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Department of Politics

Chair

Nolan M. McCarty

Acting Chair

Adam H. Meirowitz (fall/spring)

Associate Chair

Melissa Lane

Departmental Representative

Markus Prior

Director of Graduate Studies

Keith E. Whittington

Professor

Christopher H. Achen

R. Douglas Arnold, also Woodrow Wilson School

Gary J. Bass, also Woodrow Wilson School

Mark R. Beissinger

Charles R. Beitz

Carles Boix, also Woodrow Wilson School

Charles M. Cameron, also Woodrow Wilson School

Brandice Canes-Wrone, also Woodrow Wilson School

Thomas J. Christensen, also Woodrow Wilson School

Christina Davis, also Woodrow Wilson School

Aaron L. Friedberg, also Woodrow Wilson School

Robert P. George

Martin I. Gilens

Joanne S. Gowa

G. John Ikenberry, also Woodrow Wilson School

Kosuke Imai

Amaney A. Jamal

Atul Kohli, also Woodrow Wilson School

Melissa Lane

Evan S. Lieberman

John B. Londregan, also Woodrow Wilson School

Stephen J. Macedo, also University Center for Human Values

Nolan M. McCarty, also Woodrow Wilson School

Adam H. Meirowitz

Tali Mendelberg

Helen V. Milner, also Woodrow Wilson School

Andrew M. Moravcsik, also Woodrow Wilson School

Jan-Werner Müller

Alan W. Patten

Philip N. Pettit, also University Center for Human Values

Thomas Romer, also Woodrow Wilson School

Ezra N. Suleiman

Leonard Wantchekon

Keith E. Whittington

Jennifer A. Widner, also Woodrow Wilson School

Deborah J. Yashar, also Woodrow Wilson School

Visiting Professor

Charles T. Rubin

Associate Professor

Paul Frymer

Grigore Pop-Eleches, also Woodrow Wilson School

Markus Prior, also Woodrow Wilson School

Kristopher W. Ramsay

Anna B. Stilz

Assistant Professor

Faisal Z. Ahmed

David B. Carter

Rafaela M. Dancygier, also Woodrow Wilson School

Matias Iaryczower

Jonathan P. Kastellec

Marc Ratkovic

Jacob N. Shapiro, also Woodrow Wilson School

LaFleur N. Stephens

Ali A. Valenzuela

Omar Wasow

Keren Yarhi-Milo, also Woodrow Wilson School

Associated Faculty

Marco Battaglini, Economics

Christopher L. Eisgruber, Woodrow Wilson School, University Center for Human Values

Daniel Garber, Philosophy

Robert O. Keohane, Woodrow Wilson School

Kim Lane Scheppele, Woodrow Wilson School, University Center for Human Values, Sociology

Michael A. Smith, Philosophy

Jeffrey L. Stout, Religion

Andreas Wimmer, Sociology


Information and Departmental Plan of Study

Prerequisites

Normally, students entering the department must have successfully completed on a graded basis two courses offered by the Department of Politics, one or both of which should be at the 200 level.

Program of Study

Course Selection. By the end of the senior year, all students in the department must complete, in addition to the prerequisites, eight departmental courses, of which two may be cognates.

Concentrators indicate a prospective primary field when they sign into the department in the spring of their sophomore year, and designate a primary field by the end of the first term of their junior year. Concentrators take courses in at least three of the fields listed below, designating one as their primary field of study, another as their secondary field, and an additional field. Students take a minimum of three courses in their primary field, two courses in their secondary field, and one course in a third field. One of three courses in the primary field normally is a 200-level course. Prerequisites may be used to satisfy field requirements. A course taken to satisfy the analytical requirement cannot be used to satisfy the field requirement. The department's website lists additional courses that will fulfill field requirements in a given year, including one-time-only courses. It also lists topics courses offered by other departments that have POL cross-listings and that therefore can be counted as departmental courses.

