2D computer graphics

related topics
{system, computer, user}
{@card@, make, design}
{math, number, function}
{work, book, publish}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{car, race, vehicle}

2D computer graphics is the computer-based generation of digital images—mostly from two-dimensional models (such as 2D geometric models, text, and digital images) and by techniques specific to them. The word may stand for the branch of computer science that comprises such techniques, or for the models themselves.

2D computer graphics are mainly used in applications that were originally developed upon traditional printing and drawing technologies, such as typography, cartography, technical drawing, advertising, etc.. In those applications, the two-dimensional image is not just a representation of a real-world object, but an independent artifact with added semantic value; two-dimensional models are therefore preferred, because they give more direct control of the image than 3D computer graphics (whose approach is more akin to photography than to typography).

In many domains, such as desktop publishing, engineering, and business, a description of a document based on 2D computer graphics techniques can be much smaller than the corresponding digital image—often by a factor of 1/1000 or more. This representation is also more flexible since it can be rendered at different resolutions to suit different output devices. For these reasons, documents and illustrations are often stored or transmitted as 2D graphic files.

2D computer graphics started in the 1950s, based on vector graphics devices. These were largely supplanted by raster-based devices in the following decades. The PostScript language and the X Window System protocol were landmark developments in the field.

Contents

2D graphics techniques

2D graphics models may combine geometric models (also called vector graphics), digital images (also called raster graphics), text to be typeset (defined by content, font style and size, color, position, and orientation), mathematical functions and equations, and more. These components can be modified and manipulated by two-dimensional geometric transformations such as translation, rotation, scaling. In object-oriented graphics, the image is described indirectly by an object endowed with a self-rendering method—a procedure which assigns colors to the image pixels by an arbitrary algorithm. Complex models can be built by combining simpler objects, in the paradigms of object-oriented programming.

Full article ▸

related documents
Baudot code
Category 5 cable
Digital signal
Vectrex
Graphics Device Interface
Traceroute
Lotus Symphony
Blitz BASIC
JFS (file system)
Client-server
Routing table
GNU Debugger
FIFO
Multitier architecture
Software bug
NewtonScript
Middleware
PDP-1
AutoCAD
Gecko (layout engine)
Wine (software)
Cyrix 6x86
File viewer
Telnet
Intel 8086
Kerberos (protocol)
Jupiter Ace
Audio file format
IPsec
Protocol data unit