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Department of Music

Chair

Steven Mackey

Departmental Representative

V. Kofi Agawu

Director of Graduate Studies

Wendy Heller (Musicology) (fall)

Simon Morrison (Musicology) (spring)

Daniel Trueman (Composition) (fall)

Dmitri Tymoczko (Composition) (spring)

Professor

V. Kofi Agawu  

Scott G. Burnham  

Wendy Heller  

Paul Lansky  

Steven Mackey  

Simon A. Morrison  

Daniel L. Trueman

Dmitri Tymoczko

Barbara A. White  

Associate Professor

Rob C. Wegman

Assistant Professor

Noriko Manabe

Senior Lecturer

Anthony D. J. Branker, University Jazz Ensembles

Gabriel Crouch, University Glee Club, Chamber Choir

Michael J. Pratt, University Orchestra, University Opera Theatre, and Composers' Ensemble

Lecturer

S. Ellen Lockhart, also Council of the Humanities

Associated Faculty

Rebecca A. Fiebrink, Computer Science


Information and Departmental Plan of Study

The Department of Music encourages students to explore music according to their individual needs, interests, and aspirations. Students may pursue work in composition, music history, theory, analysis and interpretation, non-Western music, music technology, performance, and improvisation. Courses offered through the department cover this wide range of activities. Many courses are geared not only to majors but also to a variety of students involved with music and music making.

Advanced Placement

The Department of Music does not grant advanced placement exam credit. Freshmen who wish to enroll in a course where "any music course" is listed as a prerequisite must obtain the permission of the departmental representative or the course instructor.

Prerequisites

Students are expected to attain a certain competence in music theory before entering the department. This general prerequisite may be satisfied by the completion of 105, 106 or of 205, 206. Because certain upper-level courses have as a prerequisite a year of music theory, students who are considering majoring in music are advised to take 105, 106 in their freshman year.

Early Concentration

Qualified students who have completed the departmental prerequisites early may be allowed to begin departmental concentration in the sophomore year.

Program of Study

Students majoring in music design their program in close consultation with the departmental representative. In addition to the two prerequisite courses (105, 106 or 205, 206), music majors are required to take a minimum of nine additional courses.

A second year of theory, 205, 206, is required. (In cases where 205, 206 has already been taken as a prerequisite, majors are expected to take two additional electives.) Also required are three courses chosen from those listed below under Group I (Western music history sequence), one course from Group II (non-Western and non-canonical music), and three additional electives at the 300 level or higher (with a strong recommendation that one of these be another theory course). Music majors in the performance program may use 213, 214, or 215 as a departmental course.

Group I (Western music history): 230, 232, 234, 236, 238, 240, 242

Group II (non-Western and noncanonical music): 250, 251, 254, 255, 257, 258, 259, 260, 262, 264, 265

Languages

Students planning graduate study in music should achieve reading and speaking proficiency in at least one foreign language. German, French, and Italian are most germane to the study of Western music. Some experience with composition software may also be of use.

Independent Work

Junior Independent Work. Juniors participate in a junior seminar their first semester. This weekly seminar is led by the departmental representative. Students in the seminar are responsible for various writing assignments, including one substantial paper. In the second semester, students either (1) write a research paper that allows them to explore the theoretical, historical, and analytical literature on music as well as develop their own ideas; or (2) write a substantial musical composition.

Senior Independent Work. The senior thesis may range from an extended essay on a musicology topic to a project in composition. The specific topic or project of the thesis is agreed upon in discussions with a faculty adviser.

Senior Departmental Examination

Departmental examinations are held after the submission of senior theses. The examination is broad in scope and covers a wide range of musical knowledge.

Study Abroad

Beginning in 2007, Princeton began a unique collaboration with the Royal College of Music in London, in which students have the opportunity to participate in a five-year double-degree program (A.B. and M.M.). Students spend the fall semester of the junior year in London. Interested current and prospective music majors should email the director of the Certificate Program in Musical Performance for further details.

Musicianship. Some training in musicianship is a component in the undergraduate theory courses, but it is expected that students will also work on aural and practical skills on their own. At least a minimal competence at the keyboard is expected of all music concentrators as well.

