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Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Dean

Christina H. Paxson

Associate Dean

Nolan M. McCarty

Departmental Representative

Brandice Canes-Wrone

Director of Graduate Studies

Christopher F. Chyba

Professor

R. Douglas Arnold, Public Affairs, Politics

Larry M. Bartels, Public Affairs, Politics

Gary J. Bass, International Affairs, Politics

Roland Benabou, Public Affairs, Economics

Alan S. Blinder, Economics, Public Affairs

Carles Boix, Public Affairs, Politics

Charles M. Cameron, Public Affairs, Politics

Brandice Canes-Wrone, Public Affairs, Politics

Anne C. Case, Public Affairs, Economics

Miguel A. Centeno, Sociology, International Affairs

Thomas J. Christensen, International Affairs, Politics

Christopher F. Chyba, International Affairs, Astrophysical Sciences

John McConnon Darley, Psychology, Public Affairs

Angus S. Deaton, International Affairs, Economics

Paul J. DiMaggio, Sociology, International Affairs

Christopher L. Eisgruber, Public Affairs, University Center for Human Values

Edward W. Felten, Computer Science, Public Affairs

Aaron L. Friedberg, International Affairs, Politics

Noreen J. Goldman, Public Affairs, Demography

Bryan Grenfell, Public Affairs, Ecology and Environmental Biology

Gene M. Grossman, International Affairs, Economics

G. John Ikenberry, International Affairs, Politics

Harold James, History, Public Affairs

Robert O. Keohane, Public and International Affairs

Atul Kohli, International Affairs, Politics

Stephen M. Kotkin, History, International Affairs

Alan B. Krueger, Public Affairs, Economics

Paul R. Krugman, International Affairs, Economics

David S. Lee, Public Affairs, Economics

John B. Londregan, International Affairs, Politics

Alexandre Mas, Public Affairs, Economics

Douglas S. Massey, Public Affairs, Sociology

Nolan M. McCarty, Public Affairs, Politics

Sara S. McLanahan, Public Affairs, Sociology

Helen V. Milner, International Affairs, Politics

Andrew M. Moravcsik, Politics, International Affairs

Michael Oppenheimer, International Affairs, Geosciences

Christina H. Paxson, Public Affairs, Economics

Stephen J. Redding, International Affairs, Economics

Uwe E. Reinhardt, Public Affairs, Economics

Thomas Romer, Public Affairs, Politics

Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, International Affairs, Economics

Cecilia E. Rouse, Public Affairs, Economics

Kim Lane Scheppele, Public Affairs, University Center for Human Values, Sociology

Eldar B. Shafir, Psychology, Public Affairs

Harold T. Shapiro, Public Affairs, Economics

Lee M. Silver, Molecular Biology, Public Affairs

Anne-Marie Slaughter, International Affairs, Politics

Paul E. Starr, Sociology, Public Affairs

Marta Tienda, Public Affairs, Sociology

James Trussell, Public Affairs, Economics

Frank N. von Hippel, Public and International Affairs

Keith A. Wailoo, History, Public Affairs

Mark W. Watson, Public Affairs, Economics

Lynn T. White III, International Affairs, Politics

Jennifer Widner, International Affairs, Politics

David S. Wilcove, Public Affairs, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Robert D. Willig, Public Affairs, Economics

Deborah J. Yashar, Public Affairs, Politics

Julian E. Zelizer, Public Affairs, History

Visiting Professor

Nannerl O. Keohane, Laurance S. Rockefeller Distinguished Visiting Professor of Public Affairs and the University Center for Human Values

Daniel C. Kurtzer, S. Daniel Abraham Visiting Professor in Middle East Policy Studies

Associate Professor

Elizabeth M. Armstrong, Sociology, Public Affairs

Christina Davis, International Affairs, Politics

Denise L. Mauzerall, Public and International Affairs, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Daniel M. Oppenheimer, Psychology, Public Affairs

Markus Prior, Public Affairs, Politics

Emily Pronin, Psychology, Public Affairs

Alexander T. Todorov, Psychology, Public Affairs

Assistant Professor

Daniela Campello, International Affairs, Politics

Sylvain Chassang, Public Affairs, Economics

Rafaela M. Dancygier, International Affairs, Politics

Jan DeLoecker, Public Affairs, Economics

Taryn L. Dinkelman, Public Affairs, Economics

Alexander Glaser, International Affairs, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Oleg Itskhoki, International Affairs, Economics

