Hellenic Studies Announcements, 2005

  • Syriac Studies Workshop - Wednesday - Friday, May 4 - 6 "Symbols of Church and Kingdom"
    <Posted on 04/22/2005 14:02>

    Workshop Details are available.

  • Workshop - Friday, April 22, 2:30 p.m. Gary Bass: "Byron in Greece: The Roots of Humanitarian Intervention"
    <Posted on 04/19/2005 09:34>

    Gary Bass (Department of Politics)
    Respondent: Constanze G|thenke (Department of Classics and Program in Hellenic Studies)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    This talk is part of a book-in-progress on the roots of humanitarian military intervention. Rather than considering the arguments of human rights activists today for intervention in places like Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur as revolutionary new developments, the book argues that there is a long history of humanitarian interventions stretching back to at least the 1820s. These interventions, the book argues, were not imperialist, but in many cases worked directly against the imperial interests of the intervening powers. This presentation examines the British debate over intervention on behalf of the Greeks in the 1820s, pitting Lord Castlereagh against Bentham, Byron and the philhellenes of the London Greek Committee - ultimately resulting in the anti-Ottoman intervention at Navarino Bay in 1827.

    Gary Bass was recently awarded tenure as an associate professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals (Princeton University Press, 2000). Before coming to Princeton, Bass worked as a Washington reporter and West Coast correspondent for The Economist. He has also written for The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, Daedalus, Philosophy & Public Affairs, and other publications. He received his A.B. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University.

  • Film Series - Wednesday, April 20, 5:00 p.m. P. Koutsaftis: "Mourning Rock"
    <Posted on 04/18/2005 09:42>

    P. Koutsaftis, Mourning Rock, Documentary, 2001, 87 minutes (with subtitles)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    "Eleusis is a small industrial town some 20 kilometers west of Athens. Since prehistoric times it has been linked to the favorite legend of the ancients, the myth of Demeter, goddess of the earth, of agriculture and of fertility in general, and her daughter Persephone. The Eleusinian Mysteries that were held here for two thousand years were related to the life cycle itself and granted the mystoe, or initiates, hope and blessedness in facing death. Here where according to legend grain, the gift of the goddess was first cultivated, some of Greece's largest industries developed with catastrophic consequences on the environment and the sanctuary. We have been filming this town for ten years from the perspective of the pilgrim. We observed everyday activities both humble and grandiose, discovering grave offerings from its ancient identity built into its modern life. Eleusis lies to the west. It is a sacred place, a landmark and a vantage-point from where one can gaze outward at the world around as well as inward into one's self."

  • Workshop - Friday, April 15, 2:30 p.m. John Pinto: "Eighteenth-Century Architects and Antiquity: A Wider Prospect"
    <Posted on 04/15/2005 10:59>

    John Pinto (Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    By the middle of the eighteenth-century, knowledge of ancient architecture, which for so long had been based primarily on sites within Italy, began to expand dramatically. This talk will consider four publications that enriched the inventory of classical forms and made signal contributions to the history of archaeological site description: Wood and Dawkins's Palmyra (1753) and Balbec (1757), the first volume of Stuart and Revett's Antiquities of Athens (1762), and Robert Adam's Ruins of the Palace of the Emperor Diocletian at Spalatro (1764).

    John Pinto (pinto@princeton.edu) is the Howard Crosby Butler Memorial Professor of the History of Architecture in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1988. His books include Pietro Bracci and Eighteenth Century Rome (with Elisabeth Kieven, 2001); Hadrian's Villa and its Legacy (with William L. MacDonald, 1995), and The Trevi Fountain (1986). Professor Pinto has received many fellowships, awards, and grants, most recently the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, 2005-06. His current project "Architects and Antiquity in Eighteenth-Century Rome" is based on The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures, 2004-05, he delivered at the University of Michigan.

  • Student Presentation - Tuesday, April 19, 6:00 p.m. "Athens: Representations of a Twentieth Century City, Field Research in Athens"
    <Posted on 04/15/2005 10:42>

    Lucas Barron '08, Courtney Brein '08, Carolyn Crabtree '06, Joanne Dekis '08, Elizabeth Landau '06, Scott Moore '08, Emily Somerville '06, Dylan Tatz '06, Evelyn Thai '05, Andrea Wang '05
    with
    Effie Rentzou (Department of French and Italian and Program in Hellenic Studies)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    A field trip to Athens, March 11-20, 2005, formed an integral part of the HLS361/COM361 seminar "Representations of a Twentieth Century City" offered during the spring term 2005. The trip complemented the literary, visual, film, and other materials studied in the classroom. In this presentation the student participants will present the independent projects they designed and researched during the class trip. In their encounters with Athens, students move from neighborhood squares and open-air markets to the wide variety of cafes that populate the city; they cross from public art in the metro to contemporary Greek hip-hop music; they visit the Athens Jewish Museum and traverse Pikionis's masterpiece of landscape art; they confront the curious crossovers of Greek and English languages in Athenian life; and they face iconic Athenian landmarks, such as the Acropolis and Omonoia Square. These projects reflect the students' personal discoveries in and of the city of Athens, their attempt to represent it, and, together, they form a mosaic through which emerges a broader understanding of what a contemporary city is.