Instrumental and Vocal Lessons. The Department of Music has highly qualified professionals on the performance faculty who provide co-curricular studio instruction subsidized by the Department for Music majors and students in the certificate program for musical performance. Partial subsidies are available to other students under certain conditions. Extra-curricular studio instruction is also offered. Special arrangements for instruction at Westminster Choir College can be made for a limited number of students through an inter-institutional exchange agreement. For further information, please contact Gregory Smith at gsmith@princeton.edu.

Performance for Departmental Concentrators. Serious students of music, whatever their particular interests or eventual orientation, need to have at least some experience in performing music. Music concentrators are expected to be pursuing some performance study by taking vocal or instrumental lessons. It is recommended that prospective concentrators without at least minimal keyboard skills study piano. Concentrators are also urged to participate in the ensembles conducted by department staff.

Technical, Electroacoustic, and Computer Facilities. The music department is equipped with complete facilities for recording, editing, creating, and processing sound. There are five studios: a central studio equipped with a Digidesign Control 24 mixing surface, a Macintosh computer, a Pro Tools TDM system with a large supply of plug-ins, Max/MSP, most standard software packages, and surround-sound capabilities; two other studios have similar setups, with specialized video-editing equipment, and other specialized software. There is a room dedicated to hardware construction with soldering stations and electronic components, and a computer keyboard workstation in a fifth studio dedicated to composition and score production.


Courses


MUS 103 Introduction to Music   LA

A listener's introduction to western musical styles from the middle ages to the present. The course is designed for students with no previous musical background and is taught essentially without musical notation. Emphasis is on guided analytic listening to selected works of Bach, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Two lectures, one class. S. Morrison, W. Heller

MUS 104 When Music Is Made   LA

An introduction to the fundamental materials of a variety of musics, including Western concert music, jazz, and popular music. Course activities center around interrelated theoretical, compositional, and analytical projects that serve to explore issues of music theory, style, and creativity. Two lectures, two preceptorials. P. Lansky

MUS 105 Music Theory through Performance and Composition   Fall LA

An introduction to the procedures, structures, and aesthetics of tonal music. Composing, singing, playing, analysis of music such as 18th-century chorale, and 18th- and 19th-century piano music. Emphasis on fluency in handling tonal materials as a means of achieving a variety of formal and expressive ends. Two lectures, two classes, one session in practical musicianship. D. Tymoczko, B. White, S. Burnham

MUS 106 Music Theory through Performance and Composition   Spring LA

An introduction to the procedures, structures, and aesthetics of tonal music. Composing, singing, playing, analysis of music such as 18th-century chorale, and 18th- and 19th-century piano music. Emphasis on fluency in handling tonal materials as a means of achieving a variety of formal and expressive ends. Two lectures, two classes, one session in practical musicianship. Prerequisite: ability to read music. D. Tymoczko, B. White, S. Burnham

MUS 205 Species Counterpoint   Fall LA

An introduction to the principles of voice leading and linear construction through a series of systematic compositional exercises. Two lectures, two classes. Prerequisite: 106 or equivalent. S. Mackey, D. Trueman

MUS 206 Tonal Syntax   Spring LA

An introduction to the syntactic structure of the music of the 18th and 19th centuries through exercises in analysis and composition. Two lectures, two classes. Prerequisite: 205 or equivalent. S. Mackey, D. Trueman

MUS 210 Beginning Workshop in Musical Composition   LA

A continuous cycle of creation, discussion, and response based on the creative musical activity of the students. Varieties of kind and style--notated composition, multimedia music, multitracking, and improvisation--are encouraged. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. S. Mackey, P. Lansky

MUS 213 Projects in Instrumental Performance   LA

Guides students in extended projects in performance. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. M. Amory, S. Canin, N. Lee

MUS 214 Projects in Vocal Performance   LA

Guides students in extended projects in performance. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Staff

MUS 215 Projects in Jazz Performance   Fall LA

A performance course that focuses on the development of style, concept, and repertoire in the jazz idiom. Students are coached by faculty in extended projects in performance. One three-hour class. Staff

