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Program in Visual Arts

Director

Joseph S. Scanlan

Acting Director

Martha Friedman (spring)

Executive Committee

Michael W. Cadden, Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater

Jill S. Dolan, English, Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater 

Jeffrey K. Eugenides, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing 

Su Friedrich, Lewis Center for the Arts 

Brian E. Herrera, Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater

Chang-rae Lee, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing 

Susan Marshall, Lewis Center for the Arts, Dance 

Paul B. Muldoon, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing 

Joyce Carol Oates, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing 

James Richardson, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing 

Joseph S. Scanlan, Lewis Center for the Arts 

P. Adams Sitney, Lewis Center for the Arts 

Tracy K. Smith, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing

Susan Wheeler, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing 

Edmund V. White, Lewis Center for the Arts, Creative Writing 

Stacy E. Wolf, Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater 

Professor

Su Friedrich, also Lewis Center for the Arts

Joseph S. Scanlan, also Lewis Center for the Arts

P. Adams Sitney, also Lewis Center for the Arts

Lecturer

Eve M. Aschheim

Martha Friedman

Hodder Fellow

Chinonye Chukwu


The Program in Visual Arts, part of the Lewis Center for the Arts, allows undergraduates to explore visual art and media and develop their creative skills in connection with a general program of humanistic education. Courses are offered in painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, graphic design, filmmaking, and film history and criticism. Studio courses emphasize direct, hands-on art making under the guidance of practicing visual arts professionals.

Most courses in the program are open to all students at Princeton. A few courses are by application only, and a few are reserved for certificate and Program 2 students only. Most courses are letter graded (not pass/D/fail) and may be taken in fulfillment of the distribution requirement in LA (Literature and Arts). Summer courses and study abroad are accepted for Program 2 students, certificate students, and students who have previously completed at least one VIS course. AP credit is not accepted.

For students interested in pursuing a thesis in studio arts, there are two options. The first is Program 2, the concentration offered by the Department of Art and Archaeology in cooperation with the Program in Visual Arts that focuses on the studio arts. The second option is a visual arts Certificate earned in addition to a student's departmental concentration. Students wishing either to study film history and theory may pursue this track within the visual arts certificate program in collaboration with departments that accept a written thesis in film.

Admission to the Program

Admission to both Program 2 in art and archaeology and the visual arts certificate program is selective. During the first week following spring break, sophomores submit an application and a portfolio of creative work (or an essay on cinema in the case of those applying for the track in film history and theory) to the Lewis Center for the Arts administrative office. By early April, the admissions committee will notify those students accepted into the program. For specific prerequisites, please see the individual areas below.

Program of Study

Program 2: Visual Arts

Program 2 is an intensive studio concentration in the visual arts that culminates in a creative senior thesis. For program requirements, see the Program 2 description under the Department of Art and Archaeology.

The Visual Arts Certificate

Overview. A certificate in visual arts will be awarded to students who successfully complete a substantial program of studio work and other requirements, as summarized below, while concentrating in another academic department. Students interested in a certificate in visual arts should submit a portfolio in the spring term of the sophomore year. Students must have completed at least one visual arts studio course before being admitted to the program. One course in art and archaeology is also highly recommended.

Course Requirements. A total of eight courses combined from the Program in Visual Arts and the Department of Art and Archaeology, as follows:

a) Four visual arts studio courses, which must include courses in at least two different media, and at least two 300- or 400-level courses.

b) VIS 392 Issues in Contemporary Art. This course is required for all Program 2 and certificate students. The course coincides with admission to the junior studios and concentrates on the history, challenges, and rewards of studio practice. Through readings, discussions, studio critiques, artist's books, and a culminating exhibition of works in progress, VIS 392 provides the context and the work ethic for each student's independent creative development, as well as beginning to be able to articulate the historical precedents and ambitions of their work.

c) VIS 416 Senior Thesis Seminar. This course provides a formal structure in which Program 2 and certificate students will present, discuss, and develop ideas for their visual thesis exhibitions.

d) Two art and archaeology courses, one of which must be in the modern period (19th century to the present).