Ilyana Kuziemko, Public Affairs, Economics

Amy E. Lerman, Public Affairs, Politics

Elizabeth Levy Paluck, Psychology, Public Affairs

Grigore Pop-Eleches, Public Affairs, Politics

Georges Renier, Public Affairs, Sociology

Jacob N. Shapiro, International Affairs, Politics

Bradley R. Simpson, History, International Affairs

Keren Yarhi-Milo, International Affairs, Politics

Instructor

Alexander Hirsch, also Politics

Lecturer with Rank of Professor

Stanley N. Katz, Public and International Affairs

Adel A. Mahmoud, Molecular Biology

Lecturer

Barbara K. Bodine, Public and International Affairs

Joshua B. Bolten, Public and International Affairs

Edward Freeland, Public and International Affairs

James I. Gadsden, Public and International Affairs

Jean Baldwin Grossman, Public and International Affairs, Economics

Jeffrey S. Hammer, Public and International Affairs

Hugh B. Price, Public and International Affairs

Nathan Scovronick, Public and International Affairs

Silvia Weyerbrock, Public and International Affairs, Economics

Cesar Zucco, Public and International Affairs

Associated Faculty

João Biehl, Anthropology


Undergraduate Program. The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs is Princeton's memorial to a distinguished alumnus who was president of the University, governor of New Jersey, and president of the United States. The purpose of its undergraduate program is to carry forward Woodrow Wilson's interest in preparing students for leadership in public and international affairs.

The school is policy-oriented and emphasizes problem solving. The undergraduate program therefore stresses a course of study designed to familiarize students with social science and other disciplines applicable to the solution of public problems. For purposes of concentration in upperclass years, the school is the equivalent of a department of instruction.

Courses offered by the Woodrow Wilson School, as well as courses chosen from the economics, history, politics, sociology, and psychology departments, form the plan of study for undergraduates in the school. Policy seminars and the senior thesis are an integral part of the program. A final departmental exercise at the end of senior year tests the student's ability to integrate the senior thesis with other course work.

Policy Seminars. The most distinctive aspect of the undergraduate experience in the school are the junior policy seminars, called task forces or policy conferences. Woodrow Wilson School concentrators and certificate students enroll in one seminar each semester of their junior year. The policy conferences and task forces are very similar, except for their size; the conferences typically enroll 12 to 15 students, the task forces 6 to 10 students. The topics for the policy conferences are therefore somewhat broader.

In each of these exercises, juniors work together with a faculty director, one or two seniors, and often a graduate student toward proposing solutions to current problems in public and international affairs. Each junior conducts research on a topic carefully chosen to shed light upon the larger problem that is central to the group. Topics for independent work are therefore derived from the overall needs of the seminar. The tools students employ in their seminar are likewise a function of the topics to which the group's work is addressed. Woodrow Wilson School students are thus encouraged to use any intellectual discipline or skill that may help solve a problem.

In the seminars, faculty directors and guest lecturers provide background information, bibliographic references, and ideas on possible interviewees, but the students are expected to take responsibility for both the organization and the outcome of the exercise. The principal collective product is a final report with policy recommendations drafted after debates among the entire group.

Admission. Princeton sophomores may apply for admission to the Woodrow Wilson School for the final two years of their undergraduate education. Applications are reviewed and decisions made by a faculty committee. The curriculum and the procedure for admission are discussed with interested sophomores at a meeting held early in the spring term.

Each year the school admits 90 juniors, who are selected on the basis of their academic record and strength of preparation, the perspectives and experiences they would bring to the school, and their commitment to the study of public and international affairs. Among the 90 juniors admitted each year, most will be regular concentrators. A smaller number will be admitted as certificate students.

Information and Departmental Plan of Study

Prerequisites

There are no fixed course prerequisites for admission to the school. The Admissions Committee looks for candidates whose prior academic and nonacademic experience give evidence of interest in public or international affairs and the ability to do well in the courses and independent work comprising the school's curriculum. Before applying, a student should take social science, humanities, natural science, or engineering courses focusing on public concerns. Some knowledge of economics and of the workings of American political and social institutions, together with an acquaintance with the history of the United States and other nations, is strongly recommended. Applicants with interests in policy problems that demand technological expertise should demonstrate a strong background in science, engineering, or mathematics. While a student must fulfill the normal language requirement for graduation, there is no language requirement for admission to the school.

Program of Study

Upon admission, the student prepares a program for the junior and senior years in consultation with the program director. Departmental courses should form a coherent program of study, combining both techniques of analysis from the social science disciplines and courses that give the student substantive depth in a particular policy area.