MUS 216 Techniques of Conducting   LA

This course will introduce the vocabulary and skills necessary for a conductor to communicate with an ensemble, including score-reading, hearing, rehearsing, interpreting, and solving problems in the musical text. As the final project, students will conduct an ensemble of instruments and/or singers in a concert. Prerequisite: background in music theory, some keyboard skill, permission of instructor. Two 90-minute classes. G. Crouch, M. Pratt

MUS 220 The Opera   LA

An introduction to opera. Lectures deal with works by major composers, conventions of libretto poetry, singers and voice types, musical forms and dramatic pacing, and opera staging. Classes are devoted to close study of two works and the plays on which they were based. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: any music course, or some musical background, or instructor's permission. Open to freshmen. W. Heller

MUS 221 Choral Music (also REL 221)   LA

A survey of vocal literature (excluding opera) from the early Middle Ages to the present. Relations between text and music are stressed. The classes are devoted to a close study of two or three works. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Staff

MUS 225 Instrumental Music: The Symphony from Haydn to Stravinsky   LA

A study of the development of the symphony from its origins in the mid-18th century through the first half of the 20th. Representative works will be chosen for detailed study in the class meetings. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: any music course, some musical background, or instructor's permission. S. Burnham, W. Heller

MUS 226 Instrumental Music: The Concerto   LA

A study of the concerto genre persisting through stylistic and formal changes from the 17th to the 20th centuries. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: any music course, some musical background, or instructor's permission. Staff

MUS 230 Music in the Middle Ages (also MED 230)   Fall LA

Major developments of Western music up to about 1400, including some of the following: the origin and growth of chant, its liturgical context and musical properties; medieval secular song; early polyphony and Parisian organum; the French ars nova and Machaut; the Italian trecento; English medieval music. Prerequisite: a year of theory or instructor's permission. R. Wegman

MUS 232 Music in the Renaissance   LA

Introduction to the history and current scholarship of European music in the period 1400-1600. The principal thread is compositional history; in addition, the course includes extensive coverage of these topics: aesthetics, orality/literacy, improvisation, gender and sexuality. R. Wegman

MUS 234 Music of the Baroque   LA

An introductory survey of style developments, aesthetic trends affecting music, and principal vocal and instrumental genres (opera, cantata, concerto, sonata, and suite) of the period 1600-1750. Major figures to be considered include Monteverdi, Schütz, Lully, Corelli, Vivaldi, Handel, and J. S. Bach. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Prerequisite: any music course or instructor's permission. W. Heller

MUS 236 Music of the Classical Period   LA

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the music of the Viennese Classical period. In addition to becoming familiar with some 20 musical works by Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, students will engage the cultural context of this music, including historical, aesthetic, and biographical issues. Includes units on the primary instrumental genres of the Classical style and concludes with a series of in-depth analyses of large-scale works by each composer. Two lectures, one class. S. Burnham

MUS 238 Music of the Romantic Era   LA

A study of major styles and issues in European music from the death of Beethoven through the generation after Wagner, as seen against the aesthetic and cultural backgrounds of the time. Selected works from Schubert through Strauss and Mahler may be included. Two one-hour lectures and one one-hour class. Prerequisite: any music course, or some musical background, or instructor's permission. S. Morrison

MUS 240 Musical Modernism 1890-1945   LA

An introduction to modern music, beginning with its origins in late Romanticism, up to World War II. Composers considered include Mahler, Stravinsky, Debussy, Ravel, and Berg. Topics range from urban centers for modern music (Paris and Vienna), the relationship of musical modernism to contemporary literature and visual arts, music and politics, to the impact of recording technology and cinema on musical arts. Prerequisite: any music course, some classical music background, or instructor's permission. Two lectures, one preceptorial. S. Morrison

MUS 242 Music since 1945   LA

European and American music since World War II. Study of many recent approaches to music and their cultural, social, and philosophical bases. Topics include: postwar European avant-garde, American extensions of serialism, technological developments, influences of popular and folk cultures, American avant-garde. Prerequisite: any music course, some musical background, or instructor's permission. Two lectures, one preceptorial. P. Lansky

MUS 250 Musical Cultures of the World (also ANT 250)   LA

Music cultures outside the mainstream European and American tradition. Focus on aspects of musical style as well as on understanding social, cultural, and historical context of folk art and tribal musics of Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The course is designed for nonmajors. Two lectures, one preceptorial. N. Manabe