I. Political theory: 210, 301, 302, 303, 304, 306, 307, 308, 309, 313, 315, 316, 321, 410, 411, 412, 413

II. American politics: 220, 314, 315, 316, 318, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 330, 331, 335, 336, 349, 392, 420, 421, 422, 423

III. Comparative politics: 230, 349, 351, 352, 355, 356, 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, 366, 367, 368, 372, 374, 375, 378, 384, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434

IV. International relations: 240, 313, 380, 381, 383, 385, 388, 389, 392, 393, 396, 397,440, 441, 442, 443, 444

V. Methods in political science (cannot be the primary field): 250, 345, 346, 347, 350, 450, 451, 452, 453

Analytic Requirement. The department maintains a list of politics courses that have an emphasis on political analysis. Concentrators are required to take a politics course in systematic analysis, normally no later than the first term of their junior year. Courses in systematic analysis have an emphasis on how political scientists develop and test hypotheses and how various types of analytic investigation further the understanding of political ideals and processes. The course used to fulfill the analytic requirement cannot be used to fulfill primary-, secondary-, or third-field requirements. The analytic requirement may be satisfied by POL 345, POL 346, POL 347, or POL 350. We will also accept ECO 202, ECO 302, ECO 312, ORF 245, SOC 404, WWS 200, or WWS 332.

Cognates. The department maintains a list of all cognates approved by the departmental representatives for each student. Cognates must be approved before or during the semester in which they are taken, and no later than the last Friday of classes. Courses taken in the Freshman or Sophomore year cannot be designated as cognates. Cognate courses should not be at the introductory level. Cognates cannot be used to satisfy field distribution requirements. To seek approval for a cognate, students must complete the Politics Cognate Approval Application and send it along with a current syllabus to the director of undergraduate studies or the relevant politics academic advisor for their review. Once a cognate has been approved, it may not be rescinded. Approved cognates will be used in the departmental honors calculation.

Graduate Courses. Well-prepared undergraduates may take graduate seminars for full University and departmental credit. To enroll in a graduate seminar, the student must have the signature approval of the instructor in charge of the seminar, the director of undergraduate studies, and the student's residential dean. The graduate course approval form can be picked up from and returned to the student's residential college office.

Independent Work

Junior Year. In the fall, students normally participate in junior research workshops that serve as platforms to write junior papers and that are not counted as a course. In the spring, they pursue individual research programs. In workshops, a small group of students does related research projects, with faculty members providing common instructions in research procedures and techniques. In individual research programs, students work on topics they have chosen in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Senior Year. During the senior year, each student writes a thesis and takes a comprehensive examination. The senior thesis normally is written on a topic within a student's primary field.

The department encourages students to use the summer between junior and senior year for work on the senior thesis.

Senior Departmental Examination

The senior comprehensive examinations test knowledge in a concentrator's primary field. The senior comprehensive normally involves a one-day, take-home, closed-book examination.

Study Abroad

The department encourages students to consider studying abroad for one term or even for a full year in conjunction with departmental concentration in politics. If, under a program approved in advance by the dean of the college, a concentrator in politics studies abroad for the equivalent of an academic year at Princeton, the department is willing to credit as departmentals as many as four courses in political science or related fields when they are taken at a foreign university. Normally, the department is willing to substitute no more than one cognate and one departmental or two cognates for concentrators studying abroad for one term.

Program in Political Economy. The Department of Politics offers the Program in Political Economy for students who wish to further their understanding of social phenomena and individual behavior by combining and comparing the perspectives of its two constituent disciplines.

Requirements. To participate in this program, students must complete two politics courses, ECO 100 and 101, and MAT 103 before the end of their sophomore year. All five of these courses should be taken on a graded basis (e.g., not pass/D/fail). Students may substitute a higher-level math course that subsumes MAT 103, such as MAT 104, MAT 175, or MAT 215. NOTE: Students can apply for these prerequisites to be waived by committing to complete MAT 175, ECO 300/310, and ECO 301/311 before the end of the junior year. This will be considered by the political economy adviser on a case-by-case basis.

