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Program in South Asian Studies

Director

Isabelle Clark-Decès

Executive Committee

Zahid R. Chaudhary, English 

Isabelle Clark-Decès, Anthropology 

Ben Conisbee Baer, Comparative Literature 

Jonathan C. Gold, Religion 

Atul Kohli, Woodrow Wilson School, Politics 

Gyan Prakash, History 

Bhavani Raman, History 

Muhammad Q. Zaman, Near Eastern Studies, Religion 

Sits with Committee

Fauzia Farooqui, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Gary J. Hausman, Firestone Library

David S. Magier, Firestone Library

Karen McGuinness, Woodrow Wilson School

Zia Mian, Woodrow Wilson School


The Program in South Asian Studies, under the auspices of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, offers students the methodological and theoretical tools to study the political, economic, social, religious, literary, and cultural institutions of the region with particular focus on the modern history of India and Pakistan.

Hindi and Urdu. The Program in South Asian Studies offers a four-term sequence of language instruction in Hindi and Urdu. Completion of all four terms of either language will satisfy the University language requirement. The program emphasizes the skills of speaking, reading, and writing Hindi and Urdu, as well as the cultural context of South Asia. The program encourages students to take advantage of intensive summer language programs and of the numerous opportunities to study or travel in South Asia, including a semester or year abroad. For more information, contact the Program in South Asian Studies.

Admission to the Program

Students concentrating in any department may enter the certificate program with permission from the director. A student normally enters the program at the end of the sophomore year, although entrance in the fall of the junior year is not precluded. Students in the departments of anthropology, history, politics, religion, sociology, comparative literature, or the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs may find that their studies mesh particularly well with the requirements of the program. Concentrators in the Woodrow Wilson School will select South Asia as a field of concentration.

Program of Study

To obtain a certificate of proficiency, students must complete the normal requirements in their department of concentration as well as the following requirements of the program:

1. Four semesters of Hindi or Urdu, or demonstrated proficiency in Hindi, Urdu or another South Asian language through a program examination. See the program director to discuss using a language other than Hindi or Urdu to fulfill the program's language requirement.

2. At least one history course on South Asia in the Department of History.

3. At least two courses on South Asia in the Departments of Anthropology, Economics, or Politics, or the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Introduction to South Asian Cultures (ANT 217/SAS 217), offered by the Department of Anthropology in conjunction with the Program in South Asian Studies, is the gateway course for the study of South Asia.

4. At least one relevant course on South Asia in the Departments of Comparative Literature or Religion.

5. A senior thesis written in the student's department of concentration with a significant South Asian component. If there is no possibility for South Asian content in the senior thesis, students must write a separate piece of independent work focusing on South Asia; please consult with the program director.

Certificate of Proficiency

Students who complete the requirements of the program with satisfactory standing receive a certificate of proficiency in South Asian studies upon graduation.


Courses


HIN 101 Elementary Hindi and Urdu I (also URD 101)   Fall

An introduction to the skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing both Hindi and Urdu. Equal emphasis is placed on Hindi and Urdu, including writing systems, vocabulary and culture. Classroom activities include comprehension, grammar exercises, and conversation. No credit is given for HIN 101/URD 101 unless followed by HIN 102/URD 102. M. Natavar

HIN 102 Elementary Hindi and Urdu II   Spring

Provides the second semester of training in spoken and written Hindi and Urdu. The primary objective is to continue to increase understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Students acquire linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Classroom activities include comprehension, grammar exercises, role-plays, and conversation. Four classes. M. Natavar

HIN 105 Intermediate Hindi   Fall

Begins the second year of training in spoken and written Hindi. The primary objective is to continue to increase speaking, listening, reading, and writing proficiency of the language. Classroom activities include comprehension, grammar exercises, role-plays, songs, conversation, video viewing and production. Some attention to the cultural context of northern India. Depending on interest, Urdu script will also be taught. Three 90-minute classes. M. Natavar

HIN 107 Intermediate Hindi II   Spring

A continuation of the second year of intermediate Hindi language training, this course focuses on improving skills in the following areas: reading expository texts and extended narratives, writing descriptive informative texts of three to four page lengths, verbal communication on a range of topics, and expanding analytical understanding of the structure of the Hindi language. Quite a bit of attention to the cultural context of South Asia is given. M. Natavar

SAS 320 Science, Technology, and Society: South Asian Perspectives   Spring SA

Science, Technology, and Society (STS) is an interdisciplinary field that explores the social and historical shaping of science and technology. This course provides an introduction to STS with special focus on South Asia. We will consider questions such as: Is Bangalore simply an Indian version of Silicon Valley? Does outsourcing truly result in a 'flattening' of the world? What issues result from virtual migration and body shopping? What is the role of national identity in constructs of Hindu or Islamic science? How do South Asian electronic cultures relate to pirate modernity? Does cell phone culture vary globally? G. Hausman

SAS 337 Social Change in Contemporary India (see ANT 337)

URD 101 Elementary Hindi and Urdu I (see HIN 101)

URD 105 Intermediate Urdu I  

The course is a continuation of HIN-URD 102, concentrating on Urdu. Students beginning with intermediate proficiency in either Urdu or Hindi will be brought to an advanced level in Urdu in all four skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Urdu script will be introduced and emphasis will be placed on strengthening literacy skills. Cultural aspects will be integrated with instruction. Activities will be conducted in Urdu and classes will be interactive. F. Farooqui