  • Workshop - Tuesday, April 12, 6:00 p.m. Elka Bakalova and Anna Lazarova: "The Relics of St. Spyridon and the Creation of Sacred Space on Corfu: Between Constantinople and Venice"
    <Posted on 04/08/2005 09:29>

    Elka Bakalova (New Bulgarian University; Visiting Fellow, Program in Hellenic Studies)
    and
    Anna Lazarova (Institute for Bulgarian Language)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    The cult of Saint Spyridon's relics in Corfu (Kerkyra), the capital of the Ionian Islands, offers an interesting and, perhaps, unique case for the creation of sacred space, both in the city itself and in the region as a whole. Moreover, this cult has not only determined the structure of the urban space, but it is also reflected in visual culture in a remarkably original manner. This presentation will point out how sacred space is relevant to the specific church holding the relics of the saint and to the church environment in general, as well as to the urban milieu, made sacred through religious processions, special performances, and liturgical rites.

    Elka Bakalova (bakalova@Princeton.EDU) is Professor of Byzantine and Mediaeval Art at the New Bulgarian University (Sofia) and corresponding member of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. She has written several books, including Frescoes at the Village of Berende (1976), The Bachkovo Ossuary (1977) and The Ossuary of the Bachkovo Monastery (2003, second English edition), The Monastery of Rozhen (1990), and co-authored The Monasteries in Bulgaria (1992) and Le Grand Livre des Icônes (Paris, 2002). She is the editor of the Art Studies quarterly (Problemi na izkoustvoto) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and has published a large number of articles on medieval art of Bulgaria and on the Balkans.

    Anna Lazarova is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropological Linguistics at the Institute for Bulgarian Language, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, and Lecturer in Modern Greek Language and Culture at the State University of Sofia. The title of her dissertation is: "Lexicology, Grammar and Cultural stereotypes. A comparative study of the semantics and the functions of the modal particles in Bulgarian and modern Greek."

  • Workshop - Friday, April 8, 2:30 p.m. Pantelis Kyprianos: "American Influences on Greek Formal Education, 1828-1940"
    <Posted on 04/04/2005 14:15>

    Pantelis Kyprianos (University of Patras; Visiting Fellow, Program in Hellenic Studies)
    Place: Room 103, Scheide Caldwell House, Princeton University

    To propagate the "lost essential principles of the Gospel" to the "nominal Christians" of the Oriental Churches, beginning in 1820 American missionaries founded a great number of schools in the Ottoman Empire and in the Balkans. With a few exceptions, during the 1830s and the 1840s missionaries were forced to abandon their schools located in the Kingdom of Greece, and focused on the Orthodox of the Ottoman Empire, mainly the Greeks and the Armenians. After 1922, and thanks to the combined efforts of missionaries, American officers, and Greek political and religious authorities, some of the American schools in the Ottoman Empire were relocated to Athens and Thessaloniki. Considering the increasing American presence in and influence on Europe since 1870, this presentation will examine how missionary activity helped shape Greek formal education from its first steps in 1828 until World War II.

    Pantelis Kyprianos (pkyprian@princeton.edu) studied at the Panteio University, Athens and did his post-graduate studies in Paris at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales and the University of Paris II (Ph.D., Political Sociology, 1990). He is Assistant Professor in the Department of Early Childhood Education at the University of Patras. His recent publications include Comparative History of Greek Education (Athens, 2004), as well as articles on political sociology and on the history of education.

  • Workshop - Tuesday, April 5, 6:00 p.m. Elli Papakonstantinou, Perry Cook, and Sophia Lycouris: "An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Perception of Urban Environments in Order to Map Cities in Flux"
    <Posted on 04/01/2005 11:22>

    Elli Papakonstantinou, Visiting Fellow, Program in Hellenic Studies
    Perry Cook, Department of Music, Princeton University
    Sophia Lycouris, Nottingham Trent University, UK.
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    'On the map of your empire, O Great Khan, there must be room both for the big, stone Fedora and the little Fedora in glass globes. Not because they are all equally real, but because all are only assumptions.' The Invisible Cities, Italo Calvino

    Starting with Athens, this project is an attempt to map big cities of the world. Poly-polis explores the interrelation between the imaginary and the real urban space, the individual perceptions and the pre-established representations in order to map cities as desires, memories, signs and ultimately individual perceptions of the 'postcard city'. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach in borrowing from fields such as architecture, literature, philosophy and history to develop the appropriate artistic means, which will challenge stereotypical representations of cities and create a multi-layered experience of the collective urban identity. Through bi-directional environments with sensors, voice processors etc. the viewers open their own dialogue with images of the city thus breaking the boundary between performance and audience. A three-dimensional interactive model of the city is developed with the use of New Hybrid Media- whereby the term 'New Hybrid Media' indicates interaction between technological and bodily expressiveness.

