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Academic Standing and Regulations

In keeping with a liberal arts philosophy, Princeton students are expected to be fully engaged members of an intellectual community, immersing themselves in the simultaneous study of a variety of disciplines before concentrating in one academic department. A Princeton undergraduate degree is grounded in a common experience of full-time residential study. The curriculum is designed in such a way that all students carry a similar course load and make adequate progress toward the degree (as described below). The first two years of study prepare students for the required independent work in the department of concentration, which is the hallmark of a Princeton education. Students are expected to be active participants in their education; the development of critical study and life skills, such as working independently, managing competing obligations, and completing work in a timely fashion, is an essential educational goal. Students are expected to observe all University deadlines (as described below) and may not carry incompleted courses into a subsequent term. Undergraduates pursuing an A.B. degree must complete all required junior independent work and a minimum of 24 courses before beginning senior year and embarking on the senior thesis; all B.S.E. students must complete a minimum of 26 courses, to include any independent work, before beginning senior year.

The following provisions provide the basic framework for undergraduate academic life at Princeton. Students are responsible for knowing these regulations and for observing them in the planning and completion of their programs of study.

The Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing administers these academic regulations on behalf of the faculty. Requests made under the following provisions, as well as petitions for exceptions to them, should first be discussed with a student’s residential college dean or director of studies. The final request or petition should be delivered in writing to Dean Claire Fowler, secretary to the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing, 406 West College, for presentation to the committee. Students do not appear in person before the committee.

Academic Year Sign In

All undergraduates who plan to matriculate for either the fall term or the full academic year are required to complete Academic Year Sign In online at the beginning of the fall term at a time determined by the registrar. Students who plan to resume their studies in the spring term after a leave or withdrawal must complete Academic Year Sign In at the beginning of the spring term. A student who, without an approved excuse, fails to register at the designated time incurs a fine of $75.

Selecting Courses

Each term, at a time specified by the registrar, all enrolled students submit their course choices online for the following term. To assist in this selection, Course Offerings indicates the courses available and the meeting times. Students are expected to discuss their course selection with their academic advisers prior to submitting final course choices. A student may not select a course that conflicts with the meeting times of any other course in which he or she is enrolled.

There is a fine of $10 for each day of lateness in submitting an approved set of courses.

Normal Course Load

A.B. Program. The normal course load for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors is four courses each term, with the exception of one term in freshman or sophomore year when a student typically will need to take five courses in order to meet the expectation that 17 courses will have been completed by the start of junior year.

Regardless of the number of courses completed prior to entering senior year, all seniors must, with the exception of the two programs listed below, complete a minimum of six courses in senior year. This is most often accomplished by enrolling in three courses each term but students may take four courses in one term and two courses in the other. Students in the Program in Teacher Preparation who have taken an extra course in an earlier year or a student who is participating in the University Scholar Program may be permitted to reduce their course load by one course in the senior year.

B.S.E. Program. Students in the B.S.E. program normally enroll in four courses in the fall of freshman year and in four or five courses in each succeeding term, in a sequence appropriate to their individual programs of study.

Minimum Course Load

Under exceptional circumstances and in consultation with an academic adviser and either a residential college dean or director of studies, a student may be allowed to fall one course short of the normal course load for a term, subject to the following guidelines:

A.B. Program. All freshmen, sophomores, and juniors must complete a minimum of three courses each term.

Seniors may enroll in two courses in one term, as long as they complete four courses in the other term and have no course deficiencies entering senior year.

B.S.E. Program. A freshman may, with special permission, complete a minimum of seven courses in the academic year and a summer school course to meet the minimum of eight successfully completed courses needed to start sophomore year. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors must complete at least four courses each term.

Minimum Progress Required for Advancement

Any student who, by the start of the fall term, has not completed the minimum number of courses required for advancement must withdraw from the University and either successfully complete a sufficient number of pre-approved courses at another four-year college or university or, when mandated by the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing, repeat a semester at Princeton.

A.B. Program. In order to advance to sophomore year, all A.B. students must have successfully completed a minimum of seven courses. Sixteen courses are required to achieve junior standing, while 24 courses are required to begin senior year.