Junior Independent Work. In the fall, students will be assigned one adviser and will have at least three studio visits with secondary elect advisers chosen from the Program in Visual Arts faculty. Each student is also assigned a studio work space in the Room 401 loft of the Lewis Center. In lieu of writing a fall paper, students will conceive and produce a 32-page artist's book for their fall independent work. The independent work is done in consultation with each student's advisers, with their peers, and with the director of the program. The advisers' spring term grade for the junior independent work represents an evaluation of the entire year's studio work. The junior independent work is exhibited in a group show at the end of the junior spring term.

Senior Independent Work--The Creative Thesis. In the fall, students enroll in VIS 416 Senior Thesis Seminar, are assigned one adviser and select one adviser from the Program in Visual Arts faculty. Students are assigned shared, semiprivate studios on the second floor of the Lewis Center. The creative thesis work is done in consultation with the student's advisers and their peers, and with the director of the program. Students present their work in an exhibition during the spring term, usually a two-person show with another certificate student or Program 2 student. The grade for the senior independent work represents an evaluation of the entire year's studio work and is the average of two grades: (1) the average of the grades given by the student's advisers and (2) the average of the grades given by the rest of the visual arts faculty who view the senior exhibition.

Track in Film and Video

Students interested in film criticism and analysis may pursue the film and video track within the visual arts certificate program while concentrating in another academic department. Requirements for this track are summarized below. To enter this track, students must have the approval of their department of concentration to submit a written critical/historical thesis on a film-related topic. Normally, students in this track must complete a production course and a course in film history or theory before being admitted to the program.

The five visual arts courses that students take in the film and video track must include:

a) One course in film/video production (VIS 261/262, VIS 361/362, VIS 462)

b) Two courses in film history (any course listed by the Committee for Film Studies) and one visual arts seminar in film theory or history.

c) At least two other courses (either in film production or academic courses in film history).

Please note: Three cognates are accepted within the above group. Junior projects and senior theses may be submitted as historical or theoretical essays based either on one of the media or on both media. Where these projects can fulfill the requirements of the visual arts certificate and the student's department of concentration, they will be jointly advised by faculty members from the program and the student's home department. Where the independent work is not completed in conjunction with requirements for the student's home department, the work will be supervised by two faculty members from the Program in Visual Arts.

Certificate of Proficiency

Students who fulfill the requirements of the program receive a certificate of proficiency in visual arts upon graduation.


Courses


VIS 201 Introductory Drawing (also ARC 201)   Fall LA

This course approaches drawing as a way of thinking and seeing. Students will be introduced to a range of drawing issues, as well as a variety of media, including charcoal, graphite, ink, and oil stick. Subject matter includes still life, the figure, landscape, and architecture. Representation, abstraction, and working from imagination will be explored. A structured independent project will be completed at the end of the term. Two studio classes, five hours total per week. E. Aschheim, N. Carter

VIS 202 Introductory Drawing (also ARC 202)   Spring LA

This course approaches drawing as a way of thinking and seeing. Students will be introduced to a range of drawing issues, as well as a variety of media, including charcoal, graphite, ink, and oil stick. Subject matter includes still life, the figure, landscape, and architecture. Representation, abstraction, and working from imagination will be explored. A structured independent project will be completed at the end of the term. Two studio classes, five hours total per week. E. Aschheim, K. Kauper

VIS 203 Introductory Painting (also ARC 327)   Fall LA

An introduction to the materials and methods of painting. The areas to be covered are color and its interaction, the use of form and scale, painting from a model, painting objects with a concern for their mass, and interaction with light. Two three-hour studio classes. E. Aschheim

VIS 204 Introductory Painting (also ARC 328)   Spring LA

An introduction to the materials and methods of painting. The areas to be covered are color and its interaction, the use of form and scale, painting from a model, painting objects with a concern for their mass, and interaction with light. Two studio classes, five hours total per week. D. Heyman, J. Halvorson

VIS 211 Introductory Photography   Fall LA

An introduction to the processes of photography through a series of problems directed toward the handling of light-sensitive material, camera, and printing. Weekly laboratory sessions will explore the critical issues of the medium in relation to both student work and the work of guest photographers. One three-hour class and two hours of independent laboratory. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. D. Lawson, D. Oliver, S. Charlesworth

VIS 212 Introductory Photography   Spring LA

An introduction to the processes of photography through a series of problems directed toward the handling of light-sensitive material, camera, and printing. Weekly laboratory sessions will explore the critical issues of the medium in relation to both student work and the work of guest photographers. One three-hour class and three hours of independent laboratory. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. D. Oliver, D. Lawson