It is important for each student to select a combination of economics and politics courses that form a coherent and meaningful program. Before signing up for the first term of the junior year, the student should work out a tentative course outline for the next two years; this outline must be approved and signed by the political economy adviser.

A student in the political economy program is required to take at least seven upper-level courses in the politics department, at least five of which must be numbered 300 and above; two upper-level courses in the economics department; and one course in quantitative methods in either economics or politics. These courses will be counted as departmentals. This 10-course combination fulfills the requirements both for the political economy program and for the major and is used in calculating department honors.

All students must pass the following courses: (1) either Political Economy (POL 349) or Comparative Political Economy (POL 352); (2) Mathematical Models in the Study of Politics (POL 347); (3) at least one course in quantitative methods: either POL 345 or 346 or Economics 202, 302, or 312; (4) Intermediate Microeconomics (ECO 300 or ECO 310 or WWS 300); and (5) either Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECO 301 or ECO 311), or one of the following courses: WWS 301/ECO 352 (International Trade), WWS 302/ECO 359 (International Development), or WWS 307/ECO 349 (Public Economics). Students must complete intermediate microeconomics and either POL 349 or POL 352 by the end of the junior year.

Students in the political economy program must also fulfill the distribution requirement of the department.

While a student in the Program must write a thesis on a topic related to the student's primary field, the thesis must also incorporate significant Political Economy content. On or before the thesis draft deadline, the Political Economy content of the thesis must be certified by the Political Economy Advisor. The student should meet with the Political Economy Advisor well in advance of this deadline to discuss the Political Economy content of the thesis.

Concentrators who successfully complete the program's requirements will receive a departmental certificate.

Student Departmental Committee. All students in the department have an opportunity to elect five seniors and four juniors to serve as members of the Undergraduate Student Departmental Committee. This committee discusses and makes recommendations on matters affecting the undergraduate program in the department. The committee normally meets with the faculty Committee on the Undergraduate Program, and its members represent all undergraduate students in departmental meetings.


Courses


POL 210 Political Theory   Spring EM

An introduction to political theory that explores the relevance of theory to a critical understanding of political and social problems. The course will examine the major classical and contemporary expressions of liberal, conservative, and socialist theory and relate them to the problems of order, freedom, equality, and justice. Two lectures, one preceptorial. M. Lane, A. Stilz

POL 220 American Politics (also WWS 310)   Spring SA

An introduction to the national institutions and political processes of American government. Topics include the Constitution, the American political tradition, public opinion, interest groups, political institutions, civil rights, civil liberties, and public policy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. P. Frymer

POL 230 Introduction to Comparative Politics   Spring SA

This course will focus on the process of democratic transition and consolidation in a comparative and historical manner. In particular, we will analyze the democratic revolution that has swept the globe during the last 30 years by examining the communist and authoritarian backgrounds of newly democratized countries, the factors influencing the emergence of democracy, the problems associated with building stable democratic systems, and finally, the prospects for a regime shift in parts of the world still under autocratic rule. Two lectures, one preceptorial. G. Pop-Eleches

POL 240 International Relations (also WWS 312)   Spring SA

A comprehensive introduction to the major issues of contemporary international relations. The course presents competing theoretical perspectives and reviews the historical record to explore such puzzles as the causes of war, explanations of cooperation, the behavior of states, and the proper ethical standards for judging international relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Moravcsik

POL 250 Introduction to Game Theory   Not offered this year SA

This course serves as an introduction to strategic issues in politics as well as non-cooperative game theory. The course develops the basic concepts and equilibrium concepts of normal and extensive form games with both complete and incomplete information. We will look at collective action problems, bargaining, voting, legislative politics, deliberation, deterrence and campaigns. Evaluation is through problem sets, exams and a short paper in which students develop their own model and analysis. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 268 Political and Economic Development of the Middle East (see NES 265)

POL 301 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory (also CLA 301/HLS 303)   Not offered this year EM