B.S.E. Program. A freshman may, with special permission, enroll in a minimum of seven courses during the academic year. However, in such a case, he or she must, through a combination of Princeton courses and pre-approved summer school courses, successfully complete a minimum of eight courses to begin sophomore year. Seventeen courses are required to begin junior year, and 26 are required to begin senior year. A student who has not completed the stated minimum number of courses required for advancement will not be permitted to remain in the B.S.E. program and may be required to leave school.

Selecting a Department

At times designated by the registrar, all students select a departmental concentration. Unless granted special permission by the departmental representative, a student may enter a department only if the courses designated as prerequisites for the concentration have been successfully completed. Prerequisites normally must be taken as graded courses.

All A.B. students must select a departmental concentration prior to enrolling for the fall term of junior year. This choice is made in consultation with the departmental representative and most often occurs when signing up for fall term courses in the spring of sophomore year.

All B.S.E. students must select a departmental concentration prior to enrolling for the fall term of sophomore year. The selection process takes place late in the spring of freshman year, following conversations with the designated departmental adviser.

Students are required to meet all of the stated requirements of the concentration existing at the time they enter the department. Those students requesting exceptions to any departmental requirement must obtain the written permission of the departmental representative.

A student may transfer from one department to another only with the approval of the new department and the student's residential college dean or director of studies, acting for the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing. While some exceptions do exist, such transfers must normally be made by the start of the second term of junior year. A junior transferring to a new department must complete all required junior independent work by the start of senior year and must be capable of completing all departmental and University requirements within the normal eight-term program. The grades for any independent work completed prior to transferring to a new department will remain on the student's transcript.

While students are encouraged to explore diverse academic interests through a wide range of course choices and interdisciplinary certificate programs, the undergraduate degree is offered in just one academic department. Put another way, Princeton does not offer a double major.

The Rule of 12

A student in the A.B. program is limited to 12 one-term courses (plus independent work) in a given department, plus up to two departmental prerequisites taken during freshman or sophomore year. Students concentrating in departments without specific prerequisites may add up to two departmental courses taken during freshman or sophomore year to their total of 12 departmental courses. Foreign language courses at the 100-level do not count toward the departmental course limit of 12. Any student who exceeds the 31 courses required for graduation will be permitted to take extra departmentals. Exceptions to departmental course limits will be made on a case-by-case basis for students studying abroad, with the approval of Dean Nancy Kanach. Please note that for accounting purposes, cross-listed courses should be identified with the home department, which is the first department listed in the course identification number.

Course and Independent Work Requirements for Graduation

Except for those students who have been awarded a term or a year of advanced standing or who have been admitted to the University Scholar Program, all students must successfully complete the following course requirements:

A.B. Program. All A.B. students must successfully complete a minimum of 31 courses. Courses must be chosen in such a way as to meet the University general education requirements for A.B. students and the departmental requirements for the chosen field of concentration. In addition to 31 courses, all A.B. students must successfully complete departmental junior independent work, a senior thesis, and the departmental examination.

B.S.E. Program. All B.S.E. students must successfully complete a minimum of 36 courses. Courses must be chosen in such a way as to meet the University general education requirements for B.S.E. students and the departmental requirements for the chosen field of concentration. The independent work requirements for the B.S.E. program are set forth in the descriptions of the departmental programs of study. Independent work in the School of Engineering and Applied Science is awarded a course designation and counts toward the overall requirement of 36 courses.

Dropping and Adding Courses

Except under very unusual circumstances, the last date on which a student may add a course is the last day of the second week of classes.

A student who wishes to drop a course must request permission from his or her residential college dean or director of studies no later than the end of the ninth week of classes. No course, including courses taken in excess of the normal course load, may be dropped after that point. After the end of the ninth week of classes, students are held responsible for completing all courses in which they are enrolled and are assigned final grades in those courses. An upperclass student wishing to drop a departmental course after the second week of the term also must obtain permission from his or her departmental representative.

Failed Courses

A failed course does not count toward the number of courses needed for graduation or advancement with one's class, nor can it be used to satisfy any of the University requirements.