VIS 214 Graphic Design: Visual Form   Spring LA

This course introduces students to techniques for decoding and creating graphic messages in a variety of media, and delves into issues related to visual literacy through the hands-on making and analysis of graphic form. Graphic design relies on mastering the subtle manipulation of abstract shapes and developing sensitivity to the relationships between them. Students are exposed to graphics from the late 19th-century to the present in slide lectures. Studio assignments and group critique will foster an individual ability to realize sophisticated forms and motivate these towards carrying specific meanings. D. Reinfurt

VIS 215 Graphic Design (also ARC 215/CWR 215)   Fall, Spring LA

This studio course will introduce students to the essential aspects and skills of graphic design, and will analyze and discuss the increasingly vital role that non-verbal, graphic information plays in all areas of professional life, from fine art and book design to social networking and the Internet. Students in the course will explore visual organization through a series of focused, interrelated assignments dealing with composition, page layout, type design, and image. Hands on production will include an array of do-it-yourself printing and distribution technologies, from letterpress and mimeograph to photocopying and websites. D. Reinfurt, A. Chung

VIS 219 Art for Everyone   Fall, Spring LA

This studio class will address the increasing social pressure on art to become more widely distributed, immediately accessible, and democratically produced. For the past fifty years, expanding definitions of what art might be fueled by a greater emphasis on active audience participation have encouraged an atmosphere in which anyone can claim to be an artist. Through studio work in a wide range of graphic and digital media, supported by readings and discussions, this class will take a hands-on approach to the question of whether art by everyone for everyone constitutes a dreamed-of utopia, a universal banality, or a cultural nightmare. F. Backström

VIS 221 Introductory Sculpture   Fall LA

A studio introduction to sculpture, particularly the study of form, space, and the influence of a wide variety of materials and processes on the visual properties of sculpture. Students will develop an understanding of contemporary sculpture and a basic technical facility in a variety of materials and processes. Two studio classes, five hours per week. N. Carter

VIS 222 Introductory Sculpture   Spring LA

A studio introduction to sculpture, particularly the study of form, space, and the influence of a wide variety of materials and processes on the visual properties of sculpture. Students will develop an understanding of contemporary sculpture and a basic technical facility in a variety of materials and processes. Two studio classes, five hours per week. M. Friedman, J. Scanlan

VIS 242 Film Genres: The First Five Decades of Cinema   Not offered this year LA

A historical examination of a film genre--e.g., comedy, documentary, detective film (also called film noir). The object of the course will be the understanding of the uniquely cinematic aspects of each genre, studied against the backdrop of parallel literary genres (e.g., comedy from Aristophanes to Beckett; documentary fiction and essays; 19th- and 20th-century detective fiction). One genre will be the topic of the course each year. Two 90-minute classes, one film screening. P. Sitney

VIS 244 Visions of Transformation: Religious and Secular (see REL 222)

VIS 261 Introductory Video and Film Production   Fall LA

A film/video course introducing the techniques of shooting and editing digital video. Works of film/video art are analyzed in order to explore the development of, and innovations in, cinematic language. Production is oriented toward film/video as a visual art, including narrative, documentary, and experimental genres. Several short video projects produced during the semester. Two studio classes, five hours per week. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. K. Sanborn

VIS 262 Introductory Video and Film Production   Spring LA

A film/video course introducing the techniques of shooting and editing digital video. Works of film/video art are analyzed in order to explore the development of, and innovations in, cinematic language. Production is oriented toward film/video as a visual art, including narrative, documentary, and experimental genres. Several short video projects produced during the semester. Two studio classes, five hours per week. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. K. Sanborn

VIS 263 Documentary Filmmaking   Fall LA

This course will give students an introduction to documentary film and video production, with a special emphasis on the practical challenges of producing films in the real world. Students will learn fundamental filmmaking techniques from a professor with thirteen years experience running her own film production company, as well as a handful of guest professionals in the fields of cinematography, casting, and editing. Production and critique of student work will be augmented by film screenings, readings, and discussion of the effects that practical realities can have on the creative process. E. Abt

