movement vocabulary and expressive range. Students will be introduced to the influence of Modernism on choreographic practices through structured improvisations, choreographic studies, viewing videotapes, and readings. Two two-hour classes in technique, one two-hour class in choreography. Staff

DAN 304 Special Topics in Contemporary Practice (also THR 304)   Fall LA

Offers students the opportunity to gain a working knowledge of the ways in which dance, dance/theater, and body-based art are created and performed today. Primarily a studio course that stresses learning through doing. Students will have the opportunity to work with leading experimental creators. Topics, prerequisites, and formats will vary from year to year. Staff

DAN 309 Modern Dance: Intermediate Technique and Choreography   Spring LA

To understand and experience contemporary dance through technique, choreography, and reading. In technique, students will be encouraged to expand movement range and increase technical mastery as related to modern and contemporary dance practices. In choreography, students will be encouraged to create dances that articulate their independent vision in solo and group works. Readings about and viewings of live and videotaped dance from mid-20th century dance will supplement studio work and expand knowledge of historical and contemporary trends in the arts. Two two-hour classes in technique, one two-hour class in choreography. Staff

DAN 319 Dance Performance Workshop: Intermediate Repertory and Choreography   Fall LA

In the repertory component, students expand their understanding of the creative process, their technical ability, and expressive range through the development of an original dance, or reconstruction, created in collaboration with a faculty member. The choreography component guides students through improvisation to explore theme, concepts, and structures to develop a personal movement style. Students read essays about and view videos of major figures in 20th-century dance. Two two-hour repertory classes, one two-hour choreography class. Staff

DAN 321 Special Topics in Dance History, Criticism, and Aesthetics   Spring LA

Dance as a theatrical art form and/or a social practice. Topics might include a study of dance as an expression of personal, aesthetic, religious, social, and/or political concerns. Classes will be augmented by film, videos, music, guest speakers, occasional demonstrations, and studio work. One three-hour seminar. Staff

DAN 409 Contemporary Dance: Advanced Technique and Choreography   Spring LA

Advanced dance technique and choreography, with an emphasis on contemporary practices. In technique, students will be challenged to expand their movement range and increase their mastery in ways required by today's dance world. In choreography, students will explore the new territory pioneered by leading choreographers. Selected readings and viewings of live and videotaped dance from the late 20th century will supplement studio work and expand knowledge of contemporary trends in the arts. Two two-hour classes in technique, one two-hour class in choreography. Staff

DAN 419 Dance Performance Workshop: Advanced Repertory and Choreography   Fall LA

Students will master the performance of a technically advanced choreographic work with the aim to further challenge their technical expertise, expressive range, and stylistic clarity. Students will also create choreography infusing movement invention with ideas informed by historical and contemporary dance practices. Two two-hour classes in repertory and one two-hour class in choreography. Staff

DAN 420 Chamber Dance: Repertory and Choreography   Fall LA

This course covers the study and performance of seminal historical and contemporary chamber dances ranging from solos to septets. It will emphasize performance techniques encouraging rich, subtle, and stylistically accurate renditions of the repertoire while fostering intelligent and imaginative artistic interpretations. Student choreography will be geared toward the creation of small ensembles; the study of existing master works will be done by viewing videotapes of the dance literature, attending live concerts, and reading and analyzing historical works. Two two-hours classes in repertory, one two-house class in choreography. S. Marshall

DAN 431 Approaches to Ballet: Technique and Repertory   Spring LA

A studio course in ballet technique and repertory for advanced and high intermediate students. This course will consist of a pre-professional ballet class and learning selections of classical, neo-classical, and contemporary ballet. It will be divided into four units, each focusing on a different ballet choreographer such as: Marius Petipa, George Balanchine, Christopher Wheeldon, and Mark Morris. Students will be coached by internationally known guest artists to master and understand the diverse styles of each piece of repertory learned. Readings and viewings of live and videotaped performances. Three two-hour classes. T. Fehlandt

DAN 451 Princeton Atelier (see ATL 498)