MUS 251 Music and Film   LA

An examination of the effect of different compositional practices and different sound technologies on the film viewer. The course will focus on three parameters of film music: music that has a visual point of origin on the screen (diegetic music), music that does not have a visual point of origin on the screen (nondiegetic music, also called background scoring), and music that floats between these two realms. Prerequisite: 103, or 105, or permission of instructor. One three-hour seminar. S. Morrison

MUS 257 Introduction to the Music of India   LA

An introduction to the melodic types (raga), metric types (tala), and the principal vocal and instrumental genres of South Asian art music. One three-hour class. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Staff

MUS 258 Music of Africa (also AFS 258)   LA

Introduction to the vocal and instrumental music of Africa south of the Sahara. Topics include the place of music in society, the influence of language on musical composition, principles of rhythmic organization, urban popular music, "art" music as a response to colonialism, and the impact of African music on the earliest forms of African American music. Two 90-minute lectures. V. Agawu

MUS 260 Music in the United States   LA

Introduction to the history of American music from the 18th to mid-20th centuries, including sacred music and folk song in the American colonies, concerts and opera, spiritual songs, dances, band music, ragtime, the "high-art" music traditions, Charles Ives, Aaron Copland, jazz, swing, blues, musicals. Prerequisite: 103. Two 90-minute classes. R. Wegman, N. Manabe

MUS 262 Introduction to the Evolution of Jazz Styles (also AAS 262)   LA

An introduction survey examining the historical development of jazz from its African origins through the present. The course will place emphasis on the acquisition of listening skills and explore related musical and social issues. A. Branker

MUS 264 Urban Blues and the Golden Age of Rock   LA

Examines post-World War II blues, rock music mostly of the late sixties and early seventies, and the connections between them. Explores wider musical and extramusical connections. Two lectures, one class. R. Wegman, N. Manabe

MUS 270 Medieval and Renaissance Music from Original Notation   LA

A "hands-on" course that explores music from before 1600 using the pedagogical methods of the period. Medieval and Renaissance techniques of sight-singing, memorization, improvisation, and harmonization will be learned. Modern computer technology will also be used to investigate the deeper mystical and philosophical content of music from this period. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: ability to read modern music notation comfortably. Staff

MUS 300 Topics in Brazilian Cultural and Social History (see POR 304)

MUS 301 Princeton Atelier (see ATL 494)

MUS 303 Development of the Multi-Skilled Performer (see THR 335)

MUS 308 Contemporary Music through Composition and Performance   LA

An introduction to a variety of 20th-century approaches to composition. Emphasis on understanding different techniques, syntaxes, and musical languages through exercises in compositional emulations and in performance projects of student and studied works, using available performance skills of participants. Prerequisite: 206 or instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar, one preceptorial. P. Lansky, S. Mackey, V. Agawu

MUS 309 Topics in Tonal Analysis   LA

The course will deal closely with a small number of works from the tonal repertoire and will serve as a critical introduction to several pertinent and influential analytical methodologies, including motivic, formal, semiotic, and voice-leading analysis. The focus will be on the musical and aesthetic values that each method either enhances or attenuates. Prerequisite: 206 or instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar. V. Agawu, N. Manabe, D. Trueman

MUS 310 Advanced Workshop in Musical Composition   LA

An opportunity for students who have developed sufficient compositional skills to work on more extended and advanced projects. Three hours per week. S. Mackey

MUS 311 Jazz Theory through Improvisation and Composition I   LA

An exploration of the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic principles of the bebop paradigm. The course includes analysis of representative works by various jazz masters and will place a strong emphasis on student projects in improvisation and composition. Prerequisites: 105 or permission of instructor. Two 90-minute classes. A. Branker

MUS 312 Jazz Theory through Improvisation and Composition II   LA

An examination of the theoretical principles found in modal jazz through analysis of representative works by such composers as Wayne Shorter, Joe Henderson, and Herbie Hancock. The course will place a strong emphasis on student projects in improvisation and composition. Prerequisites: 105 or permission of instructor. Two 90-minute classes. A. Branker

MUS 314 Computer and Electronic Music through Programming, Performance, and Composition (also COS 314)   QR