VIS 264 Narrative Filmmaking   Spring LA

This studio course will be equal parts directing and screenwriting, with a special emphasis on social issue-driven material. Students will learn how to bring a script to life in collaboration with actors, production crews, and their fellow students. The course will also critically examine a selection of powerful narrative films and analyze their different approaches to visual storytelling. Specific topics covered will be: the basic tenets of film direction, writing for the screen, effective ways to work with actors, the post-production process, and how journalistic research methods can inform the early stages of the filmmaking process. E. Abt

VIS 300 Muscle/Memory: Sculpture   Fall LA

Students in VIS 300 will create sculptures that relate directly to the body and compel performance, interaction, and movement. Students in the associated DAN 300 will create dances that are informed by garments, portable objects and props. The two classes will come together periodically to compare notes and consider how context informs perceptions of sculpture as performance and the body as object. A lecture series of prominent choreographers and artists will accompany the courses. One two-hour class and one three-hour class per week; course is open enrollment. M. Friedman

VIS 303 Intermediate Painting   Not offered this year LA

This course is designed to allow students to explore more deeply the process and meaning of painting. Students will complete a set of structured assignments and are encouraged to develop an independent direction. Contemporary critical theory is integrated into the course. Two studio classes, five hours per week. Prerequisite: 203, 204 and instructor's permission. E. Aschheim

VIS 304 Intermediate Painting   Not offered this year LA

This course is designed to allow students to explore more deeply the process and meaning of painting. Students will complete a set of structured assignments and are encouraged to develop an independent direction. Contemporary critical theory is integrated into the course. Two studio classes, five hours per week. Prerequisite: 203, 204 and instructor's permission. E. Aschheim

VIS 309 Introductory Printmaking   Spring LA

An introduction to fundamental techniques of copper plate etching, and relief printing. Assignments focus on applications of various printmaking techniques, while encouraging independent development of subject matter. Critiques will occur throughout the term. Students are encouraged to draw regularly outside of class to cultivate themes and content applicable to their prints. Field trips to the University's museum and the library's graphics collection will complement class work. Two studio classes, five hours per week. D. Heyman

VIS 312 Introduction to Color Photography   Not offered this year LA

Theory, processes, and applications of color photography as an artistic medium, exploring camera technique, color film, and darkroom printing methods. Students investigate the formal issues presented by color as an element of the medium and analyze visual content in the broader project of photographic image-making. Prerequisite: 211 or 212 and instructor's permission. One three-hour class. J. Lee

VIS 313 Intermediate Photography   Fall LA

A continuation of 211 or 212, this course focuses on photo chemistry, printmaking methods, and the view camera. The connections between traditions of art, philosophy, science, and photography will continue to be important. One three-hour class and three hours of independent laboratory. Prerequisites: 211, 212, or equivalent experience and instructor's permission. , A. Macintyre Staff

VIS 315 Digital Photography   Not offered this year LA

An advanced seminar and lab that explores the aesthetic and theoretical implications of digital technology in relation to photography. The emphasis is on making the photographic print in the digital work space. Class will consist of both independent and collaborative projects. One two-hour class, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: 211 or 212, or instructor's permission. D. Oliver

VIS 318 Lighting Design (see THR 318)

VIS 319 Scenic Design (see THR 319)

VIS 331 Ceramic Sculpture   Not offered this year LA

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning the fundamentals of working with clay. A wide variety of hand-building techniques will be taught, enabling students to make utilitarian vessels as well as sculptural forms. Students will learn about glazing and colored engobe application methods and how to operate electric and gas kilns. Studio work will be complemented by readings, field trips, and slide presentations.Two studio classes, five hours per week. Prerequisites: VIS 201/202, or VIS 203/204, or VIS 211/212, or VIS 215/216, or VIS 221/222, or VIS 261/VIS 262. A. Welch

VIS 332 Ceramic Sculpture   Spring LA

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning the fundamentals of working with clay. A wide variety of hand-building techniques will be taught, enabling students to make utilitarian vessels as well as sculptural forms. Students will learn about glazing and colored engobe application methods and how to operate electric and gas kilns. Studio work will be complemented by readings, field trips, and slide presentations. Two studio classes, five hours per week. Prerequisites: VIS 201/202, or VIS 203/204, or VIS 211/212, or VIS 215/216, or VIS 221/222, or VIS 261/VIS 262. A. Welch