A failed course may result in a course deficiency if the student does not have an extra course to offset the failure. A course deficiency must be made up by taking an extra Princeton course in a subsequent term or by successfully completing a pre-approved course at another school.

While the grade of F in a course normally does not mean that the particular course must be repeated, there are several instances in which a failed course must be retaken and successfully completed. This is the case for a foreign language course taken to complete the language requirement; for the courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computer programming that are part of the B.S.E. degree requirements; for specific courses needed as prerequisites to enter a department or program; and for any course the successful completion of which is required of the concentrators in a given department. If a student chooses or is required to repeat a failed course, the failing grade remains on the transcript.

Failing grades may result in required withdrawal, failure to qualify for graduation, academic probation, or academic warning.

Course Deficiencies

A student who is making normal academic progress and who has not taken any extra courses incurs a course deficiency by failing a course, by dropping below the normal course load, by repeating a course in which he or she previously had earned a passing grade, or by failing to take the second course in an introductory-level foreign language sequence.

Course deficiencies may result in required withdrawal, failure to qualify for graduation, or inability to progress to the next year of study.

A student may remove a course deficiency either by taking an extra Princeton course in a subsequent semester or by successfully completing a pre-approved course at another school.

Advanced placement or college-level work completed prior to entering Princeton cannot be used to make up a course deficiency.

Grading

Princeton's grading policy sets a common grading standard for every academic department and program, under which As (A+, A, A-) should normally account for less than 35 percent of the grades given in undergraduate courses and less than 55 percent of the grades given in junior and senior independent work. The grading policy sets expectations for academic departments and programs rather than individual faculty members. It does not mean that only 35 percent of students in each course will receive a grade in the A range, nor does it mean that a student who does A-range work will receive anything other than an A-range grade. If faculty members make rigorous evaluative judgments about the quality of student work, then over time, on average, across the University, about 35 percent of undergraduate students should be doing course work of the highest quality, and 55 percent should be doing independent work of the highest quality.

The same standards for judging academic performance apply to all students in a course, whether it is taken by an upperclass or underclass student, as a departmental or an elective course, or as an undergraduate or graduate course. A student may not, for example, submit extra work or revised work unless this opportunity is explicitly extended to all students in the course.

A student who wishes to appeal a course grade should begin by discussing the grade with the course professor. If necessary, the appeal may then be pursued with the chair or departmental representative of the department in which the course is offered. Finally, if the student believes that the grade was reached unfairly or in a manner not consistent with the stated grading policies of the course, an appeal should be brought to Dean Claire Fowler, acting for the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing. It is important to note that the committee judges only the fairness or consistency of the grading process; it does not make an independent assessment of the quality of the course work.

Grading Symbols

Final grades for undergraduate courses and independent work are reported at the end of each term in the following way:

A+Exceptional; significantly exceeds the highest expectations for undergraduate work
AOutstanding; meets the highest standards for the assignment or course
A-Excellent; meets very high standards for the assignment or course
B+Very good; meets high standards for the assignment or course
BGood; meets most of the standards for the assignment or course
B-More than adequate; shows some reasonable command of the material
C+Acceptable; meets basic standards for the assignment or course
CAcceptable; meets some of the basic standards for the assignment or course
C-Acceptable, while falling short of meeting basic standards in several ways
DMinimally acceptable; lowest passing grade
FFailing; very poor performance
PGrades of A+ through C– in courses taken on pass/D/fail basis
AuditSatisfactory completion of required work in a course taken on an audit basis
INCCourse not completed at end of term (late completion authorized)
WStudent withdrew from the University after completing the ninth week of the term

A grade of D is the minimum acceptable passing grade in all courses. There are five exceptions to this general rule: (1) most departments require at least a C average in departmental courses, and therefore a D in a departmental course or courses may lead to failure in the area of concentration; (2) the accumulation of two or more Ds in a term is regarded by the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing as evidence of serious academic weakness, for which letters of academic warning or academic probation may be issued; (3) a student may be required to withdraw if he or she receives two Ds while on academic probation; (4) a student who is required to repeat a term for academic reasons will not receive credit for a course in the repeated term in which he or she received a D; (5) a student taking a preapproved course outside Princeton must earn at least a C to receive credit for the course.