    Elli Papakonstantinou (epapakon@Princeton.EDU) studied at the School of Fine Arts (Thessaloniki) and the University of London (Master in Directing). As a director she collaborated with playwrights at the Royal Court Theatre, UK. for the creation and staging of new playwriting. She also adapted non-theatrical texts and plays. Her shows have been presented all over the world (the Opera House of Cairo, New York and the official inauguration ceremony of the New Library of Alexandria, etc.) and mostly in Greece (the National Theatre of Greece, etc.) and the UK (the West End, the off-West End and the Edinburgh Festival, etc.). She is co-founder and artistic director of the ODC Ensemble. The ODC Ensemble is a performing arts' company that explores the fusion of music, theatre and mixed media in both theatre spaces and site-specific performances. Ms Papakonstantinou was the recipient of the 'Edinburgh Festival First Award-1997' and of the 'Fulbright Artist's Award 2004-2005'.

    Perry R. Cook (prc@cs.Princeton.EDU) received a Masters and PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford in 1990. He continued at Stanford as Technical Director of the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, until joining the faculty of Princeton University in 1996, where he is now Associate Professor of Computer Science, with a joint appointment in Music. He has published over 120 technical/music papers, and presented lectures throughout the world on the acoustics of the voice and musical instrument simulation, human perception of sound, and interactive devices for expressive musical performance. He is the recipient of a 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, and is currently writing a new book on the subject of Technology and the Expressive Voice.

    Sophia Lycouris is a London-based dance and video artist, performer, company director, and academic with background in dance. Between 2000 and 2003, she had a Fellowship in Creative and Performing Arts awarded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board and, since 2003, she is Reader in Interdisciplinary Choreography at the Nottingham Trent University, UK.

  • Workshop - Tuesday, April 26, 6:00 p.m. Vassilis Fouskas: "The Clash of Empires and the Re-Fashioning of the Greater Middle East, 1913-1923"
    <Posted on 04/20/2005 13:41>

    Vassilis Fouskas (Kingston University; Visiting Fellow, Program in Hellenic Studies)
    Respondent: Molly Greene (Department of History and Program in Hellenic Studies)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    The first decades of the twentieth century witnessed the crisis and the irreversible decline of all major European-Asian empires: the Russian and the Austro-Hungarian empires had disappeared; the British and the French empires had begun their long struggle for survival. This workshop sets out the historical and political context in which the Great Powers and their near eastern proxy, Greece, had attempted to re-shape the environment of middle eastern and central asian politics in the period stretching from the end of the Balkan Wars to the Treaty of Lausanne. The political methods, the strategic concepts, the successes, and the failures of this grand initiative for the re-fashioning of the Ottoman regions, bear on today's geo-politics of the regions east of the Aegean Sea: the Greater Middle East Initiative, sponsored by the sole super-power, the United States.

    Vassilis K. Fouskas (vfouskas@princeton.edu) studied at the Universities of Athens, Perugia, and London. He is the author of, among others, Zones of Conflict: United States Foreign Policy in the Balkans and the Greater Middle East (2003) and Italy, Europe and the Left (1998). His most recent book (co-authored with Bulent Gokay), The New American Imperialism: The "War on Terror" and Blood for Oil, will be published later this year. Vassilis Fouskas is the founding editor of the peer-reviewed periodical Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans (Taylor & Francis), and is presently a Reader in international relations at Kingston University, London, a position he will leave on September 1, 2005, for a senior appointment at the Department of Politics, Stirling University, UK.

  • Film Series - Wednesday, April 13, 5:00 p.m. J. Nossiter: "Signs and Wonders"
    <Posted on 04/11/2005 09:30>

    J. Nossiter, Signs and Wonders, 2000, 108 min (in English)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    Discussion will follow with James Lasdun, co-writer of the screenplay and Lecturer in the Council of the Humanities and Creative Writing.