VIS 340 Experimental Film   Fall LA

A seminar in the experimental or avant-garde film. This course will focus on the role of abstraction dreams, and self-reflexivity in the evolution of the non-commercial, modernist cinema. It will incorporate aspects of painting, poetry, sculpture that have influenced filmmakers working on the edges of the Surrealist, Cubist, Constructivist, Abstract Expressionist, and Minimalist moments in modern art. The reading will be drawn from the theoretical texts of filmmakers, such as Vertov, Leger, Einstein, Deren, Brakhage, Kubelka and Frampton. P. Sitney

VIS 341 Women and Film (see GSS 306)

VIS 342 The Cinema from World War II until the Present (also COM 361)   Not offered this year LA

The history of sound and color film produced since World War II. Emphasis on Italian neorealism, French New Wave, American avant-garde, and the accomplishments of such major filmmakers as Bergman, Hitchcock, Bresson, and Antonioni. Modernism in film will be a central consideration. One three-hour class, weekly film screenings. P. Sitney

VIS 343 Major Filmmakers   Fall LA

This seminar will treat in depth the work of two or three filmmakers of major importance. Specific subjects will vary. P. Sitney

VIS 344 Special Topics in Film History (also HLS 364)   Not offered this year LA

This seminar will deal in some detail with an aspect of film history, focusing on an important movement or exploring a significant issue. Specific topics and prerequisities will vary. Staff

VIS 346 Brazilian Cinema (see POR 319)

VIS 347 Topics in French Cinema (see FRE 391)

VIS 348 Screenwriting I: Screenwriting as a Visual Medium (see CWR 348)

VIS 349 Screenwriting: Creating Visual and Emotional Unity (see CWR 349)

VIS 361 Intermediate Video and Film Production   Not offered this year LA

A second-level film/video workshop focusing on digital media production. Short works of film/video art will be analyzed in class as a guide to the issues of aesthetic choice, editing structure, and challenging one's audience. Students complete two short videos and a longer final project, and view one film each week outside of class time. Prerequisites: 261 or 262 and instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar. K. Sanborn

VIS 362 Intermediate Video and Film Production   Spring LA

A second-level film/video workshop focusing on digital media production. Short works of film/video art will be analyzed in class as a guide to the issues of aesthetic choice, editing structure, and challenging one's audience. Students complete two short videos and a longer final project, and view one film each week outside of class time. Prerequisites: 261 or 262 and instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar. S. Friedrich

VIS 370 Painting Without Canvas   LA

This course investigates painting as a medium in the widest possible sense; as pictorial representation, assemblage, concrete color, spatial intervention; installation, performance and multimedia. Students will look at an array of objects, practices, and techniques that challenge conventional definitions of painting throughout, an underlying question of "what counts" as painting will be examined. However, this class is neither a historical narrative nor a deductive reasoning of what painting is or might mean. Rather, these questions will evolve through the studio processes of experimentation, contemplation and making. P. Lins

VIS 372 Costume Design (see THR 317)

VIS 392 Issues in Contemporary Art (also ART 392)   Fall LA

A required seminar for art and archaeology Program 2 majors and visual arts certificate students emphasizing contemporary art practices and ideas. The course addresses current issues in painting, drawing, sculpture, film, video, and photography, with an emphasis on developing a studio practice. Critiques of students' work, and excursions to artists' studio round out the course. One three-hour seminar. M. Friedman

VIS 401 Advanced Drawing: The Figure   Fall LA

A studio course in which students are encouraged to develop an independent direction while being challenged with projects on issues such as: narrative, abstraction, conceptual strategies, collage, computer-aided drawing, and drawing-based installation. Sources include photography, drawing from life, and utilizing one's own imagination. Study of developments in contemporary drawing will parallel the course projects. Prerequisites: 201, 202, and instructor's permission. Two three-hour classes. K. Kauper

VIS 403 Advanced Painting   Not offered this year LA

A studio course focused on advanced problems in painting practice, including pictorial structure in abstraction and representation, color in relationship to space and light, working process, and materials. This course, although structured, encourages development of independent work. Group critiques will be conducted. Students gain awareness of historical models as well as contemporary art, as they build and analyze the relationship between student work and contemporary painting culture. Two three-hour studio classes. Prerequisites: 303 or 304 and instructor's permission. Staff