Pass/D/Fail Option

The intent of the pass/D/fail option is to encourage exploration and experimentation in curricular areas in which the student may have had little or no previous experience. The pass/D/fail option also may be used by the student in completing distribution courses. Students are permitted to elect the pass/D/fail option between the beginning of the seventh and the end of the ninth week of classes.

1. As part of his or her regular academic program, each undergraduate may elect pass/D/fail grading in as many as four courses. Courses designated pass/D/fail only ("pdfo") do not count against this total, nor do any courses taken above the number required for graduation (31 for A.B. candidates; 36 for B.S.E. candidates).

2. A student may elect only one pass/D/fail course per term, regardless of the number of courses in which the student is enrolled or how many pass/D/fail options he or she has remaining; courses designated pass/D/fail only ("pdfo") do not count against this limitation.

3. Any course, including courses to fulfill distribution requirements, may be taken pass/D/fail, with the following exceptions:

a) A student's own departmental courses, as well as technical course requirements in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, may ordinarily not be taken on a pass/D/fail basis.

b) Courses designated "No pass/D/fail" by the instructor may not be taken on a pass/D/fail basis.

c) Courses taken outside Princeton may not be taken on a pass/D/fail basis.

4. A student must declare a pass/D/fail election between the beginning of the seventh and the end of the ninth week of classes. No further changes in grading options will be permitted after 5 p.m. on the Friday of the ninth week of classes.

Recording Grades for Independent Work in More than One Department

Students may have only one concentration at Princeton. The degree and departmental honors are granted in one department only. Under special circumstances, however, a student may receive permission to complete independent work in more than one department. A student hoping to pursue this option must have completed the prerequisites for entry into the second department, and must have both the permission of the departmental representative in the second department and the permission of the Office of the Dean of the College. Such a student may then write junior papers and a senior thesis in the second department and have that work recorded on the transcript. Such additional independent work will not count toward a student's graduation requirements. Independent work written to fulfill the requirements of a certificate program is not recorded on the transcript.

Completion of Academic Work

Undergraduate courses are offered on a term basis. Required written work is subject to deadlines set by course instructors, departments, and the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing. Final examinations are scheduled by the registrar at the conclusion of each term. Failure to submit work or complete examinations by published deadlines will normally result in a failing grade for the missing work. Course professors may, at their discretion, require that a student earn a passing grade in each component of a course to earn an overall passing grade in the course. Certain exceptions to these practices are allowed under special provisions described below.

Attendance

Students are expected to attend all scheduled course meetings and exercises and to be present promptly at the start of instruction, unless prevented from doing so by illness or another compelling cause. An unexcused absence from class may adversely affect a student's grade and may lead to failure in a course, a student is expected to notify the course instructor of any absence and to arrange to make up any missed work.

Participation in a regularly scheduled varsity athletic contest constitutes an excused absence. This does not, however, include practices, team meetings, or other team functions. Students are required to notify course professors of these absences in advance of the scheduled dates and to make arrangements to make up any missed work.

Students who will miss a class or any course requirement because of religious observance will be excused that absence. However, students must notify their course professors of these conflicts and make arrangements to complete any missed work.

Tests and Other Work Scheduled during the Term

Students are expected to take all tests and quizzes at the scheduled times during the term. A student who is absent from a test because of illness or an equally compelling reason must inform the course instructor of the reason for the absence at the first opportunity. The instructor then decides whether the test is to be waived or a make-up test is to be given. An unauthorized absence from a test or quiz will normally result in a failing grade for that portion of the course. Course professors typically assign other written work to be completed prior to the end of classes. Students are required to submit this work by the date assigned by the professor. While professors may extend these deadlines to the last day of reading period (dean's date), extensions are not permitted beyond that date. Failure to submit required work will result in the assignment of a failing grade for that component of the course.

End-of-Term Papers and Projects

All written course work, including term papers, homework assignments, lab reports, and projects, is due on the date set by the instructor, but in no case later than the date set by the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing for the submission of written work, normally the last day of reading period. In the absence of an authorized extension (see below), a failing grade will be assigned to any work not completed by this deadline.