This course focuses on classical political theory in ancient Greece and its appropriation and development in the Roman, medieval, and Renaissance periods. It examines Greek democracy, drawing on tragedy, rhetoric ,and history; the ethics and politics of Plato and Aristotle; and the Roman republican thought of Cicero and Livy. It considers the influence of Plato on Augustine and More, Aristotle on Aquinas and Marsilius, and Cicero and Livy on Machiavelli. Topics include nature and convention; democracy, oligarchy and tyranny; church and state; consent and representation; and virtue, property, and law. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 302 Continental Political Thought from Rousseau to Nietzsche   Not offered this year EM

An examination of the development of political thought in Europe from the second half of the 18th century to the end of the 19th. The course will focus on Kantian, Hegelian, and Marxist developments in this tradition. Emphasis on the important role played by different conceptions of freedom, human nature, and history in the political thought of the period, with particular attention to issues concerning autonomy and authority, the nature of the state, and the limits to state power. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 303 Modern Political Theory   Fall EM

A study of the writings of some major political theorists from the 17th through the 19th centuries, including Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, and J. S. Mill. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Beitz

POL 304 Conservative Political Thought   Not offered this year EM

A historical and analytic examination of conservative political theories. Topics include the classical and medieval roots of modern conservatism, the development of conservatism in Europe and America, fascism and the radical right, and the tensions between libertarianism and traditionalism in contemporary conservative thought. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 306 Democratic Theory (also PHI 360/CHV 306)   Fall EM

A study of the intellectual foundations of the modern democratic state. Topics include the meaning and justification of democracy, the rationality of voting, political representation, property rights, civil disobedience, and education. Two lectures, one preceptorial. P. Pettit

POL 307 The Just Society (also CHV 307)   Spring EM

An introduction to alternative theories of social justice and examination of the implications of those theories in areas of contemporary social and political controversy. Readings and lectures focus on utilitarian, libertarian, liberal egalitarian, communitarian, and feminist conceptions of what it means to live in a just society. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Patten

POL 308 Ethics and Public Policy (see WWS 370)

POL 309 Politics and Religion (also REL 309)   Spring EM

Close study of a number of texts that have illuminated the connection between religiosity and politics, and, in particular, the role of religious language and ideas to establish, preserve, reform, and redeem republics. Special attention will be given to the religious dimensions of revolutionary and messianic politics, and to the role that religiosity has played in the development of contemporary social movements and in the moral and political resistance to totalitarian regimes. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Müller

POL 313 Global Justice (also CHV 313)   Not offered this year EM

What, if any, norms of justice apply to the institutions and practice of world politics? Topics include "political realism" and skepticism about global morality; just wars and justice in warfare; ethics of humanitarian intervention; the nature and basis of human rights; world poverty and global distributive justice; and democracy and accountability in global institutions. Readings chosen from recent works in political philosophy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 314 American Constitutional Development   Spring SA

The development of American constitutionalism, considered historically as the product of legal, political, and intellectual currents and crises (e.g., the Founding, the Marshall and Taney eras, the slavery crises, the rise of corporate capitalism, the emergence of the modern state, the New Deal crisis, and new forms of rights and liberties). Topics include the growth of Supreme Court power, the court's relation to the states and the other federal branches, and the influence on constitutional understandings of economic developments, reform movements, wars, party competition, and legal and political thought. Two lectures, one preceptorial. K. Whittington

POL 315 Constitutional Interpretation   Fall SA

A study of the development of the United States Constitution, chiefly through close analysis of selected judicial decisions. One 90-minute lecture, one two-hour preceptorial. R. George

POL 316 Civil Liberties   Spring EM

A study of selected problems concerning civil liberties in contemporary America, with specific focus on privacy and on problems derived from living in a pluralistic society. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute class. R. George

POL 317 Discrimination and the Law   Not offered this year EM

How can law change (or reinforce) the ways in which race, gender, and sexual orientation affect status? This course examines the purposes of antidiscrimination law and asks if it is appropriate to extend antidiscrimination protection from race to other categories. Conflicts with tradition, autonomy of community, and liberty are also considered. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 318 Law and Society   Not offered this year SA