Concentrators must take the core course, WWS 300 Democracy, and at least three other Woodrow Wilson School courses. They must also take at least three courses, 300-level or above, in one of the following departments: economics, history, politics, psychology, or sociology. In addition, students must take at least one course 300 or above in politics, economics, and history, and one in either psychology or sociology. Finally, the Woodrow Wilson School has ethics and methods requirements:

Ethics Requirement. Concentrators and certificate students must take one of the following courses: WWS 301, CHV 310, PHI 202, PHI 307, PHI 309, PHI 319, POL 313, REL 261, REL 363. Students intending to apply to the Woodrow Wilson School may want to fulfill their distribution requirements in ethical thought and moral values (EM) by selecting courses from the Woodrow Wilson School course offerings.

Methods Requirement. By the end of their junior year, concentrators and certificate students must take one of the following courses: WWS 332, WWS 333, ORF 245, ECO 302, ECO 312, ECO 313.

Independent Work

For WWS concentrators, the policy seminars fulfill the junior independent work requirement of the University. The senior thesis constitutes the independent work of the senior year. The senior thesis is a scholarly paper related to the subject in public or international affairs that is of greatest interest to the student. It is based on extended research and is the major project of the senior year. 

Senior Departmental Examination

The Woodrow Wilson School senior comprehensive examination is an oral defense of the thesis that also tests the student's ability to integrate the senior thesis with other course work.

Study Abroad

Although not a requirement, study abroad has become a regular part of the Woodrow Wilson School program. Study abroad during junior year is limited to those universities at which task forces may be offered. In recent years task forces have been offered at the University of Cape Town in South Africa; Oxford University in England; the Institute of Political and Social Sciences in Paris, France; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; Fudan University in Shanghai, China, and the University of Havana, Cuba.

Certificate Program. Princeton sophomores who intend to concentrate in other departments such as science or engineering may be admitted to the Woodrow Wilson School and awarded the school's certificate upon graduation. Certificate students apply to the school in the same manner as concentrators and are considered for admission on the same basis. They have fewer course requirements than concentrators.

Certificate students complete their junior independent work in their home departments. They also take a policy seminar each semester of their junior year and receive course credit for them. Certificate students fulfill the senior thesis requirement in one of two ways: (1) writing a senior thesis in their home department that has a substantial public policy component; (2) writing a senior thesis in the Woodrow Wilson School.

Research. The program awards several scholarships each year to students from any department for travel and living expenses related to senior thesis research in public policy. The program also awards several scholarships to Woodrow Wilson School students participating in public policy internships during the summer between the junior and senior years. 


Courses


WWS 300 Democracy   Fall SA

An introduction to current empirical and theoretical work done in politics on the following topics: the formation of the state, dictatorships, democratic transitions and democratic consolidation, electoral representation and political accountability, the relationship between democracy and redistribution, and the role of constitutional structures in the aggregation of preferences and in policy making. Two lectures, one preceptorial. N. McCarty, C. Boix

WWS 301 Ethics and Public Policy (also POL 308/CHV 301)   Spring EM

This course examines basic ethical controversies in public life. What rights do persons have at the beginning and end of life? Do people have moral claims to unequal economic rewards or is economic distribution properly subject to political design for the sake of social justice? Do we have significant moral obligations to distant others? Other possible topics include toleration (including the rights of religious and cultural minorities), racial and gender equity, and just war. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

WWS 304 Science, Technology, and Public Policy   Not offered this year SA

An exploration of the issues encountered by policymakers in scientific and technical areas of public policy. Topics include: the importance of understanding the scientific structure of a problem, critical ethical and technical assumptions, risk assessment, interest groups and policy alternatives, the roles and responsibilities of technical experts. Case studies and policy debates include: nuclear weapons policy, climate change, alternative energy futures, R and D policy, genetic engineering, and cancer risks. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

WWS 306 Public Leadership and Public Policy (also POL 329)   Spring SA

Considers the intellectual (ethical and legal) frameworks for making leadership decisions on major public issues in the United States, as well as the operational frameworks for effective and responsible public leadership. Students review historical cases from federal and state government, discuss the policy decisions made in each case, and examine the decision-making processes in view of these frameworks. Two 90-minute seminars. N. Scovronick

WWS 307 Economics and Public Policy (also ECO 349)   Fall SA

Evaluation of public policies in terms of economic efficiency and equity. The course will examine the conditions that lead to efficient markets and those that lead to market failure, as well as the implications for government policy. It will discuss both existing and proposed public policies in a number of areas, including education, health care, poverty, financial markets, the environment, and industrial development. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102, or instructor's permission. Two lectures, one preceptorial. E. Bogan