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer and electronic music in the context of the Princeton Laptop Orchestra (PLOrk). The music and sound programming language ChucK, developed here at Princeton, will be used in conjunction with Max/MSP, another digital audio language, to study procedural programming, digital signal processing and synthesis, networking, and human-computer interfacing. D. Trueman

MUS 315 Transforming Reality by Computer (see COS 325)

MUS 316 Computer and Electronic Music Composition   LA

Compositional projects involving computers and synthesizers. Some work may involve interactions between live and electronic sounds. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 314 or permission of instructor. D. Trueman

MUS 323 Studies of Orchestral Music   LA

Particular works or groups of works by a single composer but with reference to other music, either by the same or by related composers. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisite: 206. S. Mackey

MUS 324 Romantic Piano Music   LA

A survey of piano music in the 19th century, including works for solo piano, songs for piano and voice, and concerti. Topics include the piano as instrument and innovation, piano genres and idioms, social contexts for piano performance, virtuosity. Prerequisites: 105, or experience as performer, or permission of instructor. One three-hour seminar. Staff

MUS 332 Monteverdi: Madrigal and Opera 1575-1650   LA

Detailed examination of the principal genres of Italian secular music of the late 16th and early 17th centuries, using the works of Monteverdi as a main point of reference. Some attention to placing musical issues in a context of political and social history. Classes will concentrate on a close analysis of selected works by Monteverdi and his contemporaries, with emphasis on the relationship between text and music. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: one year of theory or permission of instructor. W. Heller

MUS 333 Bach and Handel   LA

The contrasting careers and oeuvres of the two greatest representatives of the late baroque in music will be considered both individually and comparatively. Prerequisite: a year of theory or instructor's permission. W. Heller

MUS 335 Mozart's Operas   LA

A study of the integration of music, language, and drama through close reading of the seven completed operas of Mozart's maturity. One three-hour class-seminar. Prerequisite: one year of music theory or instructor's permission. Staff

MUS 336 Beethoven   LA

A survey of Beethoven's works, touching in addition upon his life, the music of his contemporaries, and his influence upon later composers. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a year of theory (105/106) or instructor's permission. S. Burnham

MUS 337 Wagner (also GER 302)   LA

An introduction to Richard Wagner's operas, to Wagner as a revolutionary presence in 19th-century musical and aesthetic thought, to Wagner's theoretical and polemical prose writings, and contemporary writings about him. Three hours. Prerequisite: a year of theory or instructor's permission. Ability to read German helpful but not necessary. Staff

MUS 339 Russian Music (also SLA 311)   LA

A detailed survey of Russian national and international composers. Topics of discussion and analysis will include magic opera, realism, orientalism, the relationship between composers and poets of the Russian Symbolist era, the World of Art movement and the Ballets Russes, Soviet film music, Soviet arts doctrine, and musical aesthetics (especially as they pertain to authorship and identity). Prerequisites: 105 or permission of instructor. Two 90-minute classes. S. Morrison

MUS 352 Music in Antebellum America, 1800-1860   LA

An introduction to the varieties of musical experience in 19th-century America through the Civil War, paying particular attention to popular music, classical music, hymns, and African American traditions. The course will relate these experiences to contemporaneous literature, painting, sociocultural, political, and racial conditions. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

MUS 366 American Musical Theater History (see THR 366)

MUS 430 Topics in History, Analysis, and Interpretation   Fall LA

Topics chosen from, but not limited to: a group of works by a single composer (Leonin's organa, Monteverdi's madrigals, Brahms's symphonies); a certain genre (19th-century choral works, Hindustani Khayal, contemporary rock, late 16th-century madrigal); a specific theoretical or historical problem (atonal theory, composers' sketches and musical analysis, the origins of opera). One three-hour seminar. Staff

MUS 431 Topics in History, Analysis, and Interpretation   Spring LA

Topics chosen from, but not limited to: a group of works by a single composer (Leonin's organa, Monteverdi madrigals, Brahms's symphonies); a certain genre (19th-century choral works, Hindustani Khayal, contemporary rock, late 16th-century madrigal); a specific theoretical or historical problem (atonal theory, composers' sketches and musical analysis, the origins of opera). One three-hour seminar. Staff