An exploration of the relationships between law and society, using judicial and other materials from the American legal system. Topics considered include the stages of legal development, law and morality, judicial decision making, formal resolution of disputes, social control through law, the political nature of law, and courts. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 320 Judicial Politics   Not offered this year SA

An introduction to the political science of law and courts. Topics typically include: bargaining and decision making on the U.S. Supreme Court; political struggles over doctrine within the judicial hierarchy; the politics of Supreme Court nominations; juries as political institutions; court packing, jurisdiction stripping, and judicial intimidation; political use of litigation by activists, firms, and interest groups; judicial oversight of the administrative state; judicial activism by state attorneys general; and the social and economic impact of courts. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 321 American Political Thought   Not offered this year EM

The origin and development of political ideas and institutions. Drawn from primary sources, the readings feature the ideas and deeds of those who from colonial times to the present have shaped the American concept of free government. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 322 Public Opinion   Fall SA

An examination of public opinion and mass political behavior, particularly in the American context. Topics include formation of political attitudes and ideology, conflict and consensus on basic issues, political participation and voting, the effects of the media, and the impact of public opinion on governmental policy. Two lectures, one preceptorial or laboratory. T. Mendelberg

POL 323 Party Politics   Not offered this year SA

An examination of party organization and activities, the forces that shape them, and their consequences. The course is concerned primarily with U.S. party politics in the contemporary period but gives some attention to American political history and foreign party systems. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 324 Congressional Politics   Not offered this year SA

An examination of the role of Congress in American politics, with a special focus on the political world of individual legislators. The course explores how legislators run their campaigns, interact with their constituents, operate within Congress, and make public policy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 325 The Presidency and Executive Power   Not offered this year SA

A study of the place of the presidency in the American political order that stresses tension between power and accountability inherent in the office and the system. Topics include: separation of powers, presidential selection, impeachment, relations with Congress and bureaucracy, emergency powers, presidential character, and leadership. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 330 Electing the President: Voter Psychology and Candidate Strategy   Not offered this year SA

An examination of how U.S. election campaigns are conducted and how they affect political reasoning and voting behavior. Empirical analyses of public opinion data and campaign communication provide the foundation for studying campaigns. The goal of the course is to offer a broad theoretical understanding of the conduct of campaigns and their effects. Recent elections serve to illustrate key insights. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 331 Urban Politics   Not offered this year SA

A study of the interplay of urbanization and politics in the United States. Particular attention is given to the problems of metropolitan growth and the changing roles of local governments, the states, and the federal government. Assumes a working knowledge of American politics. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 332 Topics in American Statesmanship   Fall SA

What is statesmanship? Can qualities of statesmanship be critically assessed? If so, by what analytical methods of political science? This course explores statesmanship through a study of the biographies, principles, practices, and leadership styles of men and women who have been widely regarded as having exemplified the craft. Among the goals is to deepen understanding of how the practical necessities of democratic politics have been combined with appeals to democracy's loftiest ideals. Staff

POL 335 Women, Gender, and Politics (also GSS 337)   Not offered this year SA

An examination of the relationships among women, gender, and political processes and public policies in the United States. Topics include the differing interpretations of women's interests promoted by the feminist and pro-family movements, the gender dimension of contemporary American economic and social policies, and the problem of political equality in the context of biological sex differences and social inequality. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 336 Race and American Politics (also AAS 336)   Not offered this year SA

Examines how the American political system has arranged itself in response to racial distinctions and how it has influenced these distinctions. Pays primary attention to contemporary developments, but places them in historical perspective. Topics include partisan alignment, racial stereotypes, the civil rights movement, and the problem of interest representation. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 338 Race and the American Legal Process: Emancipation to the Voting Rights Act (see AAS 362)

POL 345 Quantitative Analysis and Politics   Fall QR

What accounts for who votes and their choice of candidate? Do politicians make policy based on constituency interests or their own ideologies? Would universal health insurance improve the health of the poor? Policy makers and academic researchers use statistics to answer these questions. However, the validity of their conclusions depends upon underlying assumptions and correct application of statistical methods. This course introduces the basics of applied statistics to students who have had little previous exposure to the subject. Topics will include causal inference, descriptive inference, survey analysis, and probability. M. Ratkovic