WWS 309 Media and Public Policy (also SOC 313)   Fall SA

Introduction to communications policy and law, covering such topics as freedom of the press and the development of journalism; intellectual property; regulation of telecommunications, broadcasting, and cable; and policy challenges raised by the Internet and the globalization of the media. P. Starr

WWS 310 The American City (also POL 339)   Not offered this year SA

An introduction to major theories of the growth and structure of cities, and an analysis of contemporary urban policy issues in the United States. We begin with a set of political, social, and economic explanations for the formation and character of American urban environments. To evaluate these theories, the evolution and structural change in United States cities, particularly in the postwar period, will be examined. The course is designed to provide students with the background necessary to analyze urban policies and the prospects for American cities in the next century. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

WWS 312 The Psychology of Decision Making and Judgment (also PSY 321)   Spring EC

An introduction to the logic of decision making and reasoning under uncertainty. Focus on psychological mechanisms that govern choice and judgment and on characteristic errors found in intuitive judgment and choice. Discussion of divergence from the model of rational agent often assumed in social science theory and economics. Rules governing pleasure, pain, and well-being provide background for analysis of the rationality of some individual choices and for the evaluation of general policies that affect human welfare. Prerequisite: introductory statistics for social science or instructor's permission. E. Shafir

WWS 313 Peacemaking (also POL 387)   Not offered this year SA

The course begins with a discussion of civil and international conflict and the history of making peace. It then focuses on contemporary civil wars and the lessons from an array of United Nations and other efforts to make peace, including the Gulf War, Cambodia, El Salvador, Somalia, and the former Yugoslavia. One lecture, one two-hour seminar. W. Nash

WWS 315 Bioethics and Public Policy   Fall SA

Focuses on the relationship between selected issues in bioethics and their implications for public policy. Issues include the ethical responsibilities of doctor and patient to each other; the ethics of research with human subjects; the ethics of death and dying; the ethics of reproduction; eugenics; access to health care; the role of bioethics committees; and animal experimentation. Considers the history of cultural attitudes toward these matters, the contemporary policies designed to deal with them, and the landmark court cases that have focused on bioethics. One three-hour seminar. H. Shapiro

WWS 316 Health and the Environment   Fall SA

Explores population history and its relationship to health; ecology, economics, and health; ecosystem dynamics; drought, famine, and health; psychosocial environments and physiology; well-being and positive health; and social stratification and morbidity. Staff

WWS 317 Race and Public Policy (also SOC 312/AAS 317)   Spring SA

Analyzes the historical construction of race as a concept in American society, how and why this concept was institutionalized publicly and privately in various arenas of U.S. public life at different historical junctures, and the progress that has been made in dismantling racialized institutions since the civil rights era. One three-hour seminar. D. Massey

WWS 320 Human Genetics, Reproduction, and Public Policy (also MOL 320)   Spring SA

Advances in genetic and reproductive technologies will soon make possible rapid, complete genetic screens on individuals and cells and, ultimately, permit us to direct our own evolution as a species. The course presents the science behind genetic screening, therapy, and enhancement, as well as cloning and the manipulation of human embryos, along with an analysis of anticipated uses by individuals and corporations. Discussions will focus on the impact of these revolutionary technologies on society as a whole, as well as on approaches to policy making. Prerequisites: MOL 209 or 214, or AP credit in biology, or instructor's permission. L. Silver

WWS 321 Theory and Practice of International Diplomacy (also POL 389)   Not offered this year

This course examines the development, challenges, and multiple complexities of international diplomacy. It addresses three dimensions: the conceptual aspects of diplomacy in the international system; the historic development of international diplomacy; and the intricacies of international negotiations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. W. Danspeckgruber

WWS 322 The Politics of Policy Making (also POL 341)   Not offered this year SA

How and why do American policymakers enact the policies that they do? This seminar first explores the environment in which policymakers operate, with special attention to public opinion and elections, and then examines how Congress, the president, and other political actors make decisions. One three-hour seminar. R. Arnold

WWS 324 Education Policy   Fall SA

This course will consider some of the major issues in education policy, with particular focus on attempts to secure equal educational opportunity. It will include discussions of desegregation and resource equity, education for immigrants and the handicapped, school choice, and school reform. Two 90-minute seminars. N. Scovronick

WWS 325 Civil Society and Public Policy (also AMS 350)   Fall SA

Civil society is the arena of voluntary organizations (churches, social welfare organizations, sporting clubs) and communal activity. Scholars now tell us that such voluntary and cooperative activities create "social capital"--a stock of mutual trust that forms the glue that holds society together. The course will be devoted to the study of the history of these concepts, and to the analysis of their application to the United States and other societies. This will be an interdisciplinary effort, embracing history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, and other disciplines. One three-hour seminar. S. Katz