A student who is unable to complete written work by the University deadline because of illness or another equally compelling reason beyond his or her control may apply for permission to submit the work late. This application must be made to the appropriate residential college dean or director of studies. The application must be made on or before the due date, and the endorsement of the course professor is required. Course professors may not independently grant extensions beyond the University deadline.

If the request for an extension of the deadline is approved, the student and the course professor will be notified of the new due date. Normally, only short-term extensions are granted, and the new deadline will not extend past the last date of the examination period. In exceptional cases, a longer-term extension may be granted at the discretion of the residential college dean.

A student whose request for an extension is approved may receive the symbol of Incomplete (INC), which is converted to the appropriate grade on submission of the written work on or before the new deadline. Failure to submit work by the extended deadline will result in a failing grade for that component of the course.

A student whose request is denied must submit the written work by the University deadline or receive a failing grade for that component of the course.

Final Exams

Each term, the registrar schedules final examinations during an 11-day final examination period. Examinations must be taken at the assigned times, so students should be prepared to be available throughout the examination period and should not schedule personal travel until the examination schedule has been published. The registrar, acting for the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing, may authorize a student to take an examination up to 24 hours before or after the scheduled examination time. Appropriate reasons for granting such requests are religious days, personal emergencies, and more than one examination scheduled in a single calendar day. Examinations will normally be rescheduled during the 24 hours after the scheduled examination time; examinations will be rescheduled during the 24-hour period before the regularly scheduled time only in the most unusual and compelling circumstances.

A student who, because of illness or another compelling reason outside his or her control, wishes to postpone a final examination more than 24 hours beyond the scheduled time may apply for authorization of a postponed examination. The request must be made prior to the scheduled examination time and must include the endorsement of the course professor. Students apply through their residential college deans or directors of studies. Rescheduled fall-term examinations are administered only during the third week of spring term classes; rescheduled spring-term examinations are given in the week preceding the beginning of the next fall term.

A student who has received authorization for a postponed final examination will receive the symbol of Incomplete (INC) until the examination has been completed and a final grade reported.

A student who fails to take a scheduled examination or a rescheduled examination will receive a failing grade for that portion of the course.

A student who becomes ill or otherwise incapacitated at the time of a scheduled examination should report immediately to University Health Services and then notify the deputy registrar, as well as his or her residential college dean or director of studies, as soon as possible. If a student elects to take the examination at the scheduled time, his or her grade will not subsequently be altered on the grounds of poor health or other problems.

A student who arrives late at an examination but within 30 minutes of the scheduled start time will be given the examination and permitted to complete as much work as possible during the remaining time.

A student who arrives at an examination more than 30 minutes late must notify the deputy registrar immediately. A student who misses an examination entirely, for any reason, must notify the deputy registrar as soon as possible. In these cases, upon review of the circumstances, the student may be allowed to make up the examination in the next available examination period. Such a make-up examination is permitted only once in a student's undergraduate years. Failure to report a missed examination within 24 hours of the scheduled examination time will result in a failing grade for the exam.

Take-Home Final Exams

Faculty may elect to assign a take-home examination rather than a final examination scheduled by the registrar. Take-home examinations must be scheduled for completion during the first six days of the final examination period; they may not be scheduled for completion before dean's date.

Independent Work

The Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing establishes deadlines each term for the submission of junior independent work and in the spring for submission of the senior thesis. While individual departments may set earlier deadlines for this work, departmental deadlines may not be later than those set by the committee. A student who will not be able to meet a departmental deadline may request an extension within the department to submit work no later than the University deadline.

Students who are unable to complete independent work by the University deadline because of illness or another compelling reason essentially outside their control may apply for permission to submit their work late. Students should apply to their residential college dean or director of studies on or before the due date and must include the endorsement of the adviser. An unauthorized failure to submit independent work by the University deadline or by an extended due date established by a residential college dean or director of studies will result in the assignment of a failing grade. In such cases, a second grade is added to the transcript when the late work is submitted. Both grades remain on the transcript.

No student will be permitted to enroll as a senior unless junior independent work has been successfully completed.

A senior who fails to submit an acceptable senior thesis will not be permitted to graduate until that requirement has been met.