POL 346 Applied Quantitative Analysis   Spring QR

Develops the use of statistical techniques appropriate for empirical exploration of political topics. Each statistical topic is motivated by a significant question in political science that can be addressed by an available data set. Computers will be used both as part of the lecture and for completing classwork. Emphasis is on hands-on training that will give students the capacity to use these statistical techniques in other courses and independent work. Prerequisites: 345 or instructor's permission. Two lectures, one preceptorial. O. Wasow

POL 347 Mathematical Models in the Study of Politics   Fall QR

An introduction to the use of mathematical models and, especially, game theory in the study of politics. The basics of game theory are presented through applications to a broad range of political phenomena: voting, legislative politics, political campaigns, comparison of electoral systems, the evolution of cooperation, and international relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. M. Iaryczower

POL 349 Political Economy   Fall SA

This course provides a rigorous introduction to some of the central ideas in political economy. Game theoretic models of voting are used to illustrate the way that democratic institutions filter interests. Topics may include the measurement of income inequality, the median voter theorem, models of income redistribution, political agency, and the link between institutions and economic performance. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 350 Research Methods in Political Science   Spring SA

An introductory undergraduate course in research methods for politics concentrators, designed to help prepare students for junior papers and the senior thesis. The material is chosen to convey an understanding of research design, choice of method, and data analysis. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be taught, but this is not a statistics course. It provides an introduction to a range of research methodologies as they are applied to political science topics. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Kastellec

POL 351 The Politics of Development (also WWS 311)   Fall SA

A comparative study of politics in selected developing countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Topics include colonialism, nationalism, class and ethic conflict, political instability, military coups, revolutionary change, and development strategies such as land reforms, green revolution, import substitution, and management of external dependencies. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Widner

POL 352 Comparative Political Economy   Not offered this year SA

Explores the dynamic relationship in theory between market-formation and reform on the one hand, and economic ideas and cultural values on the other. The course examines classical and contemporary works in comparative political economy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 353 The Politics of Modern Islam (see NES 269)

POL 355 Comparative Politics of Legislatures   Fall SA

This course examines the workings of legislatures in a comparative setting.The course will look at the internal workings of legislative institutions, and at the relationship between electoral systems and legislative outcomes. We will consider and compare parliamentary and presidential systems, unicameral and bicameral legislatures. The course will look at the determinants of cabinet duration in parliamentary systems, and the emergence of committee systems. We will also take up the linkage between electoral systems and the structure of political parties, and the reasons for political parties to emerge from within and outside the legislature. J. Londregan

POL 356 Comparative Ethnic Conflict   Not offered this year SA

This course introduces students to the study of ethnic conflict. It will examine different theories of ethnically based identification and mobilization; cover different types of ethnic conflict such as riots, genocide, hate crime and war; and study past and present cases of ethnic conflict around the world. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 360 Social Movements and Revolutions   Fall SA

This course investigates the politics of protest and revolution, examining the conditions under which protest movements emerge, their choice of protest tactics, the effects of repression and concessions, and the determinants of movement success. The second part of the courses focuses on revolutions, examining the forms that they assume and the conditions under which they develop and prove successful. Examples discussed include the civil rights, women's and environmental movements; the French, Russian, and Iranian revolutions; the collapse of communism; and the "colored" revolutions and other waves of revolution in the contemporary world. M. Beissinger

POL 361 Political Economy of East Asia   Not offered this year SA

Examines the political economy of development in East Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and China) and the newly industrializing countries of Southeast Asia. Topics include the historical roots of development, competing explanations for rapid growth in the region, the rise of China as an economic power, the Asian Financial Crisis, and the pressures of globalization and democracy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 362 Chinese Politics   Spring SA