WWS 327 Pharmaceutical Research and Health Policy (also CHM 443)   Not offered this year SA

Examines the process by which drugs are discovered, tested on human populations, and approved for sale. Analyzes the role of the Food and Drug Administration in guaranteeing the safety of medication, as well as the role of Congress in providing oversight, governing prices, and regulating competition. Examines the legal, political, and economic context in which health policy decisions are made in this area. Two 90-minute seminars. Staff

WWS 332 Quantitative Analysis for Public Policy   Fall, Spring QR

The course will review the principal methods of data analysis and applied statistics used in political, economic, psychological, and policy research, including multiple regression, analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. These methods will be introduced in the context of case studies that will incorporate research design, data collection, data management, exploratory and inferential analyses, and the presentation of results. Two lectures, one preceptorial. G. Lord

WWS 333 Claims and Evidence in Policy Research   Fall, Spring SA

Teaches concentrators the foundations of research design, including formulating researchable questions from topics and how to use empirical evidence to evaluate claims. Students are exposed to a variety of substantive problems and research approaches that use qualitative and quantitative methods through critical reading of social science literature. Covers several practical aspects of research, including ethics and regulations concerning research with human subjects; library search tools and reference sources in social sciences; and resources for acquiring data and conducting statistical analyses. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

WWS 334 Global Environmental Issues (see CEE 334)

WWS 335 Current and Future Climate (see GEO 366)

WWS 340 The History of Financial Crises (also HIS 466)   Fall SA

This course takes historical examples of financial crises over the past four centuries, including the tulip mania, 19th-century business cycles, international debt defaults, the 1907 crisis, the Great Depression, the Latin American debt crisis of the 1980s, the Asia crisis of 1997, and the post-2007 global financial crisis. Are there commonalities as well as differences in the experience of crisis? How do market participants, policymakers, and academic observers go about learning lessons and drawing conclusions from financial crises? Is there a need for a lender of last resort, domestically and internationally? One three-hour seminar. H. James

WWS 401 Policy Seminars   Fall

Open only to students enrolled in the school. (See description above.) Juniors who are concentrators in the school must register for the policy task force as "Junior Independent Work.'' Certificate students and seniors should register for WWS 401 or 402 as a course rather than junior independent work. Staff

WWS 402 Policy Seminars   Spring

Open only to students enrolled in the school. Juniors who are concentrators in the school must register for the policy task force as "Junior Independent Work.'' Certificate students and seniors should register for 401 or 402 as a course rather than junior independent work. Staff

WWS 451 Special Topics in Public Affairs   Fall SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. P. DiMaggio, D. Dobkin

WWS 452 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also POL 326/WOM 451)   SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. N. Keohane

WWS 456 Special Topics in Public Affairs   Fall SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. H. Price

WWS 457 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also POL 398)   SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. R. Keohane

WWS 462 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also EAS 462/POL 462)   Fall SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. E. Revere

WWS 466 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also NES 466/POL 466)   SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. D. Kurtzer

WWS 472 Special Topics in Public Affairs   SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. P. Krugman

WWS 473 Special Topics in Public Affairs   Not offered this year SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. R. Ahdieh

WWS 475 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also POL 475)   SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. , A. Friedberg, G. Ikenberry Staff

WWS 476 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also ECO 354)   Fall SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. W. Frist, S. Kotkin, J. Hammer

WWS 477 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also POL 477)   SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. C. Davis

WWS 478 Special Topics in Public Affairs   Fall SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. S. Kotkin

WWS 481 Special Topics in Public Affairs   Fall SA

Each term special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern for public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. These courses are open to students of all departments. J. Bolten

WWS 482 Special Topics in Public Affairs (also JDS 482)   SA

This course examines the political, legal, and regulatory structures for international economic relations. Half the course will cover the trading system (WTO), including the role of labor and environmental standards in trade agreements. The other half will cover selected topics in finance and investment. Particular attention will be paid to the economic and political issues raised by the intersection of international arrangements with domestic regulation of private economic conduct. E. Kaplan

WWS 488 Special Topics in Public Affairs   SA

Each term, special courses will be offered on topical issues of concern of public policy. Course form may be seminar, workshop, lecture with preceptorials, or other combinations. Theses courses are open to all students in other departments. , S. Pillai Staff

WWS 491 Critical Perspectives on Global Health and Health Policy (see GHP 350)

WWS 493 Technical Innovation and Foreign Policy (see EGR 492)

WWS 497 Race and the American Legal Process: Emancipation to the Voting Rights Act (see AAS 362)