VIS 404 Advanced Painting   Spring LA

A studio course focused on advanced problems in painting practice, including pictorial structure in abstraction and representation, color in relationship to space and light, working process, and materials. This course, although structured, encourages development of independent work. Group critiques will be conducted. Students gain awareness of historical models as well as contemporary art, as they build and analyze the relationship between student work and contemporary painting culture. Two three-hour studio classes. Prerequisites: 303 or 304 and instructor's permission. Staff

VIS 411 Advanced Questions in Photography   LA

Student-initiated problems in photography will be explored in close working relationship with the instructor. Emphasis will be on integrating practice and critical thought. One three-hour class, three hours of independent laboratory. Prerequisites: VIS 211 or VIS 212; and VIS 313 or VIS 315; or permission of instructor. J. Welling

VIS 415 Advanced Graphic Design   LA

This studio course builds on the skills and concepts of VIS 215 Graphic Design. Advanced Graphic Design is structured around three studio assignments that connect graphic design to other bodies of scientific knowledge, aesthetic experience, and scholarship. Studio work is supplemented by critiques, readings and lectures. Motivated students will refine their approaches to information design and visual problem solving, as well as develop the critical acumen for decoding and producing graphic design in a variety of traditional and electronic media. D. Reinfurt

VIS 416 Senior Thesis Seminar   Fall LA

This seminar will give senior Program 2 concentrators and certificate students in the visual arts a more structured and collegial environment for developing their thesis exhibitions. Over the course of the semester students will research and develop their art, their influences, and their aesthetic underpinnings to be presented as a formal proposal for their thesis project for group discussion. Material choices, exhibition design, and publicity strategies also will be addressed. Assigned readings will support and challenge received ideas of what art is and what the form and content of an art exhibition might entail. P. Lins

VIS 421 Advanced Sculpture   Not offered this year LA

A studio course in which formal problems are raised and explored through a range of materials. The central focus is on analysis and exploration of the nature of sculptural space. Two three-hour studio classes. Prerequisites: 221 or 222 and instructor's permission. M. Friedman

VIS 441 Notes on Color (also CWR 441/DAN 441/THR 441)   LA

This seminar will explore the idea of color through a wide range of scientific, philosophical and aesthetic theories. While the eyes of normally sighted human beings render color in roughly the same manner, our reactions and ability to "see" color vary. Far from being a fixed entity, color is a deeply personal and psychological component of human perception and art. In addition to readings, presentations, and discussions, students will be required to keep two kinds of color diaries-one using portable watercolors and another using language-to chronicle their color perceptions, as well as write a paper on an artwork they encounter on campus. J. Welling

VIS 442 Film Theory   Not offered this year LA

An examination of the central texts and abiding issues of the theory of cinema. Properties of the shot as a unit of film construction and its relationship to the space of reality are analyzed. Different kinds of film structures and their theoretical underpinnings are studied. P. Sitney

VIS 443 Topics in Modern Italian Cinema (see ITA 310)

VIS 444 Cinema and the Related Arts (also COM 444)   Fall LA

A seminar examining the ways in which filmmakers have used one of the other arts as part of the self-definition of cinema as an autonomous art. One or two such interactions will be the focus of the course, and will vary by term (e.g., painting, architecture, poetry, narrative fiction). P. Sitney

VIS 445 Fascism in Italian Cinema (see ITA 312)

VIS 446 Marxism in Italian Cinema (see ITA 313)

VIS 448 Screenwriting II: Adaptation (see CWR 448)

VIS 451 Screenwriting for a Global Audience (see CWR 451)

VIS 462 Advanced Video and Film Production   Spring LA

A third-level film/video course to further develop video production skills. Students have the option of spending the term either creating a single long work or a series of short pieces. Short weekly shooting exercises. Students view one film each week outside of class time. Two studio classes, five hours per week. Prerequisite: 361 or 362 and instructor's permission. S. Friedrich

VIS 471 Special Topics in Visual Arts   Fall LA

Advanced work in special areas of the various visual media or in areas where the traditional media intersect (for example, typography, video, photoprintmaking). Specific topics will change from year to year, and prerequisites will vary. Staff

VIS 472 Special Topics in Visual Arts   Spring LA

Advanced work in special areas of the various visual media or in areas where the traditional media intersect (for example, typography, video, photoprintmaking). Specific topics will change from year to year, and prerequisites will vary. Staff