Traditional politics; the rise of warlords, nationalists, and radicals; causes of the "Liberation," land reform, Hundred Flowers, Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, and Four Modernizations; policies of Mao and Deng for development, health, law, and rights. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 363 Japanese Politics   Not offered this year SA

A study of politics and government in Japan, focusing on the period since World War II. Attention will be given to the development of the party system, the formation of public policy, and the evolution of the national economy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 364 Politics of the Middle East (also NES 322)   Not offered this year SA

Focuses on social and economic change in the Middle East as reflected in development strategies, political competition and conflict, and state intervention in economic and social life. The emphasis is on domestic and comparative politics in the Middle East rather than its international relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 366 Politics in Africa   Not offered this year SA

A comparative approach to African political systems. The meanings of the concepts of modernization, national integration, and development are explored. Topics include the inheritances of colonial rule, independence and the new tasks, political patterns in the postindependence period, prospects for political change, and African interstate relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 367 Latin American Politics (also LAS 367)   Not offered this year SA

A study of the governments and politics of Latin America. The political systems of the Latin American countries will be examined, as well as the common political problems and processes of the area. Special attention will be given to the role of revolution, military rule, and constitutional democracy in Latin American political development. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 368 Political Economy of Latin America (also LAS 368)   Not offered this year SA

A study of the use of public policy instruments by Latin American governments to promote development. Topics include the structuralist-monetarist controversy, the Alliance for Progress and modernization, dependency in theory and practice, import-substitution and export promotion, the rise of bureaucratic authoritarianism, and alternative strategies for managing the debt crisis. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 372 Political Economy of Western Europe   Not offered this year SA

Different patterns of industrialization produce differences in the political organization of capitalism, i.e., in the position and role of labor and in relations between business and the state. This course explores the historical roots of these differences and their implications for contemporary politics and policy. It focuses on France, West Germany, Britain, and Sweden. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 374 Russian and Post-Soviet Politics   Fall SA

This course surveys the politics of Russia and the post-Soviet states, focusing on the four major political challenges that these states confront: state-building, nation-building, democratization, and economic development. Particular attention is given to the ways in which the Soviet experience continues to shape the politics of the Eurasian region, nation-building and identity politics, modes of authoritarian rule and democratization, the politics of energy, and the role of external actors and Russian policies in affecting the political evolution of the region. M. Beissinger

POL 375 Politics after Communism   Not offered this year SA

An examination of the political and economic change in Russia and some of the former Soviet republics from Gorbachev to the present. After briefly reviewing the main institutions of the Soviet system and theories of its collapse, the course examines specific reforms and the social impact of rapid systemic change. Topics include shock therapy (privatization and economic liberalization), nationalism, crime, and legislative reform among others. The course will also compare the process of change in the former Soviet Union with democratic and market transitions in Latin America and elsewhere. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 376 Political Islam (see NES 268)

POL 378 Politics in India   Not offered this year SA

An introduction to politics in the large subcontinental country of India. The course will address themes that are important both to India and to a general study of politics in a developing country. The following questions help organize the course: How does one make sense of democracy in a poor, multiethnic setting? How has democratic politics shaped and been shaped by a society divided along numerous lines, such as caste, class, and linguistic and religious identities? And how well has the democratic state fared in promoting both economic growth and social welfare? Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 380 Human Rights   Not offered this year SA

A study of the politics and history of human rights. What are human rights? How can dictatorships be resisted from the inside and the outside? Can we prevent genocide? Is it morally acceptable and politically wise to launch humanitarian military interventions to prevent the slaughter of foreign civilians? What are the laws of war, and how can we punish the war criminals who violate them? Cases include the Ottoman Empire, Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, Bosnia, and Rwanda. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 381 Theories of International Relations   Not offered this year SA

Examination of selected theories and issues of international relations including the following: causes of war, theories of imperialism, the issue of order and change, the relationship of morality and statecraft. Course readings drawn from historical and theoretical materials. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 383 International Cooperation   Not offered this year SA