Academic Standing and Regulations

Academic Standing

The Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing reviews the academic records of all students at the end of each term. A student is considered to be making satisfactory progress if the program of study for the degree of bachelor of arts or the program of study for the degree of bachelor of science in engineering has been followed and if the student is eligible to continue in the University. A student making satisfactory progress will advance with his or her class, subject to the following qualifications:

1. A student who has not successfully completed the writing requirement by the end of the fall term of sophomore year will be placed on a special form of academic probation called writing probation (see below). If such a student fails to complete the writing seminar in the spring of sophomore year, he or she will be required to withdraw from the University and must apply to repeat the spring term of sophomore year. Failure to complete the requirement in the repeated term will result in a second, and final, required withdrawal.

2. A candidate for the A.B. degree who has not completed the foreign language requirement by the end of junior year may be required to withdraw from the University. If permitted to remain in school, the student must present a plan for completion of the requirement in senior year.

3. A student who is absent from the University or unable to attend classes for a substantial period of time, as determined by the Office of the Dean of the College, must withdraw from the University and apply for readmission to repeat the term.

4. A student must have successfully completed all of his or her degree requirements by the end of the spring term of senior year to be eligible to graduate.

Academic Probation and Academic Warning

The Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing reviews the records of all students at the end of each term and, when appropriate, places students on academic probation or issues letters of academic warning.

1. Those students whose records, while not making them eligible for required withdrawal, indicate either poor overall standing or particular weaknesses, for example, in departmental work, are placed on academic probation. Eligibility for intercollegiate athletic participation may be withheld for a student on academic probation.

2. A student will be placed on writing probation at the end of the third term of enrollment for failure to complete the writing requirement regardless of overall performance, and may be placed on writing probation in addition to academic probation for poor overall standing. A student on writing probation who fails to complete the writing requirement by the end of sophomore year will be required to withdraw from the University.

3. The committee reviews the records of all students on academic probation at the end of the following term and reports its judgment to those students. A student whose record does not improve substantially while on academic probation may be required to withdraw. A single failing grade or a record with two or more Ds while on academic probation will normally result in a required withdrawal.

4. Letters of academic warning are issued to students whose records for the preceding term, while not warranting academic probation, indicate weak academic performance. Academic warning letters are intended to alert students to the need for improvement and to suggest ways in which performance might be improved.

5. Additionally, letters may be sent during the term to students who are reported to be absent without excuse from portions of a course, or who are performing below expectations in any aspect of a course.

Required Withdrawal

1. A student ordinarily will be required by the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing to withdraw from the University at the end of a term or year on the basis of the following provisions:

a) A freshman who receives the grade of F in three or more courses or incurs three deficiencies in one term or incurs a total of four deficiencies during the year.

b) A student who receives a grade of F in two or more courses in any term of sophomore, junior, or senior year; or the grade of F in three consecutive terms in sophomore, junior, and senior years; or the grade of F in a total of four or more courses in sophomore, junior, and senior years.

c) A student who has been placed on academic probation (see above) and whose record fails to improve substantially during the term.

d) A student on writing probation during the spring of sophomore year who, regardless of performance in other courses, fails to complete the writing requirement.

e) A student who, prior to the start of any given academic year, has not successfully completed the minimum number of courses needed for advancement.

2. A student may be required to withdraw at the end of a term if he or she receives a grade of F in one or more courses and the grade of F in independent work for the term. A student whose overall departmental performance has been only marginal ordinarily will be required to withdraw if withdrawal is recommended by the department.

3. A student who has been required to withdraw may, at the discretion of the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing, be required to apply for readmission to repeat the unsuccessful term at Princeton, or, in exceptional circumstances, be allowed to remove deficiencies incurred by failed courses and return without having to repeat the unsuccessful term. In either case, all grades received during the failed term will be recorded on the Princeton transcript.

4. Readmission to Princeton is never guaranteed to a student who has been required to withdraw, but the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing may grant a second opportunity after a student has demonstrated readiness to resume academic work. In general, the committee will insist on a strong record of performance in a demanding work experience or successful completion of courses at another school. Specific requirements may be established by the committee.