    Alec Fenton (Stellan Skarsgård), an American and his wife, Marjorie (Charlotte Rampling), an American of Greek origin, live with their two children in Athens. Both Alec's business life and his relationship with his daughter are guided by a playful but deeply felt need to interpret the smallest details of the world as significant. Under the influence of powerful signs and premonitions, Alec allows himself to veer in and out of a love affair with a colleague, Katherine (Deborah Kara Unger), eventually leaving his family and returning to America with his lover. Once there, however, the same belief system urges him back home for one final attempt to win back his family. But his new quest is endangered by the presence of a political activist, Andreas (Dimitris Katalifos), in his family's life. Andreas becomes the victim of a series of incidents, each one more threatening than the last

  • Film Series - Wednesday, April 6, 5:00 p.m. S. Goritsas: "From the Snow"
    <Posted on 04/05/2005 10:02>

    From the Snow (with subtitles), 1993, 90 min
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    The hellish descent of three refugees, members of the Greek minority of Northern Epirus in Albania, "from the snow" to the depths of Omonia Square in Athens. There they will face hunger, the evaporation of the vision, and the first symptoms of modern Athenians' latent - but unconfessed - racism. The film is loosely based on Sotiris Dimitriou's novel May your Name be Blessed.

  • Workshop - Thursday, April 28, 5:00 p.m. Nikolas Bakirtzis: "Topography, Architecture and Community on Mount Menoikeion: the Persistence of Monastic Tradition and its Realities"
    <Posted on 04/22/2005 15:01>

    Nikolas Bakirtzis (Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    The monastery of St. John Prodromos (the Forerunner), located on Mt. Menoikeion near Serres in Northern Greece, is a primary example of Byzantine and Post Byzantine Monasticism. Since the monastery's foundation in 1275, communal monastic life balances between seclusion and interaction, with the ultimate goal of heavenly salvation. Daily survival is accomplished by the uninterrupted labor of human experience, which humanizes and tames the wilderness of nature. Continuity is achieved through the persistence of monastic memory and tradition. This workshop presentation draws from the speaker's Ph.D. dissertation-in-progress and will attempt an introduction to the architectural topography of monastic life on Mount Menoikeion. It will focus on the legacy of monastic existence as it is expressed through the performative experience of two of its prominent leaders: The monastic founder Ioannikios and Abbess Fevronia, the leader of the community at present. Monastic life at Prodromos and its realities are deeply rooted in the diachronic life-cycle of its community. This sacred lineage is created by the repetitive dedication of the individual lives of monks and nuns to the common cause.

    Nikolas Bakirtzis is a graduate student in the Department of Art and Archaeology and the Program in Hellenic Studies. Supervised by Professor Slobodan Furhif, his dissertation entitled "The Monastery of Saint John Prodromos on Mount Menoikeion: A Topography of Monastic Life," discusses the architecture and the topography of monastic experience at Prodromos. Nikolas Bakirtzis received his B.A. in Byzantine Archaeology and an M.A. in Social Anthropology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, and has been active in a variety of archaeological projects and exhibitions. His publications include: An Essay on Byzantine Fortification. Northern Greece 4th-15th Centuries, co-authored with Ph. Oreopoulos (2001); "The Bey Hamam in Thessaloniki: A 'Paradise' of Catharsis for Citizens and Outsiders" (2004); "The Visual Language of Fortification Fagades: The Walls of Thessaloniki" (forthcoming, 2005); and "Creating a Sacred Landscape in Byzantium: Taming the Wilderness on Mt. Menoikeion" (forthcoming, 2005). Nikolas Bakirtzis will be in Istanbul during the next academic year under a Senior Residential Fellowship at the Anatolian Civilizations Institute of Kog University.

  • Workshop - Friday, April 15, 2:30 p.m. John Pinto: "Eighteenth-Century Architects and Antiquity: A Wider Prospect"
    <Posted on 04/12/2005 13:28>

    John Pinto (Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University)
    Scheide Caldwell House, Room 103

    By the middle of the eighteenth-century, knowledge of ancient architecture, which for so long had been based primarily on sites within Italy, began to expand dramatically. This talk will consider four publications that enriched the inventory of classical forms and made signal contributions to the history of archaeological site description: Wood and Dawkins's Palmyra (1753) and Balbec (1757), the first volume of Stuart and Revett's Antiquities of Athens (1762), and Robert Adam's Ruins of the Palace of the Emperor Diocletian at Spalatro (1764).

    John Pinto (pinto@princeton.edu) is the Howard Crosby Butler Memorial Professor of the History of Architecture in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1988. His books include Pietro Bracci and Eighteenth Century Rome (with Elisabeth Kieven, 2001); Hadrian's Villa and its Legacy (with William L. MacDonald, 1995), and The Trevi Fountain (1986). Professor Pinto has received many fellowships, awards, and grants, most recently the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, 2005-06. His current project "Architects and Antiquity in Eighteenth-Century Rome" is based on The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures, 2004-05, he delivered at the University of Michigan.