Examines theories about how international cooperation can be initiated and maintained. Topics include the achievement of cooperation under conditions of anarchy, regimes and norms, international and multilateral organizations, tacit bargaining, formal and informal agreements, and strategies for punishing noncompliance. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 384 European Politics and Society in the 20th Century (see EPS 300)

POL 385 International Political Economy   Fall SA

A study of the relationship between political and economic processes in international affairs. Attention will be given to problems that lie on the boundary between politics and economics. Two lectures, one preceptorial. F. Ahmed

POL 388 Causes of War   Not offered this year SA

Why do states and peoples go to war? Conversely, how can war be avoided? This course surveys some of the most important explanations--including human nature, the anarchic international system, domestic politics, economics, technology, nationalism, and terrorism--and evaluates them in light of historical wars, and of crises resolved short of war. The course will examine cases ranging from the Peloponnesian War to the ongoing American-led war against terrorism. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 389 International Relations of East Asia (see WWS 317)

POL 391 Comparative Constitutional Law (see WWS 322)

POL 392 American Foreign Policy   Not offered this year SA

A systematic study of major issues and problems of American foreign policy in the contemporary world. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 393 Grand Strategy (see WWS 315)

POL 396 International Organization   Not offered this year SA

This course examines the role played by international organizations (IOs)--especially inter-state multilateral institutions--in the international system. It focuses on the effectiveness of IOs in managing global issues in a rapidly changing world and addresses questions such as: Why do IOs exist? What do they do? How do we gauge their success? Are they simply irrelevant? The course begins by covering several theoretical approaches to understanding IOs, their functions, and their shortcomings, then moves on to a critical examination of the work of different types of IOs. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 397 National Security   Not offered this year SA

An introduction to classic texts (for example, Sun Tzu, Clausewitz) and dominant theoretical approaches in the study of national security. Why states fight and how they fight are examined with an emphasis on how they generate and employ military power in combat. The determinants of battlefield effectiveness, the limits of military power, and the historical evolution of warfare are also considered. Attention is paid to alternative conceptions of security (including human security) and warfare, including civil wars, insurgencies, and genocide. Cases are drawn from diverse Western and non-Western historical eras. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 410 Seminar in Political Theory   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 411 Seminar in Political Theory   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 412 Seminar in Political Theory   Not offered this year EM

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 413 Seminar in Political Theory   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 420 Seminar in American Politics   Fall, Spring SA

Investigation of a major theme in American politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. C. Cameron, D. Strolovitch

POL 421 Seminar in American Politics   Fall SA

Investigation of a major theme in American politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. C. Achen

POL 422 Seminar in American Politics (also GSS 422)   Fall SA

Investigation of a major theme in American politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. T. Mendelberg

POL 423 Seminar in American Politics   Fall SA

Investigation of a major theme in American politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. K. Whittington

POL 424 Topics in African American Religion (see AAS 368)

POL 430 Seminar in Comparative Politics   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 431 Seminar in Comparative Politics   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. Staff

POL 432 Seminar in Comparative Politics   Spring SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. D. Aksoy

POL 433 Seminar in Comparative Politics   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 434 Seminar in Comparative Politics   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 440 Seminar in International Relations   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 441 Seminar in International Relations   Fall SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. J. Gowa

POL 442 Seminar in International Relations   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 443 Seminar in International Relations   Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 444 International Institutions and Law (see WWS 420)

POL 450 Seminar in Methods in Political Science   Not offered this year QR

Investigation of a major theme in methods of political science. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 451 Seminar in Methods in Political Science   Not offered this year QR

Investigation of a major theme in methods of political science. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. Staff

POL 452 Seminar in Methods in Political Science   Not offered this year

Investigation of a major theme in methods of political science. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 453 Seminar in Methods in Political Science   Not offered this year

Investigation of a major theme in methods of political science. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar Staff

POL 463 Public Leadership and Public Policy in the U.S. (see WWS 363)

POL 465 Early Modern Philosophy (see PHI 332)

POL 466 Foundations of the Modern State (see CHV 466)

POL 469 The Age of Rights: Nature, Enlightenment, and Revolution (see CHV 350)