5. A student who has left the University twice for academic reasons should not expect a third opportunity to qualify for a degree.

Failure to Qualify for Graduation

A senior will be considered to have failed to qualify for the bachelor's degree unless he or she has completed all of the stated requirements for graduation in his or her degree program. Such a failure may result from the failure to complete the number of courses required for graduation, failure to satisfy all departmental and general education requirements, failure to meet the minimum departmental grade point average, failure to submit an acceptable senior thesis, any grade of Incomplete on the transcript, and, depending on departmental policy, failure to complete successfully the departmental examination.

A senior who fails to qualify for graduation may attend the Commencement ceremony with the graduating class. However, only the names of those students who have successfully completed all of the degree requirements will appear in the Commencement program. Diplomas will be issued only to those students who have completed all graduation requirements.

The Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing will notify any student who has failed to qualify for the degree and indicate what must be done to satisfy any remaining degree requirements.

Rights of Rehearing and Appeals

A student concerning whom the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing has taken any action has the right to request a second consideration of the case by that committee in the light of any new evidence that can be submitted.

An action of the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing may be appealed on procedural grounds to the faculty. Review and final determination of an appeal is assigned to the Faculty Advisory Committee on Policy. A student who decides to appeal a decision with respect to academic standing must promptly notify the dean of the faculty in writing. A student may continue to attend classes and use other University facilities while a rehearing or appeal is being considered. However, during the appeal period the student is not considered to be a student in good standing.

Leave of Absence

Upon the satisfactory completion of any term, undergraduates are eligible to take leaves of absence at the discretion of the dean of the college for one, two, or three years, but not less than one year. Students placed on academic or disciplinary probation at the end of a term are eligible to apply for a leave of absence, but they will be on academic or disciplinary probation for the first term after their return. An individual on leave of absence from Princeton is ordinarily assured readmission to continue his or her program of study from the point at which it was interrupted. The dean of the college must receive notification at a specified date well in advance of the beginning of the term in which the individual intends to resume studies.

Voluntary Withdrawal

An undergraduate who begins a term of study and leaves the University before the end of reading period is considered to have withdrawn voluntarily. Readmission is normally not guaranteed to a student who withdraws voluntarily. However, the Faculty Committee on Examinations and Standing generally gives favorable consideration to a request for readmission supported by a record of productive activity while away from Princeton that indicates readiness to resume full-time study without further difficulty or interruption. The dean of the college or the dean of undergraduate students also may establish specific additional requirements for readmission if the circumstances of the withdrawal warrant this action. All requests for voluntary withdrawal and applications for readmission must be presented to the Office of the Dean of the College for approval. A student who has had a total of three withdrawals from the University, whether voluntary or required for academic reasons, should not expect a further opportunity to qualify for a degree.

Readmission after Time Away

Students planning to apply for readmission should contact their residential college dean if they have not received materials by March 15 for the fall term and November 15 for the spring term.

Students with Disabilities and Requests for Reasonable Accommodation

Princeton University is committed to ensuring equal access to its educational programs for students with disabilities. The Office of Disability Services (ODS) utilizes an interactive process including an intake interview to understand a student's disability and explore reasonable academic accommodations. The term "disability" may include learning, physical, sensory, psychological, medical, and certain temporary disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (504), and the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (NJLAD) prohibit discrimination against individuals with disabilities and entitle individuals with disabilities to reasonable accommodations. To establish that an individual requires accommodations, documentation must be submitted that confirms the existence of a specific disability and current functional limitations caused by the disability, in relation to most people. A diagnosis of a disorder or submission of documentation does not automatically qualify an individual for accommodations. Documentation must meet the University's requirements, available on the ODS website, including: an evaluation by a qualified professional, completed within a specified time period, which provides information about diagnosis and functional limitations, and supports the requested accommodation(s). The process may include a review of the documentation by an outside consultant engaged by Princeton University. All requests are reviewed on an individual basis.

Students with disabilities who seek accommodations must register with ODS (242 Frist Campus Center, 609-258-8840). Registration through self-identification is a voluntary process that is treated confidentially and may occur at any time during the student's course of study.